Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Consider the following example:

data TestType = Free | Occupied { oc_field1 :: Int,
                                  oc_field2 :: Int,
                                  oc_field3 :: Int,
                                  oc_field4 :: Int
                                }

type SampleTest = [TestType]

filterOccupied :: SampleTest -> SampleTest
filterOccupied test = filter (\x -> case x of
                                 Occupied _ _ _ _ -> True
                                 Free -> False ) test

In the above example, inside filterOccupied I have to use four _ for matching Occupied type.

This becomes really painful when the records has more than ten fields. Is there a better way to do this ?

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use {} pattern instead.

filterOccupied :: SampleTest -> SampleTest
filterOccupied test = filter (\x -> case x of
                                 Occupied {} -> True
                                 Free -> False ) test
share|improve this answer

Adding to snak's answer, this might also be easier with a list comprehension:

filterOccupied :: SampleTest -> SampleTest
filterOccupied test = [x | x@(Occupied {}) <- test]

Only items that match the pattern are retained in the list.

share|improve this answer

What about:

data TestType = Free
              | Occupied { oc_field1 :: Int
                         , oc_field2 :: Int
                         , oc_field3 :: Int
                         , oc_field4 :: Int
                         }
    deriving Eq

filterOccupied :: [TestType] -> [TestType]
filterOccupied = filter (Free/=)
share|improve this answer
    
I dislike the use of equality tests where you could use pattern matching instead, as it produces a spurious Eq constraint (it's even worse with (== []), which you see in new Haskellers' code, as then the elements get the constraint). Plus it's just less elegant. Defining isFree/isOccupied functions would be my preferred approach if you really wanted something like this. – Antal Spector-Zabusky Oct 4 '13 at 16:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.