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I have written a program to solve Diophantine equations in the form

A5 + B5 + C5 + D5 + E5 = 0;

It should run in N3long(N) time, but it usually takes about 10 minutes for an input size of 100. Can anyone tell me whats wrong?

public class EquationSolver {

//Solves Equations of type: A^5 + B^5 + C^5 + D^5 + E^5 = F^5

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.println("Enter a max value: ");
    int N = input.nextInt();
    long START_TIME = System.nanoTime();
    SLinkedList test = new SLinkedList();
    SLinkedList test2 = new SLinkedList();
    test = setupLeftList(N);
    test2 = setupRightList(N);
    System.out.println("Note: This program takes about 7 minutes to complete for input of 100");
    test = mergeSort(test);
    test2 = mergeSort(test2);
    long END_TIME2 = System.nanoTime() - START_TIME;
    System.out.println("Total Time:" + END_TIME2/1000000000.0);
    checkEquality(test, test2);
    long END_TIME3 = System.nanoTime() - START_TIME;
    System.out.println("Total Time:" + END_TIME3/1000000000.0);

}


public static SLinkedList setupLeftList(long boundary)
{
    //Creates and returns an linkedList of all possible A,B,C values and their sums
    SLinkedList leftSums = new SLinkedList();
    for(long c = 0; c < boundary; c++)
    {
        for(long b = 0; b < c; b++)
        {
            for(long a = 0; a < b; a++)
            {
                    long sum = (long)(Math.pow(a+1,5)) + (long)(Math.pow(b+1, 5)) + (int)(Math.pow(c+1, 5));
                    Node current = new Node (sum, a+1, b+1, c+1, null);
                    //System.out.println(sum);
                    leftSums.addLast(current);
            }
        }
    }
    return leftSums;
}
public static SLinkedList setupRightList(long boundary)
{
    //Creates and returns an linkedList of all possible D,E,F values and their sums
    SLinkedList rightSums = new SLinkedList();
    for(int f = 0; f < boundary; f++)
    {
        for(int e = 0; e < f; e++)
        {
            for(int d = 0; d < e; d++)
            {   
                long sum = (long)(Math.pow(f+1, 5)) - ((long)(Math.pow(d+1, 5)) + (long)(Math.pow(e+1,5)));

                    Node current = new Node (sum, d+1, e+1, f+1, null);
                    //System.out.println(current.getSum());
                    rightSums.addLast(current); 

            }
        }
    }
    return rightSums;
}

public static SLinkedList mergeSort(SLinkedList sums)
// Sorts each list by the value of the sum
{

    if (sums.length() > 1 )
    {

    SLinkedList[] splitList = split(sums);
    SLinkedList s1 = mergeSort(splitList[0]);
    SLinkedList s2 = mergeSort(splitList[1]);
    sums = merge(s1, s2);

    }
    return sums;
}

public static SLinkedList[] split(SLinkedList sums)
{
    // Splits a linked list into two (somewhat) equal halves
    long midpoint = sums.length()/2;

    Node midPoint = sums.elementAt(midpoint); 

    SLinkedList s1 = new SLinkedList(sums.head, midPoint, midpoint);
    SLinkedList s2 = new SLinkedList(midPoint, sums.tail, midpoint);
    SLinkedList[] both = new SLinkedList[]{s1, s2};
    return both;
}

public static SLinkedList merge(SLinkedList s1, SLinkedList s2)
{
    // Merges two sorted lists of elements
    SLinkedList sMerged = new SLinkedList();
    while(!s1.isEmpty() && !s2.isEmpty())
    {
        if (s1.getFirst().getSum() < s2.getFirst().getSum())
        {
            sMerged.addLast(s1.removeFirst());
        }
        else
        {
            sMerged.addLast(s2.removeFirst());
        }
    }
    while(!s1.isEmpty())
    {
        sMerged.addLast(s1.removeFirst());
    }
    while(!s2.isEmpty())
    {
        sMerged.addLast(s2.removeFirst());
    }
    return sMerged;
}

public static void checkEquality(SLinkedList left, SLinkedList right)
{
    // Checks two linked lists for nodes that contain the same Sum value
    boolean ans = false;
    while (left.isEmpty() == false && right.isEmpty() == false)
    {
        long currentLeft = left.getFirst().getSum();
        long currentRight = right.getFirst().getSum();
        if (currentLeft > currentRight)
        {
            right.removeFirst();
        }
        else if(currentLeft < currentRight)
        {
            left.removeFirst();
        }
        else
        {
            if (left.getFirst().getC() <= right.getFirst().getA())
            {
                System.out.println("Answer Found: " + "A: " + left.getFirst().getA() + " B: " + left.getFirst().getB() + " C: " 
                    + left.getFirst().getC() + " D: " + right.getFirst().getA() + " E: " + right.getFirst().getB() + " F: " + right.getFirst().getC());
                ans = true;
            }

            Node temp = left.getFirst().getNext();

            while (temp.getSum() == currentRight)
            {
                if (temp.getC() <= right.getFirst().getA())
                {
                    System.out.println("Answer Found: " + "A: " + left.getFirst().getA() + " B: " + left.getFirst().getB() + " C: " 
                        + left.getFirst().getC() + " D: " + right.getFirst().getA() + " E: " + right.getFirst().getB() + " F: " + right.getFirst().getC());
                    ans = true;

                }
                temp = temp.getNext();

            }

            right.removeFirst();
            left.removeFirst();

        }
    }
    if (ans == false)
    {
        System.out.println("No answer found.");
    }

}

}

share|improve this question
2  
You might want to benchmark your runtime for different input size to verify that your algorithm is indeed O N^3 log N. –  edTarik Oct 4 '13 at 20:12

1 Answer 1

The definitive answer is: use a profiler and see what causes a bottleneck...

But I see you have Math.pow() calls, all with longs, and their 5th power.

You could do it quicker, while even detecting the overflow:

public static long pow5(long base) {
  if(base <=6208 && base >=-6208) {
    return base*base*base*base*base;
  } else {
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("Overflow!");
  }
}

(Magic number disclaimer: 62085 is ~263, is a number is bigger than that, the 5th power won't fit into 64 bits...)

Math.pow uses doubles, which means a lot of conversion in itself...

Also, @Floris pointed out that it is not even worth computing this over and over again - it could be put into a nice array, and just index that

public static long[] pow5 = getPow5(100);

public static long[] getPow5(long numElements) {
    long[] toReturn = new long[numElements];

    for(long i=0;long<numElements;long++) {
        toReturn[i] = i*i*i*i*i;
    }
    return toReturn;
}

And where needed, instead of Math.pow(x, 5) just use pow5[x]

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Ill try this. Also, Ive timed each part, and merge sort is taking the longest which is backwards from what it should be... –  user2840438 Oct 4 '13 at 20:22
    
The merge sort calls split which does all kinds of memory allocation with all the new SlinkedList calls. Probably quite an inefficient implementation. Also - I believe you only ever compute the 5th power of numbers between 0 and 100 - compute it once and look it up might be faster (depends on whether the lookup table stays in cache - it's less than 1kB in size...). –  Floris Oct 4 '13 at 21:14
1  
@Floris thanks, I didn't even delve deep into the implementation of the linkedlist - and the lookup idea is really a good one. I think on any reasonable CPU it should stay near the ALUs... –  ppeterka Oct 4 '13 at 21:18
    
Does your getPow5 code actually work? I'm a C guy, but I would have thought that toReturn is allocated on the stack, and not valid after the function returns. Better create the static at the main level, and pass the pointer in. Although I have been known to create the static array at the function level to get around this (don't tell the syntax police or they will hunt me down). –  Floris Oct 4 '13 at 22:17
    
@Floris Yes, Java is quite a bit different from C - for one pointers as such don't exist, just object references. It would be possible to rewrite it so that the method would accept a long[] argument, which it would fill until its full using the length. –  ppeterka Oct 4 '13 at 22:28

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