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I'm a longtime python developer and recently have been introduced to Prolog. I love the concept of using relationship rules for certain kinds of tasks, and would like to add this to my repertoire.

Are there any good libraries for logic programming in Python? I've done some searching on Google but only found the following:

jtauber's blog series on relational_python

Would love to compare to some others...thanks!

-aj

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wow man... i got respect for anyone who can even read prolog! +1 –  Perpetualcoder Dec 16 '09 at 20:59
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7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Perhaps you should google "Logic Programming in Python". Pyke looks promising:

Pyke introduces a form of Logic Programming (inspired by Prolog) to the Python community by providing a knowledge-based inference engine (expert system) written in 100% Python.

Unlike Prolog, Pyke integrates with Python allowing you to invoke Pyke from Python and intermingle Python statements and expressions within your expert system rules.

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@Richie, looks like a useful package. Thanks for the pointer! –  AJ. Dec 17 '09 at 3:31
    
from Pyke's page: "Pyke introduces a form of Logic Programming (inspired by Prolog) to the Python community by providing a knowledge-based inference engine (expert system) written in 100% Python." –  heltonbiker Mar 26 '11 at 22:45
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You may want to use pyDatalog, a logic programming library that I developed for Python implementing Datalog. It works with SQLAlchemy to query relational databases using logic clauses.

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You need to disclose that it's your project! –  ThiefMaster Dec 25 '12 at 15:47
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You could also look at Dee, which adds relations to Python: http://www.quicksort.co.uk

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is Dee an implementation of D (as described in Date's books?) –  andrew cooke Sep 7 '11 at 19:14
    
It is (without the object/type specifications) –  greg Sep 9 '11 at 14:14
    
too bad it seems dead. looked promising –  Janus Troelsen Feb 9 '12 at 9:14
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A recent Prolog implementation in Python (or rather RPython) in Pyrolog. It is still rather experimental.

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that's very cool, but does it inter-operate with python? it is written on top of pypy, which also supports (famously) a python implementation, but it's not clear to me that implies inter-op. also, while i am here, blog.herraiz.org/archives/238 is a few years old, but listed various options (it implies pyrolog inter-op, but also sounds like it is simply assumed because of pypy, which is what i am questioning). –  andrew cooke Mar 29 '12 at 17:53
    
Proof-of-concept rather. So going with the soruces might permit that. –  false Mar 29 '12 at 19:09
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Another option is Yield Prolog

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You should also check PyLog:

http://cdsoft.fr/pylog/

It has a very clean and simple syntax and implementation.

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LogPy is an implementation of miniKanren, a relational programming language, in Python. It follows in th tradition of core.logic, the preeminent logic programming solution in Clojure. LogPy was designed for interoperability with pre-existing codebases.

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