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I have a small performance bottleneck in an application that requires removing the non-diagonal elements from a large square matrix. So, the matrix x

17    24     1     8    15
23     5     7    14    16
 4     6    13    20    22
10    12    19    21     3
11    18    25     2     9

becomes

17     0     0     0     0
 0     5     0     0     0
 0     0    13     0     0
 0     0     0    21     0
 0     0     0     0     9

Question: The bsxfun and diag solution below is the fastest solution so far, and I doubt I can improve it while still keeping the code in Matlab, but is there a faster way?

Solutions

Here is what I thought of so far.

Perform element-wise multiplication by the identity matrix. This is the simplest solution:

y = x .* eye(n);

Using bsxfun and diag:

y = bsxfun(@times, diag(x), eye(n));

Lower/upper triangular matrices:

y = x - tril(x, -1) - triu(x, 1);

Various solutions using loops:

y = x;
for ix=1:n
    for jx=1:n
        if ix ~= jx
            y(ix, jx) = 0;
        end
    end
end

and

y = x;
for ix=1:n
    for jx=1:ix-1
        y(ix, jx) = 0;
    end
    for jx=ix+1:n
        y(ix, jx) = 0;
    end
end

Timing

The bsxfun solution is actually the fastest. This is my timing code:

function timing()
clear all

n = 5000;
x = rand(n, n);

f1 = @() tf1(x, n);
f2 = @() tf2(x, n);
f3 = @() tf3(x);
f4 = @() tf4(x, n);
f5 = @() tf5(x, n);

t1 = timeit(f1);
t2 = timeit(f2);
t3 = timeit(f3);
t4 = timeit(f4);
t5 = timeit(f5);

fprintf('t1: %f s\n', t1)
fprintf('t2: %f s\n', t2)
fprintf('t3: %f s\n', t3)
fprintf('t4: %f s\n', t4)
fprintf('t5: %f s\n', t5)
end

function y = tf1(x, n)
y = x .* eye(n);
end


function y = tf2(x, n)
y = bsxfun(@times, diag(x), eye(n));
end


function y = tf3(x)
y = x - tril(x, -1) - triu(x, 1);
end


function y = tf4(x, n)
y = x;
for ix=1:n
    for jx=1:n
        if ix ~= jx
            y(ix, jx) = 0;
        end
    end
end
end


function y = tf5(x, n)
y = x;
for ix=1:n
    for jx=1:ix-1
        y(ix, jx) = 0;
    end
    for jx=ix+1:n
        y(ix, jx) = 0;
    end
end
end

which returns

t1: 0.111117 s
t2: 0.078692 s
t3: 0.219582 s
t4: 1.183389 s
t5: 1.198795 s
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I found that:

diag(diag(x))

is faster than bsxfun. Similarly:

diag(x(1:size(x,1)+1:end))

is faster by more or less the same amount. playing with timeit for x=rand(5000) I got both faster than your bsxfun by a factor of ~20.

EDIT:

This is on par with diag(diag(...:

x2(n,n)=0;
x2(1:n+1:end)=x(1:n+1:end);

Note that the way I preallocate x2 is important, if you just use x2=zeros(n) you'll get a slower solution. Read more about this in this discussion...

share|improve this answer

I didn't bother testing your various loop functions, since they were much slower in your implementation, but I tested the others, plus another method that I've used before:

y = diag(diag(x));

Here's the spoiler:

c1: 193.18 milliseconds  // multiply by identity
c2: 102.16 milliseconds  // bsxfun
c3: 342.24 milliseconds  // tril and triu
c4:   6.03 milliseconds  // call diag twice

It looks like two calls to diag is by far the fastest on my machine.

Full timing code follows. I used my own benchmarking function rather than timeit but the results should be comparable (and you can check them yourself).

>> x = randn(5000);

>> c1 = @() x .* eye(5000);
>> c2 = @() bsxfun(@times, diag(x), eye(5000));
>> c3 = @() x - tril(x,-1) - triu(x,1);
>> c4 = @() diag(diag(x));


>> benchmark.bench(c1)

Benchmarking @()x.*eye(5000)
   Mean: 193.18 milliseconds, lb 191.94 milliseconds, ub 194.25 milliseconds, ci 95%
  Stdev: 6.01 milliseconds, lb 3.27 milliseconds, ub 8.58 milliseconds, ci 95%

>> benchmark.bench(c2)

Benchmarking @()bsxfun(@times,diag(x),eye(5000))
   Mean: 102.16 milliseconds, lb 100.83 milliseconds, ub 103.44 milliseconds, ci 95%
  Stdev: 6.61 milliseconds, lb 6.04 milliseconds, ub 7.07 milliseconds, ci 95%

>> benchmark.bench(c3)

Benchmarking @()x-tril(x,-1)-triu(x,1)
   Mean: 342.24 milliseconds, lb 340.28 milliseconds, ub 344.20 milliseconds, ci 95%
  Stdev: 10.06 milliseconds, lb 8.85 milliseconds, ub 11.17 milliseconds, ci 95%

>> benchmark.bench(c4)

Benchmarking @()diag(diag(x))
   Mean: 6.03 milliseconds, lb 5.96 milliseconds, ub 6.09 milliseconds, ci 95%
  Stdev: 0.34 milliseconds, lb 0.27 milliseconds, ub 0.40 milliseconds, ci 95%
share|improve this answer
    
It's faster than bsxfun by a factor of 22 on my machine, which is fantastic. Guess I should have read the docs on diag more closely, since they mention that giving diag a vector makes a square matrix. I wonder why bsxfun is so much slower relative to the other methods on your machine? –  Michael A Oct 4 '13 at 18:02
    
@natan It's about the same. This is a good example of why tic and toc aren't really good ways to benchmark. timeit is built-in for recent versions, and available from the file exchange for older versions. –  Michael A Oct 4 '13 at 18:17
    
@natan Not directly, no, but it's easy enough to wrap an anonymous function around a multiline function, as I did in the original question. –  Michael A Oct 4 '13 at 18:40

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