Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've started to learn Ubuntu server administration for my own projects. For that purpose I created a config file, which I run on a new server instance for basic installation - for example to install git, nginx, etc. So, for example I copy into a terminal window 3 lines:

pip install flask
pip install gunicorn
pip install pymongo

and the first, and the second will be executed automatically, the the third one will wait for me))

It is possible somehow to execute all this sequence automatically, without pressing the return button for the last command?

share|improve this question
    
Copy a blank line in addition to the three lines! –  devnull Oct 4 '13 at 9:06

3 Answers 3

you'd better do a bash script like :

#!/bin/sh
pip install flask
pip install gunicorn
pip install pymongo

then made it executable with chmod +x script.sh and run ./script.sh

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm..., It makes sense. Thank, I am going to try it right now –  Nodari Lipartiya Oct 4 '13 at 9:47
    
feel free to validate this answer if it solves your problem ;-) –  Mali Oct 4 '13 at 11:51

You can concatenate commands in one line using semi-colon and then copy/paste all the line together:

pip install flask; pip install gunicorn; pip install pymongo

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that is good for a small amount of commandsd. But I wrote an example - in real in that config file there are a lot of strings) So, in this case it is not suitable approach. –  Nodari Lipartiya Oct 4 '13 at 9:45

You can write a shell script with the following contents and save as myscript.sh:

#!/bin/bash
pip install flask
pip install gunicorn
pip install pymongo

Give it execute permissions by: chmod u+x myscript.sh Execute it by: ./myscript.sh

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.