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I have the following folder hierarchy inside my solution folder:

Solution Name
    - Program.cs
    - Folder 1
        - File1.cs

How can I run the File1.cs (Windows Form) inside the Program.cs?

I tried updating the syntax inside the Program.cs file:

Application.Run(Solution_Name.Folder_1.File.cs); but it's not working.

Solution:

The syntax I was looking for is:

Application.Run(new Solution_Name.Folder_1.File1());

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1  
What's File1? is it your form? –  King King Oct 4 '13 at 11:09
    
@KingKing Yes, it is. –  abramlimpin Oct 4 '13 at 11:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem looks with correct path.

1- First check the namespace where form is located. open the File1.cs and see what name space it is in. 2- Use the full path to form Application.Run(new Solution_Name.Folder_1.File());

The syntax looks correct but there may be issue with namespace where you are looking for in question form.

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Try this:

//Suppose your File1 form class has the same name with the File1.cs containing it.
Application.Run(new Folder_1.File1());

Or even better, you should add some using declaration and access your File1 class directly like this:

using Folder_1;
//...
Application.Run(new File1());

NOTE: each folder in the project will be treated as a namespace.

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Have you tried

 Application.Run(new  File1());

I am able to run it succesfully

or you can also add

  using Solution_Name.Folder_1;

I dont think there can exist more than one form with the same name irrespective of it's location

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Erm, you can't, certainly not like this. In order to run c# code you have to compile it first. .cs is just a source file, it's not runable on it's own..

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