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Scenario: I am parsing an IL and want to convert from a stackbased representation to a CFG for instance.

My IL consists of multiple operations like PushInt(value), Pop etc. The question is now which implementation would be correct in terms of Scala. I would love to use case classes/objects or extractors so that I can write code alà

op match {
  case PushInt(x) => doSomethingWith x
  case Pop => ...
}

Now the problem exists with a sequence like PushInt(1) :: PushInt(1) :: Pop :: Pop since PushInt(1) is equal to PushInt(1) and I can not add multiple (equal) operations into a collection. However I know I am throwing some information away which is the position in the flow, but this is implicitly stored as te index in the sequence.

  • One possible solution is to override the hashCode method and break the rules of equal/hashCode. I am not really happy with that.

  • Another option is to have a "creation time" counter that is stored in the abstract base so that case class PushInt(value: Int) extends AbstractOp(AbstractOp.nextIndex)

  • Use extractors but in that case I will miss nice features like the implementation of hashCode, equals, toString and more important the check for an exhaustive match.

So my question is now how to model my structure according to my requirements. Is any of the possible solutions "correct" in terms of Scala?

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1  
You can't add multiple equal operations into a collection? Isn't that the case only if the collection is a Set? –  Carl Smotricz Dec 16 '09 at 21:30
1  
No, and it is even worse to ask for indexOf in the sequence. Which is of course correct if objects are equal. –  Joa Ebert Dec 16 '09 at 21:38
1  
You can certainly have repeated identical elements in a List. –  Randall Schulz Dec 16 '09 at 21:39
2  
Use of explicitly defined extractors vs. using case classes is orthogonal to the compiler check of exhaustive matching. It depends on the sealed keyword in the definition of the type of the instance being matched against. –  Mitch Blevins Dec 16 '09 at 21:52
1  
Joa, this question is too vague, makes too many assumptions. What is an IL? Why can't you add multiple equal operations to a collection? And what, exactly, are you trying to do? Your requirements, to be blunt, were not stated. –  Daniel C. Sobral Dec 16 '09 at 22:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First, let's address the problem of finding the exact instance you want:

scala> trait AbstractOp
defined trait AbstractOp

scala> case class Pop() extends AbstractOp {
     |   override def equals(other: Any) = other match {
     |     case that: Pop => this eq that
     |     case _ => false
     |   }
     | }
defined class Pop

scala> case class PushInt(val i: Int) extends AbstractOp {
     |   override def equals(other: Any) = other match {
     |     case that: PushInt => this eq that
     |     case _ => false
     |   }
     | }
defined class PushInt

scala> val l = List(PushInt(1), PushInt(1), Pop(), Pop())
l: List[Product with AbstractOp] = List(PushInt(1), PushInt(1), Pop(), Pop())

scala> val op = l(1)
op: Product with AbstractOp = PushInt(1)

scala> println( l.indexOf( op ) )
1

That, of course, mean PushInt(1) != PushInt(1), unless it is the exact same instance of PushInt(1). It doesn't break equals/hashCode contract because a.equals(b) => a.hashCode == b.hashCode, but a.hashCode == b.hashCode doesn't imply anything. But if your only use is finding that instance, try this instead:

scala> case class Pop() extends AbstractOp
defined class Pop

scala> case class PushInt(val i: Int) extends AbstractOp
defined class PushInt

scala> val l = List(PushInt(1), PushInt(1), Pop(), Pop())
l: List[Product with AbstractOp] = List(PushInt(1), PushInt(1), Pop(), Pop())

scala> val op = l(1)
op: Product with AbstractOp = PushInt(1)

scala> println( l.findIndexOf( op eq _ ) )
1

Either way, if you reinsert that instance in the list you'll have trouble. You have to make sure that each instance you insert is unique. You might even write your own collection, either throwing an exception if a repeated instance is inserted, or make a copy of any instance passed to it (easy enough with case classes and copy method on Scala 2.8).

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Daniel, what about the mapping problem if I would use your second suggestion? I think it does not work, so I should override equals probably, right? –  Joa Ebert Dec 18 '09 at 10:28
    
What mapping problem? (reads Patrick) Oh, right. Yes, there is that. In that case, you may override equals and create an alternate comparison operator for those times you want Push(1) == Push(1). Something like =~=, for instance. –  Daniel C. Sobral Dec 18 '09 at 11:29
    
For the first solution, please note that you need not check the type of that given that you'll check for identity afterwards. Therefore it is enough to have: override def equals(other: Any) = this eq other –  Blaisorblade Mar 26 '11 at 21:56
    
@Blaisorblade Have you tried it? It's a type mismatch, because eq requires AnyRef, but equals is defined over Any. –  Daniel C. Sobral Mar 27 '11 at 15:56
    
No you're right, I'm used to non-Scala, where it's not so tricky to get it right. Anyway, you can still write this code: case class PushInt(val i: Int) { override def equals(other: Any) = other.asInstanceOf[AnyRef] eq this } which is shorter and avoids generating any run-time cast. At runtime, instances of AnyValue are already boxed, so the cast above is only to make the type-checker happy, but nothing more. –  Blaisorblade Mar 30 '11 at 19:52

If Joa don't mind ;) Imagine a code like that:

trait AbstractOp
case class Pop() extends AbstractOp
case class PushInt(val i:Int) extends AbstractOp

now we construct a list representing a sequence of a program instructions

val l=List(PushInt(1), PushInt(1), Pop(), Pop())

First problem : you want to get the index of an operation

val op=l(1) // get the second operation for example
// now you want to get back the index for the op you are using
println( l.indexOf( op1 ) ) // you will get 0 and not 1

Second problem : you want to map each operation from the previous list to a value, this will fail since equals will not distinguish the two Pop, or the two PushInt.

P.S. Of course it is not an answer, i haven`t found how to post this under the others comments feel free to move it at the right place

share|improve this answer
    
You can't make comments very big, and you can't format code in them. You did the best thing possible under the circumstances, and since you're helping to clarify I doubt anyone will mind. –  Carl Smotricz Dec 17 '09 at 6:37
    
Patrick has explained the requirements very well. Thank you! –  Joa Ebert Dec 17 '09 at 9:12
    
I rephrased the second problems to mention equals(). Inserting different objects with the same hash-code in a HahsMap is only a performance problem. –  Blaisorblade Mar 26 '11 at 21:53

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