Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on MySQL 5.5.29-0ubuntu0.12.04.1.

I have the need to create a query that can sort results by date and by a score.

I read the documentation and the posts here on stackoverflow (specifically this) about how to optimize a query but I'm still struggling to do it well. The key findings is that to avoid the use of a temporary table the ORDER BY or GROUP BY must contains only columns from the first table in the join queue, so that's why the use of the STRAIGHT_JOIN clause and the two slightly different queries.

To avoid confusion, I'm going to assign a number to various query configuration:

  1. order by date with STRAIGHT_JOIN clause
  2. order by score with STRAIGHT_JOIN clause
  3. order by date without STRAIGHT_JOIN clause
  4. order by score without STRAIGHT_JOIN clause

Following is query 1, takes about 2.5 seconds to complete:

SELECT STRAIGHT_JOIN item.id AS id
FROM item 
INNER JOIN score ON item.id = score.item_id 
LEFT JOIN url ON item.url_id = url.id 
LEFT JOIN doc ON url.doc_id = doc.id 
INNER JOIN feed ON feed.id = item.feed_id 
INNER JOIN user_feed ON feed.id = user_feed.feed_id AND score.user_id = user_feed.user_id 
LEFT JOIN star ON item.id = star.item_id AND score.user_id = star.user_id 
JOIN unseen ON item.id = unseen.item_id AND score.user_id = unseen.user_id 
WHERE score.user_id = 1 AND user_feed.id = 7 
ORDER BY zen_time DESC 
LIMIT 0, 10

Following is query 2 (first join tables are inverted and the ordering column is different), takes only about 0.01 seconds to complete:

SELECT STRAIGHT_JOIN item.id AS id
FROM score
INNER JOIN item ON item.id = score.item_id 
LEFT JOIN url ON item.url_id = url.id 
LEFT JOIN doc ON url.doc_id = doc.id 
INNER JOIN feed ON feed.id = item.feed_id 
INNER JOIN user_feed ON feed.id = user_feed.feed_id AND score.user_id = user_feed.user_id 
LEFT JOIN star ON item.id = star.item_id AND score.user_id = star.user_id 
JOIN unseen ON item.id = unseen.item_id AND score.user_id = unseen.user_id 
WHERE score.user_id = 1 AND user_feed.id = 7 
ORDER BY score DESC 
LIMIT 0, 10

Following are the EXPLAIN results for the queries.

Explain for query 1: enter image description here

Explain for query 2: enter image description here

Explain for query 3: enter image description here

Explain for query 4: enter image description here

Profiler result for query 1: enter image description here

Profiler result for query 2: enter image description here

Profiler result for query 3: enter image description here

Profiler result for query 4: enter image description here

Following are tables definitions:

CREATE TABLE `doc` (
`id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`md5` char(32) DEFAULT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
KEY `Md5_index` (`md5`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE `feed` (
`id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`url` text NOT NULL,
`title` text,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
FULLTEXT KEY `Title_url_index` (`title`,`url`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE `item` (
`id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`feed_id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL,
`url_id` bigint(20) unsigned DEFAULT NULL,
`md5` char(32) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
KEY `Md5_index` (`md5`),
KEY `Zen_time_index` (`zen_time`),
KEY `Feed_index` (`feed_id`),
KEY `Url_index` (`url_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE `score` (
`id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`user_id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL,
`item_id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL,
`score` float DEFAULT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
UNIQUE KEY `User_item_index` (`user_id`,`item_id`),
KEY Score_index (`score`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE `star` (
`id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`user_id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL,
`item_id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
UNIQUE KEY `User_item_index` (`user_id`,`item_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE `unseen` (
`id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`user_id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL,
`item_id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
UNIQUE KEY `User_item_index` (`user_id`,`item_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE `url` (
`id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`doc_id` bigint(20) unsigned DEFAULT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
KEY Doc_index (`doc_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE `user` (
`id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`email` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
KEY `IDX_Email` (`email`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE `user_feed` (
`id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`user_id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL,
`feed_id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
KEY `User_feed_index` (`user_id`,`feed_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

Here are the row counts for the tables involved in the query:

Score: 68657
Item: 197602
Url: 198354
Doc: 186113
Feed: 754
User_feed: 721
Star: 0
Unseen: 150762

Which approach should I take since my program needs to be able to order results both by zen_time and score in the fastest way possible?

share|improve this question
    
How long do query 3 and query 4 take to execute? You have only said about queries 1 and 2. –  GarethD Oct 4 '13 at 11:42
    
Why does query 2 have the join tables inverted? Query 2 is much faster because the first thing it does is uses your where clause to filter on score BEFORE doing any joins, while Query 1 has to try to join all (unfiltered) items.. –  StevieG Oct 4 '13 at 12:02
    
@GarethD Sorry, forgot to add them. They are as fast as query 2 –  Andrea Oct 4 '13 at 12:43
    
@StevieG According to MySQL doc pointed out in the Stack Overflow question I linked, the ORDER BY column must be one of the first table in the join, so when I order by score.score I put score table as the first one in the join, when I order by item.zen_time I put item as the first one in the join. –  Andrea Oct 4 '13 at 12:43
    
So if you run query 2 with the order by changed to ORDER BY zen_time DESC, your performance is worse? –  StevieG Oct 4 '13 at 12:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Due to the different query speeds I decided to make an even more accurate analysis based on the various results I want to achieve.

The result sets I need are four:

  1. Select all the items from a specific feed, order them by SCORE.score (intelligent order)
  2. Select all the items from a specific feed, order them by ITEM.zen_time (time order)
  3. Select all the items, order them by SCORE.score (intelligent order)
  4. Select all the items, order them by ITEM.zen_time (time order)

The query so has to be adapted to those conditions, and its variable parts are:

  • STRAIGHT_JOIN yes/no
  • First JOIN table score/item
  • WHERE condition on specific feed yes/no
  • ORDER BY score/zen_time

All of the tests have been executed with the SELECT SQL_NO_CACHE instruction.

Following are the results: enter image description here

Now it's clear what I have to do:

  1. No STRAIGHT_JOIN, first JOIN table SCORE
  2. No STRAIGHT_JOIN, first JOIN table SCORE
  3. STRAIGHT_JOIN (I did beat MySQL engine here :D ), first JOIN table SCORE
  4. STRAIGHT_JOIN (I did beat MySQL engine here :D ), first JOIN table ITEM
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.