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We have the following: (pseudoish)

class MyClass
{
    private:
       struct MyStruct{
          MyStruct operator=(const MyOtherStruct& rhs);
          int am1;
          int am2;
       };
};

We'd like to overload the = operator in the MyClass.cpp to do something like:

MyStruct&
MyStruct::operator=(const MyOtherStruct& rhs)
{
   am1 = rhs.am1;
   am2 = rhs.am2;
}

However, it doesn't want to compile. We're getting an error similar to

"missing ; before &"

and

"MyStruct must be a class or namespace if followed by ::"

Is there some concept here I'm missing?

share|improve this question
1  
Why have you got 2 return types on your operator= function? – Troy Oct 3 '13 at 23:02
    
hey thanks, fixed! – MrDuk Oct 3 '13 at 23:03
1  
You're missing qualification. There's no MyStruct outside of the class. – chris Oct 3 '13 at 23:04
1  
There is no MyStruct::operator= since it's inside MyClass. Use MyClass::MyStruct::operator=. Also, don't forget to declare operator= in MyStruct. – syam Oct 3 '13 at 23:04
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to move your operator= for MyStruct into the struct declaration body:

class MyClass
{
    private:
       struct MyStruct{
          int am1;
          int am2;

          MyStruct& operator=(const MyOtherStruct& rhs)
          {
             am1 = rhs.am1;
             am2 = rhs.am2;
             return *this;
          }
       };
};

Or if that's not possible because MyOtherStruct is incomplete or don't want to clutter the class declaration:

class MyClass
{
    private:
       struct MyStruct{
          int am1;
          int am2;

          MyStruct& operator=(const MyOtherStruct& rhs);
       };
};

inline MyClass::MyStruct& MyClass::MyStruct::operator=(const MyOtherStruct& rhs)
{
    am1 = rhs.am1;
    am2 = rhs.am2;
    return *this;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wasn't finished editing the other option.... – Troy Oct 3 '13 at 23:09
    
Sorry, but I had to comment on what I actually saw. ;) – syam Oct 3 '13 at 23:11
    
why do we use inline here? Is it required? – MrDuk Oct 3 '13 at 23:12
    
@ctote If it's in the header it is. Otherwise you'll get multiple definition errors. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Definition_Rule – Troy Oct 3 '13 at 23:14

The syntax is

MyStruct& operator=(const MyOtherStruct& rhs) {
   // assignment logic goes here
   return *this;
}

for an operator directly within the body of MyStruct. Also note that I added the idiomatic return *this to let the assignment return a reference to this object.

EDIT in response to OP editing the question. You can also declare the operator in the body, and define it somewhere else. In this case, the syntax is:

MyClass::MyStruct& MyClass::MyStruct::operator=(const MyOtherStruct& rhs) {
   // assignment logic goes here
   return *this;
}
share|improve this answer

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