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I've written a simple program that parses my banks transaction CSV file. My expression pushes results to array/hash data structure that will be saved to a database.

There are two parts:

  1. A run method that opens a file, reads each line and pushes it.
  2. A view that pulls out data from the hash.

I've included my main parse method below. It checks each line for a keyword, and if the match fails, it SHOULD push to an unclassified Hash. However, the conditional either pushes ALL or NO transactions based on whether I use elsif or else.

Matchdata objects return strings by default so else should work shouldn't it? Here's the method that builds the data structure. I've commented the portion I'm having trouble with:

def generateHashDataStructure(fileToParse, wordListToCheckAgainst)
  transactionInfo = Hash.new
  transactionInfo[:transactions] = Hash.new
  transactionInfo[:unclassifiedTransaction] = Hash.new
  transaction = transactionInfo[:transactions]
  unclassifiedTransaction = transactionInfo[:unclassifiedTransaction]

  wordListToCheckAgainst.each do |word|
    transaction[word] = Array.new
    unclassifiedTransaction[:unclassifiedTransaction] = Array.new
    File.open(fileToParse).readlines.each do |line|
       if transaction = /(?<transaction>)#{word}/.match(line)   
        date = /(?<Month>\d{1,2})\D(?<Day>\d{2})\D(?<Year>\d{4})/.match(line).to_s
        transaction = /(?<transaction>)#{word}/.match(line).to_s
        amount =/-+(?<dollars>\d+)\.(?<cents>\d+)/.match(line).to_s
        transactions[word].push({:date => date, 
                                :name => transaction, :amount =>    amount.to_f.round(2)})

        # this is problem: else/elsif don't push only if match fails
        else
         date = /(?<Month>\d{1,2})\D(?<Day>\d{2})\D(?<Year>\d{4})/.match(line).to_s
         transaction = /(?<Middle>)".*"/.match(line).to_s
         amount =/-*(?<dollars>\d+)\.(?<cents>\d+)/.match(line).to_s
         unclassifiedTransaction[:unclassifiedTransaction].push({:date => date, 
                                   :name => transaction, :amount => amount.to_f.round(2)})
         next
        end
     end
     return transactionInfo
   end

Any ideas would be great. I've researched this and I feel I've been defeated by reaching out to the community. I realize regex might not be best approach so I'm open to all feedback.

share|improve this question
1  
You should add a small sample of the input format. That looks like XML but not really? –  tadman Oct 4 '13 at 14:56
    
What do you mean by "array/hash"? That you don't know what your data structure will be? Or, do you mean that it's an "array of hashes"? If that's it, then use the proper designation as the first is nebulous and would lead to nonsense code and confusion in answers. –  the Tin Man Oct 4 '13 at 16:09
    
Your sample code won't parse. It's missing a closing end. –  the Tin Man Oct 4 '13 at 16:14
    
@tadman “That looks like XML but not really” – I think that’s just the angle brackets from using named captures (although some of them are badly formed). –  matt Oct 4 '13 at 16:20
    
Is if transaction = /(?<transaction>)#{word}/.match(line) supposed to be an assignment (=) instead of a test for equality (==)? While in Perl and C it's somewhat acceptable to assign to a variable in a conditional test, that practice is risky and bug-ridden because it leads to induced bugs during maintenance. Assign first, then test in a separate line. –  the Tin Man Oct 4 '13 at 16:21

1 Answer 1

I made your code more idiomatic, which helps reveal some very questionable things.

  1. Ruby methods and variables are written in snake_case, not CamelCase. While this seems like a matter of personal opinion, it also becomes a case of maintainability/readability. The _ helps our brains visually separate the word segments from each other in the variable name, rather than seeing a run-together string with mixed case "humps". Try_reading_a_bunch_of_text_that_is_identical exceptForThatAndSeeWhichIsMoreExhausting.
  2. You're assigning to a variable inside a conditional test:

    if transaction = /(?<transaction>)#{word}/.match(line)
    

    Don't do that. Even if it's intentional, it opens up potential for maintenance errors when someone else doesn't understand why you'd do something like that. Instead, write it in two steps so it's obvious what was intended:

    transaction = /(?<transaction>)#{word}/.match(line)  
    if transaction
    

    Or, your "assignment then compare" really should be written as:

    if transaction == /(?<transaction>)#{word}/.match(line)   
    

    Or:

    if /(?<transaction>)#{word}/.match(line)   
    

    Which is even more clean/safe/obvious.

  3. Rather than use Hash.new, and Array.new, use the direct assignments {} and [] respectively. They're less noisy and more commonly seen. Also, rather than incrementally define your hash:

    transactionInfo = Hash.new
    transactionInfo[:transactions] = Hash.new
    transactionInfo[:unclassifiedTransaction] = Hash.new
    

    Use:

    transaction_info = {
      :transactions => {},
      :unclassified_transaction => {}
    }
    

    Instantly your structure is revealed, making the intention a lot clearer.

  4. File.open(fileToParse).readlines.each do |line| is a convoluted way of doing:

    File.foreach(fileToParse) do |line|
    

    Only foreach doesn't waste memory sucking the entire file into memory all at once. There's no appreciable speed improvement to "slurping" your file, only downsides to it if the file grows to "ginormous" proportions.

  5. Instead of using:

    transactions[word].push({:date => date, 
                            :name => transaction, :amount =>    amount.to_f.round(2)})
    

    Write your code more simply. push obscures what you're doing, as does the way you formatted your lines:

    transactions[word] << {
      :date   => date,
      :name   => transaction,
      :amount => amount.to_f.round(2)
    }
    

    Note the alignment into columns. Some people eschew that particular habit, but when you're dealing with a lot of assignments it can make a big difference seeing the variations in each line.

Here's more idiomatic Ruby code:

def generate_hash_data_structure(file_to_parse, word_list_to_check_against)

  transaction_info = {
    :transactions => {},
    :unclassified_transaction => {}
  }

  transaction = transaction_info[:transactions]
  unclassified_transaction = transaction_info[:unclassified_transaction]

  word_list_to_check_against.each do |word|

    transaction[word] = []
    unclassified_transaction[:unclassified_transaction] = []

    File.foreach(file_to_parse) do |line|

      if transaction = /(?<transaction>)#{word}/.match(line)   

        date        = /(?<Month>\d{1,2})\D(?<Day>\d{2})\D(?<Year>\d{4})/.match(line).to_s
        transaction = /(?<transaction>)#{word}/.match(line).to_s
        amount      = /-+(?<dollars>\d+)\.(?<cents>\d+)/.match(line).to_s

        transactions[word] << {
          :date   => date,
          :name   => transaction,
          :amount => amount.to_f.round(2)
        }

        # this is problem: else/elsif don't push only if match fails

      else

        date        = /(?<Month>\d{1,2})\D(?<Day>\d{2})\D(?<Year>\d{4})/.match(line).to_s
        transaction = /(?<Middle>)".*"/.match(line).to_s
        amount      = /-*(?<dollars>\d+)\.(?<cents>\d+)/.match(line).to_s

        unclassified_transaction[:unclassified_transaction] << {
            :date   => date,
            :name   => transaction,
            :amount => amount.to_f.round(2)
          }

        # next
      end

    end

    transaction_info

  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for taking the time to help out. Ruby is has such an elegance but learning it is taking time. Absolutely love the shortening you did. I will be studying your changes, thanks again! –  mzak Oct 5 '13 at 15:17
    
Ruby can be elegant, but every language can be written cleanly and clearly. Elegance is writing code that is simple but powerful, while still being clean and readable. At that point it becomes Zen-like. My code partner and I like Ruby because it encourages us to write code we can read. We, me more than him, but I have a couple more decades of coding experience than he does. :-) –  the Tin Man Oct 5 '13 at 15:24

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