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I successfully have a cron job running with this command:

cd "public_html/wp-content/uploads/bpfb/" && mogrify -strip -resize 800x800\> *.jpeg *.jpg

This basically takes all JPEG images and resizes them in a particular folder via ImageMagick. However, the problem is that this command will keep processing "already processed" images over and over based on the cron interval. I need to keep all files in this same directory, so I am looking for a way that cron (or PHP script) can detect if it has already been processed and exclude those files on the next cron cycle.

(Please note that I'm not too savvy with cron or PHP scripts, so basics steps for me is much appreciated).

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closed as off-topic by afuzzyllama, Esoteric Screen Name, Cfreak, Igor Jerosimić, RGraham Oct 5 '13 at 7:20

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – afuzzyllama, Esoteric Screen Name, Cfreak, Igor Jerosimić, RGraham
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
cron is just a task scheduler. it never has, and never will, run complicated logic for you. that's NOT its job. it just runs specified commands at particular times. If you want to filter files, then write a script to do that. – Marc B Oct 4 '13 at 18:29
1  
You could process them and move them to a "done" folder in your cron job - wrap that up in a batch file, or a PHP file if you prefer. – halfer Oct 4 '13 at 18:30
    
Thanks for the responses... I guess I need a php script, but I do need these files to stay in this same directory with the same name – Michael Ryden Oct 4 '13 at 18:35
up vote 0 down vote accepted

A secondary approach would be to log processed filename to a log file and compare against directory listing to see if it has been processed.

untested again:

<?php

   // Open log file so we can read and put processed image name onto array
   $imageLogFilename = 'image.log';
   $fh = fopen($imageLogFilename,'a+');

   $processedFileNames = array();
   $newProcessedFileNames = array();

   // Read file line by line and add filename onto an array
   if($fh)
   {
     while (($line = fgets($fh)) !== false) 
     {
       $processedFileNames[] = trim($line);
     }

     fclose($fh);   

   }
   else
   {
      die('error - could not open log for reading');
   }




   $imageDirectory = "/home/public_html/images/"; // Path to your images 

   // Read all files in image directory. (You could put this in a function and call recursively if you have child directories.)
   $files = scandir($imageDirectory);

   foreach($files as $file)
   {
     if($file == '.' || $file == '..') 
     {
       continue;
     }

     // check if this image is in the already processed image array
     if(in_array($file, $processedFileNames) === false)
     {
        // your resize code here

        if($resizeResult == false)
        {
          die('Image Resizing Failed');
        }             

     }

     // Store all images on new array
     $newProcessedFileNames[] = $file;  

   }


   if(count($newProcessedFileNames) > 0)
   {

     // open logfile again but this time truncate and update with latest image filenames, so its up to date for next run.
     $fh = fopen($imageLogFilename,'w');

     if($fh)
     {
        foreach($newProcessedFileNames as $filename)
        {
          fwrite($fh,$filename . PHP_EOL);
        }

        fclose($fh);
     }
     else
     {
       die('error - could not write to log file');
     }
   }

   fclose($fh);       

?>
share|improve this answer
1  
Once again, thank you. I just thought of something... Do you think this idea can work to save on system resources for large quantities: Since each file has a creation date, maybe the PHP script can look at the current day and process only current day images; and ignore all other dates.... However, I do like the 'log processed' solution too – Michael Ryden Oct 4 '13 at 23:10
    
Yes you could do that, you just have to think about which way will give you the best outcome. My thinking is checking the actual image dimensions has the least potential for any problems with files getting missed, but is the slowest. The log file way is quicker than reading each image but has a slight chance that if the log corrupts somehow then you will have to check the image dimensions to fix the log. The creation date can work if you can trust the date will never change. Just remember to call clearstatcache(); if you check the creation time. Or do a mix of log and created time. – Springie Oct 5 '13 at 8:50

The best solution is to rename or move to another directory.

As you say you can't do that, then you could create a PHP script that uses getimagesize() or similar to get the image dimensions, if the image width and height = 800, then you can assume its been processed.

This isn't the most efficient solution though.

Untested example:

<?php

  $imageDirectory = "/home/public_html/images/"; // Path to your images 

  // Read all files in directory. (You could put this in a function and call recursively if you have child directories.)
  $files = scandir($imageDirectory);

  foreach($files as $file)
  {
    if($file == '.' || $file == '..') 
    {
       continue;
    }

    if(preg_match('/\.(jpg|jpeg)$/', $file))
    {
        list($width, $height, $type, $attr) = getimagesize($imageDirectory . $file);

        // This is your image resize condition, change to suit your requirements
        if($width > 800 && $height > 800)
        {
           // Resize Image Code Here  
        }
    }

  }

?>

You may want to get the actual mime type of the image rather than an extension match if you can't trust the images source.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you SO much for taking the time to give me a great head start with this code. I will attempt to put this together. Can I have it just process images GREATER than 800x800? (so I can leave any smaller files untouched) What else would I need to add? Regardless, I'm gonna try my best with this. – Michael Ryden Oct 4 '13 at 19:55
    
I have updated the code so it will update images bigger than 800 x 800. If you want to make it so the image will be resized if the height OR the width are greater than 800 then simply change the line to if($width > 800 || $height > 800) – Springie Oct 4 '13 at 20:17
    
How many images are there/will there be? If you are checking hundreds of images, you will probably need to increase the maximum execution time. It also maybe worthwhile to log when you start and end the script either by file or email, so you can tell if you are having any timeout issues etc. The other way you could do this is store processed image names to a log file, and then compare the log with the directory listing. – Springie Oct 4 '13 at 20:46
    
Springie - you are awesome for all of this help... I will be having hundreds of images...maybe into the thousands eventually as users upload to this directory. Will this be okay? Oh so even though it will skip certain files that are under 800x800, it still needs to check each file? I guess that makes sense. ...uggh, I wish I was better at coding. I'm getting a syntax error on line 6, but maybe it's something I'm doing wrong. (if I can't figure this out, I will just have to live with files being recompressed over and over... but I will try my best to solve this) – Michael Ryden Oct 4 '13 at 21:04
    
Sorry, missing semi colon, fixed now. See how it goes, but checking the dimensions of each n of 1000 images could be slow, so look up how to increase the execution time (set_time_limit()) and you could add a usleep() in every 100 or so to give the server a quick break for other processes. You DO NOT want to resize every image each time as this is the worse case for performance. – Springie Oct 4 '13 at 21:19

I recommend that call a script in a language of your choice with cron.

Then you can add the logic in there to prevent it from processing the images again. You could either put the finished ones in a different folder, mark them differently with a prefix or suffix or you could keep a log somewhere.

mogrify has a parameter -path where you can write it into another directory by the way.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks Patrick, but unfortunately I'm restricted to keeping the same file name and directory and only shrink all files located there. (this is due to a plugin that allows users to upload their own images to this particular area (the author of this plug-in allowed any image size to be uploaded. This would ultimately have my server & bandwidth exhausted... so I'm trying to figure out a work-around. – Michael Ryden Oct 4 '13 at 20:04

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