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Why doesn't jordan have the properties of the Human class? Shouldn't saying Coder.prototype = new Human; be enough for all Coder classes to inherit all properties of the Human class?

Does it have something to do with defining functions as assignments?

var Human = function() {
     var hi = function() {
         alert('hi');
      };
     return {
        name : 'dan',
       sayHi : hi
     };
};

var dan = new Human();

var Coder = function() {
   var code = function() {
      alert('1010101');
   };    
  return {
    code : code
  };
};

Coder.prototype = new Human;
Coder.prototype.constructor = new Coder;
var jordan = new Coder();
console.log(jordan);
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1  
Is there a reason your trying to hide the vars code and hi? –  Kevin Bowersox Oct 4 '13 at 19:24
1  
Just need to say that inheritance in JavaScript works well. Your code isn't working. –  pkuderov Oct 4 '13 at 19:25
    
@pkuderov great contribution. –  user2727253 Oct 4 '13 at 20:44
    
@KevinBowersox, not a real example just trying to understand how it actually inherits. I'd like to be able to private scope vars, but I can do that by not attaching them to this i guess. –  user2727253 Oct 4 '13 at 20:45
    
For more info on prototype, inheritance, overriding and calling super you can have a look at this stackoverflow.com/a/16063711/1641941 You don't have create a new instance of the parent to inherit and in the child's body it's better to call something like Parent.call(this,arguments); to make the parent's instance variables part of the to be constructed child. –  HMR Oct 5 '13 at 2:28
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's a funny thing: a JS constructor can return an object that becomes this. This object however doesn't follow the prototypes, as defined for the constructor (in this case it's a plain Object). The correct way that looks like your code would be:

var Human = function() {
    var hi = function() {
        alert('hi');
    };
    this.name = "dan";
    this.sayHi = hi;
};

// or even:
var Human = function() {
    this.name = "dan";
};

Human.prototype.sayHi = function() {
    alert('hi');
};

Similar for Coder. The inheritance code is OK.

share|improve this answer
    
ahhhh, i knew it had to do with that, but why is it that I can't have a function redefine it's this. I was hoping to follow my typical alias returning of a function but still be able to prototype. Is there a workaround? can I explicitly define the constructor? –  user2727253 Oct 4 '13 at 19:53
    
No, I don't think there is :) –  Nikos Paraskevopoulos Oct 4 '13 at 19:59
1  
The inheritance code is almost okay: the part that adjusts the constructor should be Coder.prototype.constructor = Coder; –  bfavaretto Oct 5 '13 at 2:56
    
@bfavaretto Yes, very correct, I missed that! –  Nikos Paraskevopoulos Oct 5 '13 at 8:48
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Your constructors do not return the objects they're creating, so inheritance won't work. Use this instead:

var Human = function() {
     this.sayHi = function() {
         alert('hi');
     };
     this.name = 'dan';
};

var dan = new Human();

var Coder = function() {
   this.code = function() {
      alert('1010101');
   };    
};

Coder.prototype = new Human;
Coder.prototype.constructor = Coder;
var jordan = new Coder();
console.log(jordan);

Another option, moving the stuff from Human to the prototype:

var Human = function() {};
Human.prototype.sayHi = function() {
    alert('hi');
};
Human.prototype.name = 'dan'; // will be shadowed if redefined on instances

var Coder = function() {};
Coder.prototype = Object.create(Human.prototype);
Coder.prototype.code = function() {
    alert('1010101');
};  
var jordan = new Coder();
console.log(jordan);

A polyfill for Object.create is available on MDN

share|improve this answer
    
i was hoping to use my standard aliasing at the end of a function. is there no work around? adding the function to the prototype is def better and more efficient way! –  user2727253 Oct 4 '13 at 20:44
    
There's no way use prototypes and return a completely new object at the same time. Maybe you could just use Object.create directly? Something like: var extendedObj = Object.create(baseObj), without using constructors (you could wrap that in a function, of course, but wouldn't be calling it with new). –  bfavaretto Oct 4 '13 at 20:56
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