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I wrote a kernel module that needs to push messages to user space. The idea is that the kernel module buffers the message and signals the user space program, then the user space program goes and gets the message by requesting it over a netlink socket. My problem is that after buffering 90 messages, the machine locks and I need to restart. I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong, and I'm using linked lists elsewhere in the kernel module successfully.

//
// A message from the kernel space to user space.
//
typedef struct CoreLinkMessage
{

    unsigned int id;
    char* data;
    unsigned int length;

    struct list_head list; // kernel's list structure

} CoreLinkMessage;

This function initializes the list and semaphore:

// Constructor
void
ctsRtNetlinkSystem_init( void )
{
    sema_init(&cmd_sem_, 1);    
    INIT_LIST_HEAD(&cmd_list_.list);
}

This is the function that must be causing the problem. It simply pushes an item on to the tail of the linked list. If I comment out adding items to the linked list and only call a signal, the program runs indefinitely, so I don't think the problem is the signaling.

//
// Allows the kernel module to buffer messages until requested by
// the user space
//
void
ctsRtNetlinkSystem_addMessage(char* data, unsigned int length)
{

    CoreLinkMessage* msg;
    int sem_ret;
    BOOL doSignal = FALSE;

    //
    // LOCK the semaphore
    //
    sem_ret = down_interruptible(&cmd_sem_);

    if ( !sem_ret )
    {

    msg = (CoreLinkMessage*)kmalloc(sizeof(CoreLinkMessage), GFP_KERNEL );
    if ( msg == NULL )
    {
        PRINTF(CTSMSG_INFO
            "ctsRtNetlinkSystem_addMessage failed to allocate memory! \n" );
        goto unlock;
    }
            memset( msg, 0, sizeof(CoreLinkMessage) );
            msg->data = (char*)kmalloc( length, GFP_KERNEL );
    if ( msg->data == NULL )
    {                        
        kfree( msg );
        PRINTF(CTSMSG_INFO
            "ctsRtNetlinkSystem_addMessage failed to allocate data memory!\n" );
        goto unlock;
    }

    memcpy( msg->data, data, length );
    msg->length = length;

    lastMessageId_ += 1;
    msg->id = lastMessageId_;

    list_add_tail(&(msg->list), &cmd_list_.list);   
    doSignal = TRUE;

unlock:

    up( &cmd_sem_ );

    if ( doSignal )
        sendMessageSignal( msg->id );


    }
    else
    {
    PRINTF(CTSMSG_INFO
        "CtsRtNetlinkSystem_addMessage -- failed to get semaphore\n" );
    }


}




//
// Signal the user space that a message is waiting. Pass along the message
// id
//
static BOOL
sendMessageSignal( unsigned int id )
{
    int ret;
    struct siginfo info;
    struct task_struct *t;

    memset(&info, 0, sizeof(struct siginfo));
    info.si_signo = SIGNAL_MESSAGE;
    info.si_code = SI_QUEUE;    // this is bit of a trickery: 
                            // SI_QUEUE is normally used by sigqueue 
                            // from user space,
                            // and kernel space should use SI_KERNEL. 
                            // But if SI_KERNEL is used the real_time data 
                            // is not delivered to the user space signal 
                            // handler function. 

    // tell the user space application the index of the message
    // real time signals may have 32 bits of data.
    info.si_int = id;       

    rcu_read_lock();

    //find the task_struct associated with this pid
    t = // find_task_by_pid_type( PIDTYPE_PID, registeredPid_ );  
    // find_task_by_pid_type_ns(PIDTYPE_PID, nr, &init_pid_ns);
    pid_task(find_vpid(registeredPid_), PIDTYPE_PID); 
    if(t == NULL)
    {
    PRINTF(CTSMSG_INFO
        "CtsRtNetlinkSystem::sendMessageSignal -- no such pid\n");
    rcu_read_unlock();
    registeredPid_ = 0;
    return FALSE;
    }

    rcu_read_unlock();

    //send the signal
    ret = send_sig_info(SIGNAL_MESSAGE, &info, t);    
    if (ret < 0) 
    {
    PRINTF(CTSMSG_INFO
        "CtsRtNetlinkSystem::sendMessageSignal -- \n"
        "\t error sending signal %d \n", ret );
    return FALSE;
    }

    return TRUE;    
}

I'm currently testing the program on a VM, so I created a timer that ticks every 7 seconds and adds a message to the buffer.

//
// Create a timer to call the process thread
// with nanosecond resolution.
//

static void
createTimer(void)
{
    hrtimer_init(
    &processTimer_,     // instance of process timer
    CLOCK_MONOTONIC,    // Pick a specific clock. CLOCK_MONOTONIC is
                // guaranteed to move forward, no matter what.
                // It's akin to jiffies tick count
                // CLOCK_REALTIME matches the current real-world time
    HRTIMER_MODE_REL ); // Timer mode (HRTIMER_ABS or HRTIMER_REL)

    processTimer_.function = &cyclic_task;

    processTimerNs_ =  ktime_set(1, FREQUENCY_NSEC);

    //
    // Start the timer. It will callback the .function
    // when the timer expires.
    //
    hrtimer_start(
    &processTimer_,     // instance of process timer
    processTimerNs_,    // time, nanosecconds                       
    HRTIMER_MODE_REL );     // HRTIMER_REL indicates that time should be
                // interpreted relative
                // HRTIMER_ABS indicates time is an 
                // absolute value


}

static enum hrtimer_restart
cyclic_task(struct hrtimer* timer)
{

    char msg[255];
    sprintf(msg, "%s", "Testing the buffer.");


    ctsRtNetlink_send( &msg[0], strlen(msg) );

    hrtimer_forward_now(
            &processTimer_,
            processTimerNs_ );


    return HRTIMER_RESTART; 

}

Thanks in advance for any help.

share|improve this question
2  
Nonononono. Userspace and Kernelspace are sacredly separated. One does not simply pipe information between the two. Also, you seem to ignore null terminators ('\0') in your memcpys and _sends. Always remember: strlen(str) + 1. –  cyphar Oct 4 '13 at 13:40
    
Nothing is being pushed into the kernel right now; the problem is entirely WITHIN the kernel. –  user761576 Oct 4 '13 at 14:26
    
Using GFP_ATOMIC instead of GFP_KERNEL seems to have solved the problem. Perhaps because I'm calling from a hrtimer callback, kmalloc can't be allowed to sleep? –  user761576 Oct 4 '13 at 15:41

3 Answers 3

Insufficient memory allocated

Be sure to allocate enough memory for the the string length + 1 to store it's terminator.
In sending, an length + 1 may be needed.

// ctsRtNetlink_send( &msg[0], strlen(msg) );
ctsRtNetlink_send( &msg[0], strlen(msg) + 1);  // +1 for \0
share|improve this answer
    
strlen(msg) + 1 didn't solve the problem. –  user761576 Oct 4 '13 at 14:19
    
A number of other unshown routines, like list_add_tail(), may be at fault. @joe is right about memset(). Without seeing the CoreLinkMessage structure, sample input, and other nearby routines, this problem's solution is challenging to discern. –  chux Oct 4 '13 at 14:34
    
list_add_tail() is part of the Linux kernel. I added in everything else that's running. –  user761576 Oct 4 '13 at 14:58
    
@user761576 Thanks about the list_add_tail() - thought it was your code. Maybe change "kernel" tag to "linux-kernel" as this post is specific to that kernel and not kernels in general. –  chux Oct 4 '13 at 15:05

Though your code flow is not very clear from the question, I feel the list addition may not be the problem. You must have the list handling elsewhere, where you must be removing the messages from the list etc. I suspect some sort of a deadlock situation somewhere between your list addition and removal etc. Also, check the place where you are copying the messages to the userspace and removing from the list and freeing it up. I suppose, you are not trying to directly referring your mesg from userspace as one of the commentator suggested above.

Also,

   memset( msg, 0, sizeof(CoreLinkMessage) );

if ( msg == NULL )
{

These two lines has to reverse its order else, if alloc has failed your system is doomed.

share|improve this answer
    
Ouch. That is backwards. I'll fix it. –  user761576 Oct 4 '13 at 14:43

Using GFP_ATOMIC instead of GFP_KERNEL for kmalloc solved the problem. Three days of run-time so far, and no crashing. I suspect one cannot sleep in a thread triggered by an hrtimer.

msg = (CoreLinkMessage*)kmalloc(sizeof(CoreLinkMessage), GFP_ATOMIC );

Thanks everyone for your insights!

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