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What I am trying to do is print out an incrementing set that increments from the end (see example below).

The code that I have takes a set of operators and changes them one by one, beginning at the end and working backwards. Here is what I have (mut being mutation):

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String[] set = {"*", "*", "*"};
    int numOfMuts = 6;

    int currMutIndex = set.length - 1;
    String currOp = set[currMutIndex];
    String nextMut = currOp;

    for (int i = 1; i <= numOfMuts; i++) {
        nextMut = shiftOperator(nextMut);
        if (nextMut.equals(currOp)) {
            set[currMutIndex] = currOp;

            if ((currMutIndex--) == -1) {
                break;
            }

            currOp = set[currMutIndex];
            nextMut = shiftOperator(currOp);
        }
        set[currMutIndex] = nextMut;

        //print out the set
        printSet(set);
    }
}

/*
    This method shifts the operator to the next in the set of
    [*, +, -, /]. This is the order of the ASCII operator precedence.
*/
public static String shiftOperator(String operator) {
    if (operator.equals("*")) {
        return "+";
    } else if (operator.equals("+")) {
        return "-";
    } else if (operator.equals("-")) {
        return "/";
    } else { //operator is "/"
        return "*";
    }
}

Which gives me:

*, *, +
*, *, -
*, *, /
*, +, *
*, -, *
*, /, *

But what I want is:

*, *, +
*, *, -
*, *, /
*, +, *
*, +, +
*, +, -

To explain the problem in even more simple terms, using numbers:

1, 1, 1       1, 3, 1
1, 1, 2       1, 3, 2
1, 1, 3       1, 3, 3
1, 1, 4       1, 3, 4
1, 2, 1       1, 4, 1
1, 2, 2       1, 4, 2
1, 2, 3       1, 4, 3
1, 2, 4       1, 4, 4
1, 3, 1       2, 1, 1
1, 3, 2       2, 1, 2

and so on, for the number of mutations I want to produce. How would I need to modify the algorithm or what (I'm sure there is) easier way is there to achieve this? I'm not even sure of the name of what I am asking, so please tag as needed.

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you should make an effort to clearly explain your problem in words –  erjoalgo Oct 4 '13 at 1:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Basically, what you're trying to do is count in Quaternary. Much like how binary is structured as a number:

2^(n-1) 2^(n-2) ... 2^1 2^0

which results in: 0, 1, 10, 11, 100 and so on if we count upwards.

A Quaternary system would count in the same manner using:

4^(n-1) 4^(n-2) ... 4^1 4^0

and that would result in: 0, 1, 2, 3, 10, 11, 12, 13, 20 and so on. You can do the same with any number system. Here's some code that would do what you're asking for:

    String set[] = new String[3];
    String countSymbols[] = {"*", "+","-","/"}

    /* You can set to however far you want to count here, but in your code, 
      the limit would be (4^3)-1 = 3*(4^2)+3(4^1)+3*(4^0) = 63. We get this
      because there's 4 symbols and 3 digits. */

    for (int i = 0 ; i < 64 ; i++) {
       /* Since you're trying to print them in increasing order, we'll have to set
          the values in reverse order as well. */
       // 4^0 = 1
       set[2] = countSymbols[i%4];

       // 4^1 = 4
       set[1] = countSymbols[(i/4)%4]

       // 4^2 = 16
       set[0] = countSymbols[(i/16)%4]

       printSet(set);
    }

Hope this helps.

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Aha! Thank you so much for the explanation. Sometimes I just need a different perspective to make sense out of such simple problems. I can change this code around a bit to fit my needs. –  Steven G Oct 4 '13 at 11:24

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