Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using code generation to generate interfaces that correspond to table definition in a certain database.

Since the database is very messy I get around 500 interfaces (for 500 tables) each with it's own definition.

Some of the interfaces can inherit from each other, and for some a common interface can be extracted to minimize code definition. For example:

interface One
{
    int FirstField { get; set; }
    bool SecondField { get; set; }
    DateTime ThirdField { get; set; }   
}

interface Two
{
    int FirstField { get; set; }
    DateTime ThirdField { get; set; }
    double FourthField { get; set; }
}

I would like to perform some kind of minimization on the code to have minimum amount of it generated (through multiple inheritance and common code extraction). From above example I would need to get something like:

interface OneTwoCommon
{
    int FirstField { get; set; }
    DateTime ThirdField { get; set; }   

}

interface One : OneTwoCommon
{
    bool SecondField { get; set; }
}

interface Two : OneTwoCommon
{
    double FourthField { get; set; }
}

Which branch of algorithms deals with these problems?

Where do I start looking up those algorithms?

I don't even know what to write in Google to get relevant results.

share|improve this question
    
Why would you want to do this. The inheritance-structure may change every time a change is made to the database. Therefore you should not relay on any such auto-generated structure not explicitly defined. You should never touch the generated code, therefore it should not matter, if it is a bit ugly. –  MrSmith42 Oct 4 '13 at 8:23
    
@MrSmith42 I'm doing this mainly because it's an interesting problem, secondly to increase compilation speed, and minimize assembly size. The point is to depend on generated code, so if something major in the DB changes, we get few compile errors in just the right places. –  omittones Oct 4 '13 at 9:21
    
@MrSmith42 Also we will not really depend on common interfaces, just the public ones (full tables). The common ones can be analyzed later to get a sense of what is the same across tables. –  omittones Oct 4 '13 at 9:30

1 Answer 1

I figured out a simple algorithm.

  • define Surface of interface as number of other interfaces that implement it, times the number of properties of that interface
  • the goal is to construct a new interface, with subset of all used properties, with maximum possible surface

Initialization:

  • first we order descedning all properites by number of interfaces that contain it, into LProperties (so most used properties will be on top)
  • select first property (P1) from LProperties, create new interface ITemp with only that property
  • pop P1 from LProperties
  • calculate Surface of ITemp (number of existing interfaces that can implement it times number of properties)

Iteration:

  • select first property from LProperties (now P2), put it in ITemp (note: P2 is not P1 since we popped P1)
  • new Surface
  • new Surface > old Surface, remove P2 from LProperties, save it to ITemp, remember Surface *, remove P2 from ITemp

Iteration:

  • next property from LProperties (now P3), put it in ITemp (note: P2 is still in LProperties, but we already processed it)
  • if new Surface > old Surface remove P3 from LProperties, save it to ITemp, else remove P3 from ITemp
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.