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It appears to me that of the 2 approaches, the first one had performace issues related to string concat and toCharArray. But I was told that both these operations occur at compile time so there is no performance overhead.

If this is true then why are compile time operations not performance overheads ?

private final static char[] DigitTens = {
     ("0000000000"+ "1111111111"+"2222222222"+"3333333333"+"4444444444" //
     +"5555555555"+"6666666666"+"7777777777"+"8888888888"+"9999999999")
      .toCharArray();             
};

VS:

private final static char[] DigitTens = {
    '0', '0', '0', '0', '0', '0', '0', '0', '0', '0',
    '1', '1', '1', '1', '1', '1', '1', '1', '1', '1',
    '2', '2', '2', '2', '2', '2', '2', '2', '2', '2',
    '3', '3', '3', '3', '3', '3', '3', '3', '3', '3',
    '4', '4', '4', '4', '4', '4', '4', '4', '4', '4',
    '5', '5', '5', '5', '5', '5', '5', '5', '5', '5',
    '6', '6', '6', '6', '6', '6', '6', '6', '6', '6',
    '7', '7', '7', '7', '7', '7', '7', '7', '7', '7',
    '8', '8', '8', '8', '8', '8', '8', '8', '8', '8',
    '9', '9', '9', '9', '9', '9', '9', '9', '9', '9',
};
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Because it depends of what kind of performance you're concerned about. Operation-wise, since it's compilation time, those costs do not add up when you execute a certain function, to put an example, in the context of a functional requirement. Now, if you were to compile classes on demand at runtime... I'd worry if and only if you had a lot of them but of course, in that case I'd be freaked out by the design and not the overhead. –  Gamb Oct 4 '13 at 16:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The string concatenation expression with the +s is a constant expression and is resolved at compile time (JLS §15.28). However, the toCharArray() call is executed at runtime. Overall, your first snippet is equivalent to this:

private final static char[] DigitTens;

static {
    DigitTens = "0000000000111111111122222222223333333333444444444455555555556666666666777777777788888888889999999999"
            .toCharArray();
}

And your second snippet is equivalent to:

private final static char[] DigitTens;

static {
    DigitTens = new char[100];
    DigitTens[0] = '0';
    DigitTens[1] = '0';
    ...
    DigitTens[99] = '9';
}

(You can see this yourself in the bytecode via javap -c)

Ultimately, don't worry about performance here; you likely won't see a difference. Pick whatever you think is clearer and easier to manage. More often than not the time it takes to compile code is irrelevant, since the compilations stage should really only happen once, after which you'll be dealing with the generated .class files that contain the bytecode.

I'll also point out that in this specific case, DigitTens[i] is simply i / 10, assuming i is in the range 0-99, inclusive.

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To answer this

If this is true then why are compile time operations not performance overheads ?

They are. But they occur only once per program creation, and never during the running of the program.

I don't think I've ever had to worry about compiler performance (beyond a looking at the overall structure of a build). I would code for clarity and not worry about the performance unless it became an issue. The same applies to runtime performance.

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I'm not sure it's true that String concatenation or toByteArray are done at compile time. I guess the compiler will collapse the concatenation of the String constants but will it convert to byte[] at compile time? –  Boris the Spider Oct 4 '13 at 16:09
2  
String concatenation is performed at compile-time, but toCharArray is not. –  Jon Skeet Oct 4 '13 at 16:13
    
I'm answering the issue of compile performance, rather than the specific issue re. concatenation presented here. Amended answer since that wasn't desperately clear –  Brian Agnew Oct 4 '13 at 16:14

A 'compile time' performance overhead affects the developer and might cost him/her a millisecond over their entire life.

A runtime performance overhead can occur x times a second, costing considerably more.

As for your specific example, the second approach is marginally more efficient (arguably at the cost of clarity), since it eliminates the need to call toCharArray at runtime.

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