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I have about 3 weeks java experience so bear with me. I'm trying to make a program that calculates how many days I've been alive by following my teachers template but for the life of me I can't figure out why I keep getting the "error ';' expected.

public class age {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.print("Enter your date of birth");
    int calcDays = (String birthdate);{
        String m1 = birthdate.substring(0,1);
        String m2 = birthdate.substring(3,4);
        String m3 = birthdate.substring(6,9);
        int month = Integer.parseInt(m1);
        int day = Integer.parseInt(m2);
        int year = Integer.parseInt(m3);
        int dd = year * 365 + month * 30 + day;
        return(dd);
    }
    System.out.print("This is a test" + dd);
}

}

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2  
What do you think (String birthdate); does? –  Sotirios Delimanolis Oct 3 '13 at 23:57

1 Answer 1

It looks like you wandered from the template a bit. Here's what I think was meant:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class age {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner sysin = new Scanner(System.in); 
        System.out.print("Enter your date of birth");
        String birthdate = sysin.next();
        int dd = calcDays(birthdate);

        System.out.print("This is a test" + dd);
    }

    static int calcDays(String birthdate) {
        String m1 = birthdate.substring(0, 1);
        String m2 = birthdate.substring(3, 4);
        String m3 = birthdate.substring(6, 9);
        int month = Integer.parseInt(m1);
        int day = Integer.parseInt(m2);
        int year = Integer.parseInt(m3);
        int dd = year * 365 + month * 30 + day;
        return (dd);
    }
}

The output from a sample run:

    Enter your date of birth: 12/25/2000
    This is a test73032

Notes:

  1. The import statement makes the Scanner class visible.
  2. The class statement begins the definition of a class named "age". Normal Java conventions are to capitalize the names of classes (as in "Age"), but I kept your names. The class contains two static methods named main() and calcDays().
  3. The main() method is the starting point. It is executed by the Java runtime when you run the Age class (either through "java Age" at the command line, or by clicking on "Go" in an interactive development environment.)
  4. main() prints a prompt, uses a Scanner to read a string, passes that string to the calcDays() method, and prints the integer value returned by calcDays().
  5. The calcDays() methods accepts a string argument, dices that up into substring for month, day and year, converts those to integer values and computes a day number to return as a result.

Experiment with this. You'll find that even a small change in format will cause an exception and a lot of noisy-looking output. As you develop more technique, you'll find ways to adapt to reasonable variations, and politely reject unreasonable ones. The suggestion to look at the Java Tutorials is a good one, but if this is your first stab at programming in any language, then you might want to invest in a beginner's book (Head First Java, Java for Dummies, etc.) and THEN come back to the Tutorials to see the same material developed at greater depth.

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I have a book that I've been following but I'm still kinda struggling. Thanks a lot for this comment this helped me a lot. –  user2844726 Oct 4 '13 at 0:50
    
@user2844726 You appear to be a newbie to Stack Overflow. You should check out the Help Center, you would learn a lot about how this works. –  tbodt Oct 4 '13 at 2:01

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