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In Windows, with

 START /node 1 /affinity ff cmd /C "app.exe"

I can set the affinity of app.exe (number of cores used by app.exe).

With a windows script, How I can change the affinity of a running process ?

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of already started process? –  npocmaka Oct 4 '13 at 19:31
    
@npocmaka yes, of already started process. –  JuanPablo Oct 4 '13 at 19:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

PowerShell can do this task for you

Get Affinity:

PowerShell "Get-Process app | Select-Object ProcessorAffinity"

Set Affinity:

PowerShell "$Process = Get-Process app; $Process.ProcessorAffinity=255"

Example: (8 Core Processor)

  • Core # = Value = BitMask
  • Core 1 = 1 = 00000001
  • Core 2 = 2 = 00000010
  • Core 3 = 4 = 00000100
  • Core 4 = 8 = 00001000
  • Core 5 = 16 = 00010000
  • Core 6 = 32 = 00100000
  • Core 7 = 64 = 01000000
  • Core 8 = 128 = 10000000

Just add the decimal values together for which core you want to use. 255 = All 8 cores.

  • All Cores = 255 = 11111111

Example Output:

C:\>PowerShell "Get-Process notepad++ | Select-Object ProcessorAffinity"

                                                              ProcessorAffinity
                                                              -----------------
                                                                            255



C:\>PowerShell "$Process = Get-Process notepad++; $Process.ProcessorAffinity=13"

C:\>PowerShell "Get-Process notepad++ | Select-Object ProcessorAffinity"

                                                              ProcessorAffinity
                                                              -----------------
                                                                             13



C:\>PowerShell "$Process = Get-Process notepad++; $Process.ProcessorAffinity=255"

C:\>

Source:

Here is a nicely detailed post on how to change a process's affinity: http://www.energizedtech.com/2010/07/powershell-setting-processor-a.html

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the first command works fine. but for the 2nd I get this message: "The property 'ProcessorAffinity' cannot be found on this object. Verify that the property exists and can be set. At line:1 char:32 + $Process = Get-Process chrome; $Process.ProcessorAffinity=1 + ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + CategoryInfo : InvalidOperation: (:) [], RuntimeException + FullyQualifiedErrorId : PropertyAssignmentException " –  user3752281 Feb 24 at 9:46
    
How can this be used if there are multiple processes with the same name (e.g., java)? Does it set the affinity of all the java processes, or pick one at random (or lowest pid, etc.) –  Daniel Widdis Mar 9 at 16:39
    
@DanielWiddis Using Get-Process java | ... will change the affinity for all of the java processes. If you just want a specific instance of java, you will have to know and use the process ID. e.g. Get-Process -ID 8500 Otherwise, you will have to implement your own filtering. –  David Ruhmann Mar 9 at 18:01
wmic process where name="some.exe" call setpriority ProcessIDLevel

I think these are the priority levels .You can also use PID instead of process name.

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1  
with affinity, I can set the specific number of processors or cores to use. with priority, I only can set a level of priority? –  JuanPablo Oct 4 '13 at 20:08
    
You want to disable/enable process on certain processor? I don't think there's a wmi class that provides such capability , but I'll check.Other option is to compile your own tool with .net tools that comes with windows. –  npocmaka Oct 4 '13 at 20:20
    
yes, disable/enable process on certain processor. –  JuanPablo Oct 4 '13 at 20:30
    
not possible with batch commands.Even jscript/vbscript won't help here.I think it's possible with .net (that could be embedded into batch file) , but don't know how long time it will take me. –  npocmaka Oct 4 '13 at 20:41

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