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I'm working on a piece of code in C# / XNA where I'm highly concerned with performance. Part of this is passing several structs that are stored in arrays to various functions.

Before this is asked, these are indeed supposed to be structs, not classes. They're essentially value types, and they need to (basically) live on the stack. There are many of them, they come and go very quickly, and getting the garbage collector involved for them (even if I were running pools) would be expensive.

I've already improved performance quite a bit by passing by reference, but I'm wondering what the performance implications of that is when the same struct at the same index of an array is passed to several different functions by reference. I assume that in order for this to all work, C# has to internally pin the array pointer before passing the struct. Would I gain performance by pinning the struct first and passing the pointer instead?

For example. If I have something like:

for(int i = 0; i < array.Length; ++i)
{
    value = Function1(ref array[i]);

    // Lots of code....

    otherValue = Function2(ref array[i]);

    // Lots of code....

    anotherValue = Function3(ref array[i]);
}

Doesn't C# essentially have to do this?

for(int i = 0; i < array.Length; ++i)
{
    pin(array);
    value = Function1(ref array[i]);
    unpin(array);

    // Lots of code....

    pin(array);
    otherValue = Function2(ref array[i]);
    unpin(array);

    // Lots of code....

    pin(array);
    anotherValue = Function3(ref array[i]);
    unpin(array);
}

And would I be better off doing this?

for(int i = 0; i < array.Length; ++i)
{
    fixed(struct* working = ^array[i]) 
    {
        value = Function1(working);

        // Lots of code....

        otherValue = Function2(working);

        // Lots of code....

        anotherValue = Function3(working);
    }
}

Or, even better,

fixed(struct* working = ^array[0]) 
{
    for(int i = 0; i < array.Length; ++i)
    {
        value = Function1(working[i]);

        // Lots of code....

        otherValue = Function2(working[i]);

        // Lots of code....

        anotherValue = Function3(working[i]);
    }
}

Or is the C# compiler / JITter smart enough to automatically pin the array?

share|improve this question
    
This is orthogonal to your question, but you should never write "// Lots of code...". You should factor out similar bits of code to their own small methods. Then, let the compiler do the work to inline that code for you. Also, as for repeatedly accessing "working[i]", DRY: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don't_repeat_yourself And, profile your code to find perf issues :) Optimization at a low level is only good if you don't have an algorithmic alternative. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Dec 16 '09 at 20:24
    
Agree. Obviously what's actually happening in the actual written function is way more complex than the example makes it out to be. The system was profiled and this function is a bottleneck with no algorithmic alternative to low level optimization other than to decrease the accuracy of the function. –  Jeff Jan 27 '10 at 16:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You're confusing managed references with pointers.

A managed reference never needs to be pinned, even if it points to an element in an array, because the GC "knows about" the reference and will update it if the array is moved.

Pinning is only necessary for unmanaged pointers in unsafe code, and should be avoided where possible for performance reasons.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 To drive home the point, using fixed in this case would negatively impact performance, possibly significantly. –  Sam Harwell Dec 16 '09 at 20:00
    
That's what I needed to know. Thanks! –  Jeff Dec 16 '09 at 20:03

I'm not sure about XNA (it's a different CLR), but .NET Framework (as of 3.5) doesn't pin things passed by reference (by default unless they're being passed to unmanaged code. If the GC is invoked, it can still move the data, since the stack is scanned for references. If there's unmanaged code going on at some level, then, yes, it does need to be pinned.

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