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I'm trying to optimize some code in order to reduce as much as possible execution times. This is the code:

    int shifter=0;

    // now iterate through all the pairings
    UINT32_ALIAS* ptr2=(UINT32_ALIAS*)ptr;
    const BriskShortPair* max=shortPairs_+noShortPairs_;
    for(BriskShortPair* iter=shortPairs_; iter<max;++iter){
        t1=*(_values+iter->i);
        t2=*(_values+iter->j);
        if(t1>t2){
            *ptr2|=((1)<<shifter);

        } // else already initialized with zero
        // take care of the iterators:
        ++shifter;
        if(shifter==32){
            shifter=0;
            ++ptr2;
        }
    }

I was wondering if it's possible to somehow parallelize this using NEON. Is it possible? Thank you

EDIT: The context of this code is the BRISK features detector (http://www.asl.ethz.ch/people/lestefan/personal/BRISK) I'm trying to optimize this code for an ARM architecture. The piece of code I'm referring to has the following structure:

-an external for cycle that scans a certain number of points

-for each one of these points there a certain number of other points around it (a fixed number) and each one of these has an intensity value associated.

-in an internal for cycle fixed pairs of points are compared on the basis of their intensity value and the result of this comparison can be 0 or 1 and this value is put in a vector.

The code I posted here is the internal for cycle.

share|improve this question
    
I'm not asking for code, I'm just trying to understand if there is a way to optimise the original code through NEON. Since I'm no NEON expert I don't even know if what I'm asking it's possible. If it is, I'm going to implement it myself. What I need is just some kind of general advice about the feasibility. –  user2696208 Oct 4 '13 at 9:14
    
Without anymore context / compilable code, the only thing I can suggest at this point is to hint to the compiler that this should be vectorized / would benefit from vectorization. See stackoverflow.com/questions/14256156/… for the options. –  FrankH. Oct 4 '13 at 9:18
1  
I edited the answer adding more context. –  user2696208 Oct 4 '13 at 9:40
    
Yes from the look of the scalar code it's certainly doable, but you have a steep learning curve to deal with if you have not done any SIMD programming before. It looks like you're just generating an array of bits whose values depend on the comparison of two vectors. I suggest looking at some of the NEON answers on SO as a starting point. BTW, what are the types of iter->i and iter->j ? –  Paul R Oct 4 '13 at 10:36
    
@PaulR The types are int. " It looks like you're just generating an array of bits whose values depend on the comparison of two vectors.". That's exactly what the code does. Do you think I could obtain a significant increase in the performances? Since it's not an easy thing for me to do I'd like to understand if it's worth the effort. –  user2696208 Oct 4 '13 at 10:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

EDIT : I initially misunderstood the original source code. Here is the correct version, completely rewritten. (55 cycles / iteration)

Although it's not as easy as assumed with the initial version below, NEON can handle this extremely well, resulting in an eye-popping performance boost compared to the original C implementation.

With the right tweaks, you might get additional gain in performance (less than 50 cycles / iteration). The readability will suffer heavily then though.

Have fun!

    AREA    BRISK_ASM_NEON, CODE, READNOLY
    EXPORT  yourFunction
    CODE32

yourFunction    FUNCTION

loop
    pld     [r0, #192]
    vld2.32     {q8, q9}, [r0]!
    vld2.32     {q10, q11}, [r0]!
    pld     [r0, #192]
    vld2.32     {q12, q13}, [r0]!
    vld2.32     {q14, q15}, [r0]!

    vcgt.u32    q8, q8, q9
    vcgt.u32    q9, q10, q11
    vcgt.u32    q10, q12, q13
    vcgt.u32    q11, q14, q15

    pld     [r0, #192]
    vld2.32     {q12, q13}, [r0]!
    vld2.32     {q14, q15}, [r0]!
    pld     [r0, #192]
    vld2.32     {q0, q1}, [r0]!
    vld2.32     {q2, q3}, [r0]!

    vcgt.u32    q12, q12, q13
    vcgt.u32    q13, q14, q15
    vcgt.u32    q14, q0, q1
    vcgt.u32    q15, q2, q3

    vsli.32     q8, q10, #8
    vsli.32     q9, q11, #8
    vsli.32     q8, q12, #16
    vsli.32     q9, q13, #16
    vsli.32     q8, q14, #24
    vsli.32     q9, q15, #24

    vsli.8      d16, d17, #2
    vsli.8      d18, d19, #2
    vsli.8      d16, d18, #4

    vbic.i8     d16, #0xaa
    vshr.u64    d17, d16, #31
    vorr        d16, d16, d17

    vst1.32     {d16[0]}, [r1]!

    subs        r2, r2, #32
    bgt     loop

    bx  lr

    ENDFUNC
    END

=============================================================================

!!!!!!! The code below is INVALID !!!!!!!!

=============================================================================

It's a piece of cake with NEON.

Here's your "miracle" :

prototype : void yourFunc(unsigned int * pPair, unsigned int * ptr2, unsigned int count);

    AREA    BRISK_ASM_NEON, CODE, READNOLY
    EXPORT  yourFunction
    CODE32

yourFunction    FUNCTION
    adr r12, shifter_table
    vpush   {q4-q7}
    vldmia  r12, {q0-q7}

loop
    vld1.32 {q8, q9}, [r1]
    vorr    q10, q8, q0
    vorr    q11, q9, q1
    vld2.32 {q12, q13}, [r0]!
    vld2.32 {q14, q15}, [r0]!
    vcgt.u32    q12, q12, q13
    vcgt.u32    q13, q14, q15
    vbsl    q12, q10, q8
    vbsl    q13, q11, q9
    vst1.32 {q12, q13}, [r1]!

    vld1.32 {q8, q9}, [r1]
    vorr    q10, q8, q2
    vorr    q11, q9, q3
    vld2.32 {q12, q13}, [r0]!
    vld2.32 {q14, q15}, [r0]!
    vcgt.u32    q12, q12, q13
    vcgt.u32    q13, q14, q15
    vbsl    q12, q10, q8
    vbsl    q13, q11, q9
    vst1.32 {q12, q13}, [r1]!

    vld1.32 {q8, q9}, [r1]
    vorr    q10, q8, q4
    vorr    q11, q9, q5
    vld2.32 {q12, q13}, [r0]!
    vld2.32 {q14, q15}, [r0]!
    vcgt.u32    q12, q12, q13
    vcgt.u32    q13, q14, q15
    vbsl    q12, q10, q8
    vbsl    q13, q11, q9
    vst1.32 {q12, q13}, [r1]!

    vld1.32 {q8, q9}, [r1]
    vorr    q10, q8, q6
    vorr    q11, q9, q7
    vld2.32 {q12, q13}, [r0]!
    vld2.32 {q14, q15}, [r0]!
    vcgt.u32    q12, q12, q13
    vcgt.u32    q13, q14, q15
    vbsl    q12, q10, q8
    vbsl    q13, q11, q9
    vst1.32 {q12, q13}, [r1]!

    subs    r2, #32
    bgt loop

    vpop    {q4-q7}
    bx  lr

    ENDFUNC

shifter_table
    DCD (1<<00), (1<<01), (1<<02), (1<<03), (1<<04), (1<<05), (1<<06), (1<<07), (1<<08), (1<<09), (1<<10), (1<<11), (1<<12), (1<<13), (1<<14), (1<<15)
    DCD (1<<16), (1<<17), (1<<18), (1<<19), (1<<20), (1<<21), (1<<22), (1<<23), (1<<24), (1<<25), (1<<26), (1<<27), (1<<28), (1<<29), (1<<30), (1<<31)

    END

The code above is just moderately optimized (interlocks here and there), and works only if count is a multiple of 32.

That's as far as I go managing readability and when working "unprofessionally".

47 cycles / iteration isn't bad. The rest is up to you.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I really want to understand the code now and then try it. Is there a good manual for these instructions? –  user2696208 Oct 5 '13 at 7:50
1  
Visit my blog armneon.blogspot.com There are some links in addition to my own tutorials. –  Jake 'Alquimista' LEE Oct 5 '13 at 7:59
    
@user2696208 I did a graving mistake in misinterpreting your code. I'm updating my answer with a "revised" version. –  Jake 'Alquimista' LEE Oct 6 '13 at 1:12
1  
done updating the code –  Jake 'Alquimista' LEE Oct 6 '13 at 6:15
2  
1) A structure consisting of two integers is internally nothing else than an integer array of size two, and an array of this structure is again an integer array as a whole. Simple typecasting will do. Should it contain other elements, it would be wise separating them in an additional structure 2) On ARMv7, a cache line typically consists of 64 bytes. And it's advised that you read three lines ahead. Since a single iteration is rather long in this function, it might be possible that reading two lines ahead instead of three results in better performance (128 instead of 192) –  Jake 'Alquimista' LEE Oct 7 '13 at 1:38

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