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How can I create a custom property for my .Net assembly which would then be visible under the Details tab in Windows explorer?

Something to sit parallel with "File Description", "Type", "Product Version"... etc

Update: To quote my comment to Lars ... "Whilst I would have liked to do this from within Visual studio, that is certainly not my priority. Actually I hope to integrate any solution into an existing nant build process. So affecting the assemblies post compile is entirely acceptable. Have you ever heard of such a tool?"

Further Update: I'm not sure if what I'm talking about is an attribute or not, to clarify a little what I would like to creat in an entry in the following property page...

alt text

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Don't you mean custom attribute instead of property? –  Lars Truijens Oct 10 '08 at 21:47
    
Updated question with screen-shot –  Rory Becker Oct 13 '08 at 11:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your compiler does not support it. AssemblyFileVersionAttribute and all work because the compiler generates a win32 resource in your assembly called VERSIONINFO with that information in it. That is what windows is reading. Other attributes are just saved as metadata along with your code.

You could make a tool to change the VERSIONINFO resource after you compile.

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Whilst I would have liked to do this from within Visual studio. that is certainly not my priority. Actually I hope to integrate any solution into a nant build process. so affecting the assemblies post compile is entirely acceptable. Have you ever heard of such a tool? –  Rory Becker Oct 13 '08 at 10:50
    
Any resource editor could do that. Like heaventools.com/rtconsole-update-version-info.htm –  Lars Truijens Oct 13 '08 at 13:25

Its not the answer yet, but one 1/2 way hack is to use:

[assembly: AssemblyDescription("One Line of Content Here")]

And that shows up under "Comments".

(still researching, this is something I've wanted for a while.)

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I get the distinct impression this isn't possible through visual studio. my google-fu is not weak, and the internet does not seem to currently hold the answer. –  KyleLanser Oct 10 '08 at 16:13

I believe those properties are stored in a "named stream" a.k.a. "seconary stream". That is, it's a data store that sits parallel to the actual file contents within an NTFS drive.

I have wanted to do exactly as you say for a long time, but MSDN has poor-to-no documentation on the named streams, and it looks like some kind of voo-doo magic that only the people on the Microsoft Office team know how to manipulate. A couple of months ago I was able to get a command-line stream to read and write to that data, but it was a fragile thing that used some secondary behavior of an obscure command (I don't remmeber exactly), and it was not at all applicable in the general case.

It is very frustrating.

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No, the things the topic starter is talking about sits in the VERSION_INFO resource. –  Lars Truijens Oct 10 '08 at 21:38
    
Well, that certainly explains why I have never been able to get it to work! –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Oct 10 '08 at 22:40

The only tool that can control any field of VERSIONINFO structure from the command line and hence is able to add an additional property during a build process is Resource Tuner Console:
http://www.reseditor.com/rtc-solution-version-info.htm

The $199 price seems a bit high... but if you don't want to spend days mucking around with C/C++ then it's a steal.

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