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I have some simple code with a for loop. In each pass of the loop I must increment the JProgressBar; however, this isn't working. See below:

public void atualizarBarraDeProgresso(final int valorGeral, final int valorAtual) {
    Thread threadProgressoCarregamento = new Thread() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
             jProgressBarPersistindo.setValue(valorAtual);
        }
    };
    threadProgressoCarregamento.start();
}

I'm calling the method "atualizarBarraDeProgresso" in a loop like below:

progressBar.setMinimum(0);
progressBar.setMaximum(qtd);
for(int i = 0; i < qtd; i++) { 
    atualizarBarraDeProgresso(qtd, i + 1);
    doSomething();
}

But nothing happens with my progressBar.

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6  
Do you really want that many threads? In any case, I suspect the problem is that the loop itself happens on the ADT (i.e. in a "click handler") and blocks Swing UI interaction and updates until it completes. Consider using a SwingWorker - using such correctly will likely eliminate all problems. Also, make sure to only update Swing objects on the ADT. –  user2246674 Oct 4 '13 at 19:32
    
Are you calling repaint() on the containing JPanel after you set the value at any point? This may be all that's missing. –  Barryrowe Oct 4 '13 at 19:33
    
call the repaint() method, and by the way, the solution is very bad. –  user2511414 Oct 4 '13 at 19:40
1  
@user2246674 (polite cough) By 'ADT' DYM 'EDT'? For the OP, a general tip. Don't block the EDT (Event Dispatch Thread) - the GUI will 'freeze' when that happens. Instead of calling Thread.sleep(n) implement a Swing Timer for repeating tasks or a SwingWorker for long running tasks. See Concurrency in Swing for more details. –  Andrew Thompson Oct 4 '13 at 19:51
1  
This is a funny inversion of the required logic: instead of ensuring that the modification of the Swing Component happens inside the EDT this code ensures that the modification is the only action not in the EDT. –  Holger Oct 8 '13 at 11:13

2 Answers 2

try adding a thread before a for statment. I hope it works

    progressBar.setMinimum(0);
    progressBar.setMaximum(qtd);

    new Thread(){
        @Override
        public void run() {
            for(int i = 0; i < qtd; i++) { 
                atualizarBarraDeProgresso(qtd, i + 1);
                doSomething();
            }
        }
    }.start();
share|improve this answer

This should be easily managed with a SwingWorker implementation. SwingWorkers are useful when you need to "do something" but don't want to block the GUI while doing it. The class also gives you a useful API for communicating back to the EDT when you need to update a GUI component while doing other work via the publish()/process() methods.

The below implementation handles your loop on a worker thread so that it does not block the EDT (the GUI thread). Calls to publish(Integer...) are relayed to the EDT as a call to process(List) which is where you want to update your JProgressBar, because like all Swing components you should only update a JProgressBar on the EDT.

public class MySwingWorker extends SwingWorker<Void, Integer> {

    private final int qtd;
    private final JProgressBar progressBar;

    public MySwingWorker(JProgressBar progressBar, int qtd){
        this.qtd = qtd;
        this.progressBar = progressBar;
    }

    /* This method is called off the EDT so it doesn't block the GUI. */
    @Override
    protected Void doInBackground() throws Exception {
        for(int i = 0; i < qtd; i++) { 

            /* This sends the arguments to the process(List) method 
             * so they can be handled on the EDT. */
            publish(i + 1);

            /* Do your stuff. */
            doSomething();
        }
        return null;
    }

    /* This method is called on the EDT in response to a 
     * call to publish(Integer...) */
    @Override
    protected void process(List<Integer> chunks) {
        progressBar.setValue(chunks.get(chunks.size() - 1));
    }
}

You can start it like this

int qtd = ...;

progressBar.setMinimum(0);
progressBar.setMaximum(qtd);

SwingWorker<? ,?> worker = new MySwingWorker(progressBar, qtd);

worker.execute();
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