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I have 2 questions.

First - Are string declared as such in obj-c

@property (nonatomic, copy) NSString *name;
@property (nonatomic, copy) NSString *city;

Are those (nonatomic, copy) right or should I use (nonatomic, strong), or something else ?

Second - If I want to set custom initializer for above strings do I use

-(id)initWithName:(NSString *)n andCity:(NSString *)c
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        self.name = n;
        self.city = c;
    }
}

or should I use:

-(id)initWithName:(NSString *)n andCity:(NSString *)c
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        self.name = [n copy]
        self.city = [c copy];
    }
}

As I can see both ways seem to work for both questions but I'm sure one is more correct than the other, so I wanted to ask which should I use to write correct code in further projects.

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First - it doesn't really matter if you use copy or strong. Personally i prefer to copy strings rather than retain them

Second - `

-(id)initWithName:(NSString *)n andCity:(NSString *)c

   {
      self = [super init];
       if (self) {
          self.name = n;
          self.city = c;
  }
}`

You don't need to use copy message once more cause your properties will copy n and c. If you apply your second piece of code you'll copy n and c twice and have a memory leak

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It very much does matter if you use copy vs. strong. Use strong and I can pass you an instance of NSMutableString and then change it out from under you after the fact. This is why value semantic properties should always be copy. Immutable objects will implement -copyWithZone: by doing return [self retain]; so as to not actually create a second copy when it's not needed. –  ipmcc Oct 4 '13 at 12:04

You want to use copy for value-semantic-typed properties. (Of which NSString is always one.) Otherwise, I can pass you an instance of NSMutableString and then change it out from under you after the fact. Immutable objects will implement -copyWithZone: by doing return [self retain]; so as to not actually create a second copy when it's not needed. See also: NSString property: copy or retain?

In terms of your -init method, you want to avoid using the property setters like you have since they could be overridden in a subclass to do something unforeseeable by your class. So assuming default auto-ivar-synthesis naming pattern, you would want to do this:

-(id)initWithName:(NSString *)n andCity:(NSString *)c
{
    if (self = [super init])
    {
        _name = [n copy];
        _city = [c copy];
    }
    return self;
}

It's a subtle thing, and it won't often be a problem, but if you continue to use inherently-virtual property setters in -init and -dealloc methods, over a long enough timeline, you will get burned by this (can you tell I've been burned by this?)

As for leaked memory, if you're using ARC, doing something like self.foo = [bar copy]; when foo is a copy property will result in copy getting called twice, and potentially two copies being made, but ARC should take care of properly releasing the redundant/intermediate copy, and there should not be a memory leak.

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i think this answer must be accepted rather than mine –  Andrey Chernukha Oct 4 '13 at 13:41

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