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I'm coding in C++, and I have the following code:

int array[30];
array[9] = 1;
array[5] = 1;
array[14] = 1;

array[8] = 2;
array[15] = 2;
array[23] = 2;
array[12] = 2;
//...

Is there a way to initialize the array similar to the following?

int array[30];
array[9,5,14] = 1;
array[8,15,23,12] = 2;
//...

Note: In the actual code, there can be up to 30 slots that need to be set to one value.

share|improve this question
    
if they aren't contiguous it doesn't get much better than this, you could write a function that takes the array and the indicies –  aaronman Oct 4 '13 at 0:40
    
There's a GCC extension for this I think. Other than that, there's always array[9] = array[5] = array[14] = 1; I guess. –  chris Oct 4 '13 at 0:41
    
you can also do int number[3] = { 5, 7, 2 }; –  RamonBoza Oct 24 '13 at 7:34

10 Answers 10

up vote 30 down vote accepted

This function will help make it less painful.

void initialize(int * arr, std::initializer_list<std::size_t> list, int value) {
    for (auto i : list) {
        arr[i] = value;
    }
}

Call it like this.

initialize(array,{9,5,14},2);
share|improve this answer
    
Was about to post pretty much the same thing (but with templates). –  aschepler Oct 4 '13 at 0:47
1  
@aschepler too often SO is about typing speed (though I actually really suck at typing :) ) –  aaronman Oct 4 '13 at 0:50
    
Not that it's a competition or anything. –  aschepler Oct 4 '13 at 0:57
    
This is exactly what I need, just when I compile, I get the error: error: 'std::initializer_list' has not been declared along with syntax errors due to that. Any ideas? –  Random Person 323 Oct 4 '13 at 0:59
    
@RandomPerson323 do you have the -std=c++11 flag, what compiler are you using –  aaronman Oct 4 '13 at 1:01

A variant of aaronman's answer:

template <typename T>
void initialize(T array[], const T& value)
{
}

template <size_t index, size_t... indices, typename T>
void initialize(T array[], const T& value)
{
    array[index] = value;
    initialize<indices...>(array, value);
}

int main()
{
    int array[10];

    initialize<0,3,6>(array, 99);

    std::cout << array[0] << " " << array[3] << " " << array[6] << std::endl;
}

Example: Click here

share|improve this answer
1  
I like this one best for simplicity, altho coding mine was fun ;) –  Troy Oct 4 '13 at 6:14
1  
I like this one the best. Due to the way template expansion works, it's closest to the 'manual' way. Since it's all compiler time indexing, there is even the possibility of memset being used for larger contiguous chunks of identical values. –  KitsuneYMG Oct 4 '13 at 14:17

Just for the fun of it I created a somewhat different approach which needs a bit of infrastructure allowing initialization like so:

double array[40] = {};
"9 5 14"_idx(array) = 1;
"8 15 23 12"_idx(array) = 2;

If the digits need to be separated by commas, there is a small change needed. In any case, here is the complete code:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <iterator>

template <int Size, typename T = int>
class assign
{
    int  d_indices[Size];
    int* d_end;
    T*   d_array;
    void operator=(assign const&) = delete;
public:
    assign(char const* base, std::size_t n)
        : d_end(std::copy(std::istream_iterator<int>(
                      std::istringstream(std::string(base, n)) >> std::skipws),
                          std::istream_iterator<int>(), this->d_indices))
        , d_array()
    {
    }
    assign(assign<Size>* as, T* a)
        : d_end(std::copy(as->begin(), as->end(), this->d_indices))
        , d_array(a) {
    }
    assign(assign const& o)
        : d_end(std::copy(o.begin(), o.end(), this->d_indices))
        , d_array(o.d_array)
    {
    }
    int const* begin() const { return this->d_indices; }
    int const* end() const   { return this->d_end; }
    template <typename A>
    assign<Size, A> operator()(A* array) {
        return assign<Size, A>(this, array);
    }
    void operator=(T const& value) {
        for (auto it(this->begin()), end(this->end()); it != end; ++it) {
            d_array[*it] = value;
        }
    }
};

assign<30> operator""_idx(char const* base, std::size_t n)
{
    return assign<30>(base, n);
}

int main()
{
    double array[40] = {};
    "1 3 5"_idx(array) = 17;
    "4 18 7"_idx(array) = 19;
    std::copy(std::begin(array), std::end(array),
              std::ostream_iterator<double>(std::cout, " "));
    std::cout << "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Although this would not be as readably, it would definitely save space. –  Random Person 323 Oct 4 '13 at 1:29
6  
This is slightly disturbing +1 –  aaronman Oct 4 '13 at 1:33
    
Lol, yes, this it crazy. One question: Would this be more efficient (At running the program, not typing), and if so, by how much? –  Random Person 323 Oct 4 '13 at 1:35
    
@Dietmar Kühl Interesting. I must play around with the literal operator sometime. Can you see any problems with my answer? –  Troy Oct 4 '13 at 2:10
    
@RandomPerson323: The implementation in the answer uses a fairly heavy-weight run-time approach to parsing the string. It could be done at compile-time, emitting constant expression, I think but it wouldn't necessarily be faster. Personally, I'm not quite satisfied with the notation and my main reason for posting it was to show an alternative which may lead to something useful. –  Dietmar Kühl Oct 4 '13 at 20:02

I just had a play around for the sake of fun / experimentation (Note my concerns at the bottom of the answer):

It's used like this:

smartAssign(array)[0][8]       = 1;
smartAssign(array)[1][4][2]    = 2;
smartAssign(array)[3]          = 3;
smartAssign(array)[5][9][6][7] = 4;

Source code:

#include <assert.h> //Needed to test variables
#include <iostream>
#include <cstddef>

template <class ArrayPtr, class Value>
class SmartAssign
{
    ArrayPtr m_array;

public:
    class Proxy
    {
        ArrayPtr m_array;
        size_t m_index;
        Proxy* m_prev;

        Proxy(ArrayPtr array, size_t index)
            : m_array(array)
            , m_index(index)
            , m_prev(nullptr)
        { }

        Proxy(Proxy* prev, size_t index)
            : m_array(prev->m_array)
            , m_index(index)
            , m_prev(prev)
        { }

        void assign(Value value)
        {
            m_array[m_index] = value;            
            for (auto prev = m_prev; prev; prev = prev->m_prev) {
                m_array[prev->m_index] = value;
            }
        }

    public:
        void operator=(Value value)
        {
            assign(value);
        }

        Proxy operator[](size_t index)
        {
          return Proxy{this, index};
        }

        friend class SmartAssign;
    };

    SmartAssign(ArrayPtr array)
        : m_array(array)
    {
    }


    Proxy operator[](size_t index)
    {
        return Proxy{m_array, index};
    }
};

template <class T>
SmartAssign<T*, T> smartAssign(T* array)
{
    return SmartAssign<T*, T>(array);
}

int main()
{
    int array[10];

    smartAssign(array)[0][8]       = 1;
    smartAssign(array)[1][4][2]    = 2;
    smartAssign(array)[3]          = 3;
    smartAssign(array)[5][9][6][7] = 4;

    for (auto i : array) {
        std::cout << i << "\n";
    }

    //Now to test the variables
    assert(array[0] == 1 && array[8] == 1);
    assert(array[1] == 2 && array[4] == 2 && array[2] == 2);
    assert(array[3] == 3);
    assert(array[5] == 4 && array[9] == 4 && array[6] == 4 && array[7] == 4);
}

Let me know what you think, I don't typically write much code like this, I'm sure someone will point out some problems somewhere ;)

I'm not a 100% certain of the lifetime of the proxy objects.

share|improve this answer

Compilers which still doesn't support variadic template argument and universal initialization list, it can be a pain to realize, that some of the posted solution will not work

As it seems, OP only intends to work with arrays of numbers, valarray with variable arguments can actually solve this problem quite easily.

#include <valarray>     
#include <cstdarg>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
template <std::size_t size >
std::valarray<std::size_t>  selection( ... )
{
    va_list arguments; 
    std::valarray<std::size_t> sel(size);   
    //Skip the first element
    va_start ( arguments, size );
    va_arg ( arguments, int );
    for(auto &elem : sel)
        elem = va_arg ( arguments, int );
    va_end ( arguments );
    return sel;

}
int main ()
{
    //Create an array of 30 integers
    std::valarray<int> array(30);
    //The first argument is the count of indexes
    //followed by the indexes of the array to initialize
    array[selection<3>(9,5,14)] = 1;
    array[selection<4>(8,15,13, 12)] = 2;
    std::copy(std::begin(array), std::end(array),
              std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I liked this one! (though i hate va_lists) but i've tested the code on ideone ( ideone.com/tCma9B ) and doesn't works: it doesn't initialize the first index passed on selection. –  PaperBirdMaster Oct 4 '13 at 7:39
    
@PaperBirdMaster: The first index is the length rather than the Index, so it will not be initialized. As you might recollect, the way argument passing works, there should be someway for the recipient to know what is the data type and no of data passed. The first number in the list actually does it. –  Abhijit Oct 4 '13 at 10:31
    
@PaperBirdMaster: I understand your predicament in using va_list, but unless we have something better initialization list or variadic template, that is the only viable approach. –  Abhijit Oct 4 '13 at 10:32
    
oh! first number is the lenght, sorry for the misunderstanding :O –  PaperBirdMaster Oct 4 '13 at 10:36
    
So, is std::valarray<int> array(30); to create the array? –  Random Person 323 Oct 4 '13 at 11:18

The best you can do if your indexes are unrelated is "chaining" the assignments:

array[9] = array[5] = array[14] = 1;

However if you have some way to compute your indexes in a deterministic way you could use a loop:

for (size_t i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
    array[transform_into_index(i)] = 1;

This last example also obviously applies if you have some container where your indexes are stored. So you could well do something like this:

const std::vector<size_t> indexes = { 9, 5, 14 };
for (auto i: indexes)
    array[i] = 1;
share|improve this answer
    
With only 30 values, I'm not sure if the overhead of calling a function transform_into_index() is worth a few less lines of code. Performance hit for nothing. –  Tommy Oct 4 '13 at 0:46
2  
In C++, a function call is often not a performance hit at all. Also, premature optimization is the root of all evil. –  aschepler Oct 4 '13 at 0:49
1  
@Tommy I for one am not sure the performance hit is a reason enough to write less readable code, especially since the function might well be inlined (and thus the call costs nothing ; the loop may in fact be unrolled and all indexes computed at compile-time, think constexpr). –  syam Oct 4 '13 at 0:50
    
But the code is not unreadable. Perhaps sorting the statements so that array[1] =, array[2]=... this is called loop unrolling and has advantages. Simple > Complicated. I stress again that if there were 300 values or something, then a loop would most definitely be needed. –  Tommy Oct 4 '13 at 0:52
    
@Tommy Well, "unreadable" is a matter of opinion. Repeating the same variable name 30 times is definitely unreadable (rather unmaintainable, actually) in my book. –  syam Oct 4 '13 at 0:53

I remember, for static initialization exist syntax like:

int array[30] = {
  [9] = 1, [8] = 2
}

And so on. This works in gcc, about another compilers - I do not know.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems like it would be simpler, except sadly, the compiler I'm using gives me the error: sorry, unimplemented: non-trivial designated initializers not supported. –  Random Person 323 Oct 4 '13 at 0:53

Any fancy trickery you do will be unrolled by the compiler/assembler into exactly what you have. Are you doing this for readability reasons? If your array is already init, you can do:

array[8] = array[15] = array[23] = array[12] = 2;

But I stress my point above; it will be transformed into exactly what you have.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, like you mentioned, I am doing this for readiblity/simplicity, rather than for efficiency. –  Random Person 323 Oct 4 '13 at 0:54

Use overload operator << .

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <cmath>

// value and indexes wrapper
template< typename T,  std::size_t ... Ints> struct _s{ T value; };

//deduced value type
template< std::size_t ... Ints,  typename T>
constexpr inline   _s<T, Ints... >  _ ( T const& v )noexcept { return {v}; }


// stored array reference
template< typename T, std::size_t N>
struct _ref
{
    using array_ref = T (&)[N];

    array_ref ref;
};


//join _s and _ref with << operator.
template< 
        template< typename , std::size_t ... > class IC, 
        typename U, std::size_t N, std::size_t ... indexes
        >
constexpr _ref<U,N> operator << (_ref<U,N> r, IC<U, indexes...> ic ) noexcept
{
    using list = bool[];
    return (  (void)list{ false, (  (void)(r.ref[indexes] = ic.value), false) ... }) , r ;

    //return r;
}


//helper function, for creating _ref<T,N> from array.
template< typename T, std::size_t N>
constexpr inline _ref<T,N> _i(T (&array)[N] ) noexcept { return {array}; }



int main()
{

   int a[15] = {0};

   _i(a) << _<0,3,4,5>(7) << _<8,9, 14>( 6 ) ;


   for(auto x : a)std::cout << x << "  " ;  
   //       0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14
  //result: 7  0  0  7  7  7  0  0  6  6  0  0  0  0  6


  double b[101]{0};

  _i(b) << _<0,10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90>(3.14) 
        << _<11,21,22,23,24,25>(2.71) 
        << _<5,15,25,45,95>(1.414) ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Although this would be slightly less readable (because of the underscore syntax), how wold it compare speed-wise to aarman's answer? –  Random Person 323 Oct 4 '13 at 11:08
    
I agree about less readable. aarman's answer is good, but it can't check array bound. My implement can't check array bound,too, but it can give warning at compile time. –  Khurshid Normuradov Oct 4 '13 at 13:26
struct _i_t
{
    int * array;


    struct s
    {
        int* array;
        std::initializer_list<int> l;

        s const&   operator = (int value) const noexcept
        {
            for(auto i : l )
              array[i] = value;

            return *this;
        }
    };

    s operator []( std::initializer_list<int> i ) const noexcept
    {
        return s{array, i};
    }
};

template< std::size_t N>
constexpr _i_t   _i( int(&array)[N]) noexcept { return {array}; }

int main()
{
  int a[15] = {0};
  _i(a)[{1,3,5,7,9}] =  7;

  for(auto x : a)std::cout << x << ' ';


}
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