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Saw this question on Careercup.com:

Given heights of n persons standing in a line and a list of numbers corresponding to each person (p) that gives the number of persons who are taller than p and standing in front of p. For example,

Heights: 5 3 2 6 1 4

InFronts:0 1 2 0 3 2

Means that the actual actual order is: 5 3 2 1 6 4

The question gets the two lists of Heights and InFronts, and should generate the order standing in line.

My solution:

It could be solved by first sorting the list in descending order. Obviously, to sort, we need to define an object Person (with two attributes of Height and InFront) and then sort Persons based on their height. Then, I would use two stacks, a main stack and a temp one, to build up the order.

Starting from the tallest, put it in the main stack. If the next person had an InFront value of greater than the person on top of the stack, that means the new person should be added before the person on top. Therefore, we need to pop persons from the main stack, insert the new person, and then return the persons popped out in the first step. I would use a temp stack to keep the order of the popped out persons. But how many should be popped out? Since the list is sorted, we need to pop exactly the number of persons in front of the new person, i.e. corresponding InFront.

I think this solution works. But the worst case order would be O(n^2) -- when putting a person in place needs popping out all previous ones.

Is there any other solutions? possibly in O(n)?

share|improve this question
    
Are the ties in height possible? – Evgeny Shavlyugin Oct 4 '13 at 6:35
    
If we assume none is taller than the other, then the above solution works with ties. Don't know if it makes a difference in other possible solutions tho. – Niki Oct 4 '13 at 6:38
    
in your example, I think correctly would be InFronts: 0 1 2 3 0 2. – wxyz Oct 4 '13 at 6:43
1  
In the actual order (5 3 2 1 6 4), '1' has index 3 (0 based) and there are 3 in front of it, all higher than it, so it should have the value 3 in inFronts list, not 0. – wxyz Oct 4 '13 at 7:00
2  
@wxyz it has an index of 3. It is not 0. Compare the height list and infront's list. – user1990169 Oct 4 '13 at 7:14

The O(nlogn) algoritm is possible.

First assume that all heights are different.

Sort people by heights. Then iterate from shortest to tallest. In each step you need an efficient way to put the next person to the correct position. Notice that people we've already placed are not taller that the current person. And the people we place after are taller than the current. So we have to find a place such that the number of empty positions in the front is equal to the inFronts value of this person. This task can be done using a data structure called interval tree in O(logn) time. So the total time of an algorithm is O(nlogn).

This algorithm works well in case where there's no ties. As it may be safely assumed that empty places up to front will be filled by taller people.

In case when ties are possible, we need to assure that people of the same height are placed in increasing order of their positions. It can be achieved if we will process people by non-decreasing inFronts value. So, in case of possible ties we should also consider inFronts values when sorting people.

And if at some step we can't find a position for next person then the answer it "it's impossible to satisfy problem constraints".

share|improve this answer
1  
Can you explain in more detail, how can we do this in O(nlogn) using the interval tree ? – Yashasvi Nov 2 '14 at 9:41
    
@Yash, In nodes of our interval tree we store the sum of elements on the interval. Start from the root. In each step we first look if the sum of the elements in left child is less than our value. If it's true, then the answer is in the left subtree. Otherwise - in the right subtree. In the last case subtract sum of the left subtree from current value. Apply this step until leaf node is reached. – Evgeny Shavlyugin Nov 7 '14 at 19:18

There exists an algorithm with O(nlogn) average complexity, however worst case complexity is still O(n²).

To achieve this you can use a variation of a binary tree. The idea is, in this tree, each node corresponds to a person and each node keeps track of how many people are in front of him (which is the size of the left subtree) as nodes are inserted.

Start iterating the persons array in decreasing height order and insert each person into the tree starting from the root. Insertion is as follows:

  1. Compare the frontCount of the person with the current node's (root at the beginning) value.
  2. If it is smaller than it insert the node to the left with value 1. Increase the current node's value by 1.
  3. Else, descend to the right by decreasing the person's frontCount by current node's value. This enables the node to be placed in the correct location.

After all nodes finished, an inorder traversal gives the correct order of people.

Let the code speak for itself:

public static void arrange(int[] heights, int[] frontCounts) {
  Person[] persons = new Person[heights.length];

  for (int i = 0; i < persons.length; i++)
    persons[i] = new Person(heights[i], frontCounts[i]);

  Arrays.sort(persons, (p1, p2) -> {
    return Integer.compare(p2.height, p1.height);
  });

  Node root = new Node(persons[0]);

  for (int i = 1; i < persons.length; i++) {
    insert(root, persons[i]);
  }

  inOrderPrint(root);
}


private static void insert(Node root, Person p) {
  insert(root, p, p.frontCount);
}

private static void insert(Node root, Person p, int value) {
  if (value < root.value) { // should insert to the left
    if (root.left == null) {
      root.left = new Node(p);
    } else {
      insert(root.left, p, value);
    }
    root.value++; // Increase the current node value while descending left!
  } else { // insert to the right
    if (root.right == null) {
      root.right = new Node(p);
    } else {
      insert(root.right, p, value - root.value);
    }
  }
}

private static void inOrderPrint(Node root) {
  if (root == null)
    return;

  inOrderPrint(root.left);

  System.out.print(root.person.height);

  inOrderPrint(root.right);
}

private static class Node {
  Node left, right;
  int value;
  public final Person person;

  public Node(Person person) {
    this.value = 1;
    this.person = person;
  }
}

private static class Person {
  public final int height;
  public final int frontCount;

  Person(int height, int frontCount) {
    this.height = height;
    this.frontCount = frontCount;
  }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
  int[] heights = {5, 3, 2, 6, 1, 4};
  int[] frontCounts = {0, 1, 2, 0, 3, 2};

  arrange(heights, frontCounts);
}
share|improve this answer

I think one approach can be the following. Although it again seems to be O(n^2) at present.

Sort the Height array and corresponding 'p' array in ascending order of heights (in O(nlogn)). Pick the first element in the list. Put that element in the final array in the position given by the p index.

For example after sorting,
H - 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
p - 3, 2, 1, 2, 0, 0.

1st element should go in position 3. Hence final array becomes:
---1--

2nd element shall go in position 2. Hence final array becomes:
--21--

3rd element should go in position 1. Hence final array becomes:
-321--

4th element shall go in position 2. This is the position among the empty ones. Hence final array becomes:
-321-4

5th element shall go in position 0. Hence final array becomes:
5321-4

6th element should go in position 0. Hence final array becomes:
532164

share|improve this answer

I'm using LinkedList for the this. Sort the tallCount[] in ascending order and accordingly re-position the items in heights[]. This is capable of handling the duplicate elements also.

public class FindHeightOrder {

public int[] findOrder(final int[] heights, final int[] tallCount) {
    if (heights == null || heights.length == 0 || tallCount == null
            || tallCount.length == 0 || tallCount.length != heights.length) {
        return null;
    }
    LinkedList list = new LinkedList();
    list.insertAtStart(heights[0]);
    for (int i = 1; i < heights.length; i++) {
        if (tallCount[i] == 0) {
            Link temp = list.getHead();
            while (temp != null && temp.getData() <= heights[i]) {
                temp = temp.getLink();
            }
            if (temp != null) {
                if (temp.getData() <= heights[i]) {
                    list.insertAfterElement(temp.getData(), heights[i]);
                } else {
                    list.insertAtStart(heights[i]);
                }
            } else {
                list.insertAtEnd(heights[i]);
            }
        } else {
            Link temp = list.getHead();
            int pos = tallCount[i];
            while (temp != null
                    && (temp.getData() <= heights[i] || pos-- > 0)) {
                temp = temp.getLink();
            }
            if (temp != null) {
                if (temp.getData() <= heights[i]) {
                    list.insertAfterElement(temp.getData(), heights[i]);
                } else {
                    list.insertBeforeElement(temp.getData(), heights[i]);
                }
            } else {
                list.insertAtEnd(heights[i]);
            }
        }
    }
    Link fin = list.getHead();
    int i = 0;
    while (fin != null) {
        heights[i++] = fin.getData();
        fin = fin.getLink();
    }
    return heights;
}

public class Link {

    private int data;
    private Link link;

    public Link(int data) {
        this.data = data;
    }

    public int getData() {
        return data;
    }

    public void setData(int data) {
        this.data = data;
    }

    public Link getLink() {
        return link;
    }

    public void setLink(Link link) {
        this.link = link;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return this.data + " -> "
                + (this.link != null ? this.link : "null");
    }

}

public class LinkedList {

    private Link head;

    public Link getHead() {
        return head;
    }

    public void insertAtStart(int data) {
        if (head == null) {
            head = new Link(data);
            head.setLink(null);
        } else {
            Link link = new Link(data);
            link.setLink(head);
            head = link;
        }
    }

    public void insertAtEnd(int data) {
        if (head != null) {
            Link temp = head;
            while (temp != null && temp.getLink() != null) {
                temp = temp.getLink();
            }
            temp.setLink(new Link(data));
        } else {
            head = new Link(data);
        }
    }

    public void insertAfterElement(int after, int data) {
        if (head != null) {
            Link temp = head;
            while (temp != null) {
                if (temp.getData() == after) {
                    Link link = new Link(data);
                    link.setLink(temp.getLink());
                    temp.setLink(link);
                    break;
                } else {
                    temp = temp.getLink();
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public void insertBeforeElement(int before, int data) {
        if (head != null) {
            Link current = head;
            Link previous = null;
            Link ins = new Link(data);
            while (current != null) {
                if (current.getData() == before) {
                    ins.setLink(current);
                    break;
                } else {
                    previous = current;
                    current = current.getLink();
                    if (current != null && current.getData() == before) {
                        previous.setLink(ins);
                        ins.setLink(current);
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "LinkedList [head=" + this.head + "]";
    }

}

}

share|improve this answer

As people already corrected for original input:

Heights : A[] = { 5 3 2 6 1 4 }
InFronts: B[] = { 0 1 2 0 3 2 }
Output should look like: X[] = { 5 3 1 6 2 4 }

Here is the O(N*logN) way to approach solution (with assumption that there are no ties).

  1. Iterate over array B and build chain of inequalities (by placing items into a right spot on each iteration, here we can use hashtable for O(1) lookups):
    • b0 > b1
    • b0 > b1 > b2
    • b3 > b0 > b1 > b2
    • b3 > b0 > b1 > b4 > b2
    • b3 > b0 > b5 > b1 > b4 > b2
  2. Sort array A and reverse it
  3. Initialize output array X, iterate over chain from #1 and fill array X by placing items from A into a position defined in a chain

Steps #1 and #3 are O(N), step #2 is the most expensive O(N*logN). And obviously reversing sorted array A (in step #2) is not required.

share|improve this answer

This is the implementation for the idea provided by user1990169. Complexity being O(N^2).

public class Solution {
        class Person implements Comparator<Person>{
            int height;
            int infront;
            public Person(){

            }
            public Person(int height, int infront){
                this.height = height;
                this.infront = infront;
            }
            public int compare(Person p1, Person p2){
                return p1.height - p2.height;
            }
        }

        public ArrayList<Integer> order(ArrayList<Integer> heights, ArrayList<Integer> infronts) {
           int n = heights.size();
           Person[] people = new Person[n];
           for(int i = 0; i < n; i++){
               people[i] = new Person(heights.get(i), infronts.get(i));
           }

           Arrays.sort(people, new Person());


           Person[] rst = new Person[n];
           for(Person p : people){
               int count = 0;
               for(int i = 0; i < n ; i++){
                     if(count == p.infront){
                        while(rst[i] != null && i < n - 1){
                            i++;
                        }
                        rst[i] = p;
                        break;
                    }
                    if(rst[i] == null) count++;
               }

            }
            ArrayList<Integer> heightrst = new ArrayList<Integer>();
            for(int i = 0; i < n; i++){
                heightrst.add(rst[i].height);
            }
            return heightrst;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Was solving this problem today, here is what I came up with:

The idea is to sort the heights array in descending order. Once, we have this sorted array - pick up an element from this element and place it in the resultant array at the corresponding index (I am using an ArrayList for the same, it would be nice to use LinkedList) :

public class Solution {
    public ArrayList<Integer> order(ArrayList<Integer> heights,      ArrayList<Integer> infronts) {
        Person[] persons = new Person[heights.size()];
        ArrayList<Integer> res = new ArrayList<>();

        for (int i = 0; i < persons.length; i++) {
            persons[i] = new Person(heights.get(i), infronts.get(i));
        }

        Arrays.sort(persons, (p1, p2) ->  {
            return Integer.compare(p2.height, p1.height);
        });

        for (int i = 0; i < persons.length; i++) {
            //System.out.println("adding "+persons[i].height+" "+persons[i].count);
            res.add(persons[i].count, persons[i].height);
        }

        return res;
    }


    private static class Person {
        public final int height;
        public final int count;

        public Person(int h, int c) {
            height = h;
            count = c;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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