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I have a legacy (several years old) WinForms project that's currently in .NET 4.0. Most of the current data retrieval uses the BackgroundWorker class/pattern for asynchronous retrieval, but I'm in the middle of adding some new functionality and wanted to use the async pattern (by way of the Async Targeting Pack). The approach works fine in the development and testing environment, but some (a non-trivial number) of our users are getting errors in the program that seem to be related to threading; specifically what you might see if you had something other than the UI thread modifying UI-bound data.

An example of one of the legacy controls would be:

public class LegacyControl
{
    public void LoadData(int id)
    {
        while(isLoading)
        {
            Application.DoEvents();
            Thread.Sleep(50);
        }

        isLoading = true;

        currentId = id;

        worker.RunWorkerAsync(id);
    }

    private bool isLoading;
    private int currentId;
    private object myData;

    private void worker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        myData = RetrieveData(currentId);
    }

    private void worker_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        bindingSource.DataSource = myData;
    }
}

An example of one of the new controls would be:

public class NewControl
{
    public void LoadData(int id)
    {
        LoadDataAsync(id).ContinueWithErrorHandling(); // custom extension method to generically handle unhandled task exceptions.
    }

    private async Task LoadDataAsync(int id)
    {
        var data = await RetrieveSomeOtherDataAsync(id);

        bindingSource.DataSource = data;
    }
}

While I'm dubious about this possibility, I'm pulling my hair out trying to figure out what's going on here. Is there any possibility that using async/await is somehow messing up the BackgroundWorker and, say, causing its RunWorkerCompleted event to run on the background thread instead of the UI thread?

I can try removing the TPL code, but as I cannot reproduce the errant behavior in my environment, I don't really have any way of testing.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

async won't mess with BackgroundWorker at all. BackgroundWorker is its own completely independent thread.

The most suspect part of the code you posted is DoEvents. This creates a nested message loop, so you have to think about your entire application and ensure that any UI event handler (and async continuation) you have will work correctly if called from that method.

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I agree, but the fact that this problem appeared exactly when the first use of async/await was introduced is difficult to ignore. While I agree that DoEvents should be avoided, and I don't use it myself, these components have existed this way for several years. –  Adam Robinson Oct 4 '13 at 14:59
1  
Reentrancy bugs are extremely common, and DoEvents will surface these bugs dependent on a hundred other things such as machine load, third-party applications, CPU power, and pretty much anything that affects the precise timing of code. So it could be caused by some obscure timing that is slightly different when you added the async components, but my money is on the core problem being in DoEvents. –  Stephen Cleary Oct 4 '13 at 16:54

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