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#include<stdio.h>

char* my_strcpy(char*,const char*);

int main(){
        char a[20];
        char* s = "Hello world!";
        char* d = a;
        my_strcpy(d,s);
        printf("\n d : %s \n",d);
        return 0;
}

char* my_strcpy(char* dest,const char* sour){
        if(NULL == dest || NULL == sour){
                return NULL;
        }
        while(1){
                *dest++ = *sour++;
                if(*sour == '\0'){
                        *dest = *sour;
                        break;
                }
        }
}

why do we need the char* as a return type for my_strcpy. If the d is " " it gives me a segmentation fault. If I assign it with a it works fine. Why does it give seg fault when given "".

MODIFIED : After the answers

#include<stdio.h>

char* my_strcpy(char*,const char*);

int main(){
        char* ret;
        char a[20];
        char* s = "Hello world!";
        char* d = "";
        ret = my_strcpy(d,s);
        if(NULL == ret){
                perror("\nret");
        }
//      printf("\n d : %s \n",d);
        return 0;
}

char* my_strcpy(char* dest,const char* sour){
        char* temp;

        if(NULL == dest || NULL == sour){
                return NULL; 
        }

        temp = dest;
        while(1){ 
                *temp++ = *sour++;
                if(*sour == '\0'){
                        *temp = *sour;
                        break;
                }
        }
        return temp;
}

This still gives a segfault. How to handle the condition if s="" when passed to the function strcpy.

share|improve this question
1  
my_strcpy is not returning any thing? Also do this: if(*(dest-1) == '\0') –  sgar91 Oct 4 '13 at 5:24
2  
You have changed your question please revert back to previous version. if(*sour == '\0') was if(*dest == '\0') –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 4 '13 at 5:42
1  
The unexplained change confuses the new reader and one can't relate the answers to the current question –  fayyazkl Oct 4 '13 at 5:43
2  
@Angus No problem, but from next time be-careful and take time before post question. I hope you might got your answers. –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 4 '13 at 6:00
1  
As things stand now (2010-10-04 06:00:00Z — revision 7), using s = ""; causes problems because the *dest++ = *sour++; line has copied the null (zero) byte and is now looking at data after the end of the string (yielding undefined behaviour). The canonical form of the loop (for your choice of variable names) is while ((*dest++ = *sour++) != '\0') ; with the semicolon being an empty loop body on the next line (but line breaks don't show in SO comments). This does the assignment, increments the pointers, and checks whether the assigned character was the zero byte, all in one operation. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 4 '13 at 6:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You asked: "If the d is " " it gives me a segmentation fault." Answer: If you assign "" or " " to d, there will not be enough space to fit "Hello World". Moreover, a constant string if assigned to a memory page tagged as data might not allow modification.

You asked "why do we need the char* as a return type for my_strcpy" as the original strcpy I presume. Answer: You do not have to. You could have void as return type. However, it makes it practical if one is to do something like this:

printf ("%s", strcpy (dest, sour));

Corrected code:

    while(1){
            *dest++ = *sour++;
            if(*(sour-1) == '\0'){
                    break;
            }

or better:

            while(*sour != '\0'){
                *dest++ = *sour++;
            }
           *dest = *sour;
share|improve this answer
2  
constant/immutable strings cannot be modified nevertheless. He did not pass the original a, as destination whose memory can be modified –  fayyazkl Oct 4 '13 at 5:47
    
Thanks for your comment that I read right after updating my answer. –  Tarik Oct 4 '13 at 5:49
    
returning char* will help in call chaining too. –  Koushik Oct 4 '13 at 6:02
    
@Koushik : What is call chaining ? –  Angus Oct 4 '13 at 6:29
1  
@Angus something like my_strcpy(dest2,my_strcpy(dest1,src)). so on. –  Koushik Oct 4 '13 at 6:34

Here you:

  1. Assign the value at *sour to *dest
  2. Increment both sour and dest so now the point to the next characters
  3. Test if *dest is now NUL to exit the loop

As you can see, the 3rd step reads from uninitialized memory. You should test if the value that was assigned before incrementing was NUL.

            *dest++ = *sour++;
            if(*dest == '\0'){
                    break;
            }

If the dest you pass in is a constant string like " " you get a segfault because string constants are stored in read-only memory. They cannot be modified.

share|improve this answer
2  
I think the last part is the real problem here (at least with the edited question now) i.e. passing a const string "" and expecting it to be modified with strcpy. +1 –  fayyazkl Oct 4 '13 at 5:45
    
Algorithm is correct and is not the cause of the problem. –  Tarik Oct 4 '13 at 5:51
    
@tarik, the original algorithm had the mentioned error. –  Joni Oct 4 '13 at 5:56
    
You are correct indeed. –  Tarik Oct 4 '13 at 6:17

Correct:

 if(*dest == '\0'){

should be:

 if(*(dest - 1) == '\0'){

Note:

 *dest++ = *sour++;

is equivalent to

*dest = *sour;
sour++;
dest++;

You increments dest after assignment, and so you are checking \0 at position where garbage value present as you don't initialize a[] -causes Undefined behaviour. Additionally you don't return after while loop.

You can simply write your function as:

char* my_strcpy(char* dest,const char* sour){
     if(NULL == dest || NULL == sour)
         return NULL;
    char* d = dest;
     while(*dest++ = *sour++)
        ;
     return d;
}

Give it a try!!

share|improve this answer
    
Although the while loop is confusing, it is correct. The if statement takes care of checking if a null character has been reached and copying it before breaking. –  Tarik Oct 4 '13 at 5:45
    
Yes if(*(dest - 1) == '\0') this is what OP need to change. –  Gangadhar Oct 4 '13 at 6:28
1  
@Gangadhar So every this is seems correct in answer.. Thanks for your upvote. –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 4 '13 at 6:31

here is a simple version:

char *my_strcpy(char *d, const char *s){
  int i=0;
  while(d[i++]=*s++)
    /*done inside condition*/;
  return d;
}
share|improve this answer

I would advise to implement strcpy as:

char* my_strcpy (char* s1, const char* s2)
{
  char* return_val = s1;

  *s1 = *s2;

  while(*s2 != '\0')
  {
    s1++;
    s2++;
    *s1 = *s2;
  }

  return return_val;
}

Always avoid multiple ++ statements in the same expression. There is never a reason to do so and it will sooner or later give you a handful of undefined/unspecified behavior bugs.

share|improve this answer

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