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I'm studying Objc with the book from BigNerdRanch 'Objective-C Programming from Aaron Hillegass' and there's this thing that keeps puzzling me.

I understand that the complier needs to know what kind of variable I'm talking about so i have to declare the var type before assigning a value.

int myNum = 10;

Fine. But when it comes to ObjC classes, what's the reason for declaring the type of pointer if I have to declare it right after the =, when I alloc and init it?

NSDateFormatter *dateFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];

Obviously the *dateFormatter object is an istance of NSDateFormatter, I wrote it in the allocation. Why do i have to declare it at the beginning too? 'Cause if I try to do something like

NSString *timeZone = [NSTimeZone systemTimeZone];

Xcode clearly warns me with 'Incompatible pointer types initializing 'NSString *' with an expression of type 'NSTimeZone *'.

I feel like I'm missing something. Sorry if it's a dumb question, trying to learn.

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It's just the syntax of C, which Objective-C has inherited. Don't worry about it - it's not important. – Paul R Oct 4 '13 at 11:02
1  
@PaulR: It actually is important—there's a significant benefit to statically typing a variable versus declaring it as id. See my answer: stackoverflow.com/a/19190202/30461 – Peter Hosey Oct 4 '13 at 20:38
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here the real question is rather "Why do I have to define the correct class of the pointer?"...

The answer is: you may want to use the variable in some other context as well. If you message [NSTimeZone systemTimeZone] directly, then the compiler may be able to deduce the type, but what if you message the variable? If you go with the weaker-typed

id tz = [NSTimeZone systemTimeZone];

then there's much less opportunity for the compiler to check for errors if you use tz where an NSTimeZone * is expected than it could if you declared it as NSTimeZone *tz.

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Thanks, it's much more clear with this perspective. – qohelet Oct 4 '13 at 12:09
    
@H2CO3 Offtopic, but grats to 100k ;) – HAS Nov 2 '13 at 6:35
    
@HAS Thank you! :-) – user529758 Nov 2 '13 at 6:36

As an even clearer example, suppose you have a method:

- (NSTimeZone *) userSpecifiedTimeZone {
    id timeZone = [NSTimeZone timeZoneWithAbbreviation:self.timeZoneName];
    if (timeZone == nil)
        timeZone = [NSTimeZone timeZoneWithName:self.timeZoneName];
    if (timeZone == nil)
        timeZone = self.timeZoneName;
    return timeZone;
}

See the bug?

Xcode won't catch it, since it's perfectly valid to assign any object to a variable of type id, and to return an id from a method whose return type is any object type, and to subsequently assign that id to another id variable, or try to send messages to it, in the calling code.

You'll find this bug—if you don't catch it early with your own human eyes—only at run time, and only when the user enters a bogus time zone name, and you then try to use that time zone name (wrongly returned as this method's result) as an NSTimeZone object.

Compare to the statically-typed version:

- (NSTimeZone *) userSpecifiedTimeZone {
    NSTimeZone *timeZone = [NSTimeZone timeZoneWithAbbreviation:self.timeZoneName];
    if (timeZone == nil)
        timeZone = [NSTimeZone timeZoneWithName:self.timeZoneName];
    if (timeZone == nil)
        timeZone = self.timeZoneName; //Clang calls shenanigans here
    return timeZone;
}

Clang rightly objects that assigning an NSString * to a variable typed as NSTimeZone * is suspicious.

You don't have to define the class of the pointer, but the potential otherwise for bugs like the one shown above is why we do it.

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But when it comes to ObjC classes, what's the reason for declaring the type of pointer if I have to declare it right after the =, when I alloc and init it?

NSDateFormatter *dateFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];

You're not declaring the type of pointer twice. There's a lot going on in this statement. The first occurrence of 'NSDateFormatter' is telling the compiler that dataformatter is a pointer to this type of object, whereas the second occurrence of 'NSDateFormatter' is calling the 'alloc' method in the NSDateFormatter class. Same word, two completely different meanings.

The first thing that happens is [NSDateFormatter alloc] which is calling the (class) method 'alloc' in the 'NSDateFormatter' class. This returns an (empty) instance of an NSDateFormatter object in which the method 'init' is called. A pointer to the resultant object is then stored in your 'dateFormatter' variable, and we tell the compiler that this is a pointer to an NSDateFormatter object.

Think of it like this:

NSDateFormatter *dateFormatter;    Create a pointer to an NSDateFormatter object.
newDate = [NSDateFormatter alloc]; Create an empty NSDateFormatter object by calling the class method alloc in NSDateFormatter 
[newDate init];                    Initialise it by calling the onject's 'init' method
dateformatter = *newDate;          Assign a pointer to it to my variable.
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