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I get an illegalArgument Exception when I call the setJulianDate method in the joda time API for certain julian double values.

JDateTime jdt = new JDateTime(); 
JulianDateStamp jdstamp = new JulianDateStamp(julianDateDouble);
jdt.setJulianDate(jdstamp);
System.out.println(jdt);

When

Double julianDateDouble = (double)2452555.13;

I get the java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Value too big: 1000 error. However, when

Double julianDateDouble = (double)2452558.67;

The double julian value gets converted to 2002-10-11 04:04:48.000 correctly. The same happens for a bunch of julian date values I have.

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I believe this has to do with how the number 2452555.13 and others are represented in memory. The millisecond value for the format seems to reach 1000 which can't be displayed correctly and therefore throws the IllegalArgumentException. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Oct 4 '13 at 21:01
    
@SotiriosDelimanolis do you know a way to solve this? I need the accuracy of the conversion only to an hour. –  picmate Oct 4 '13 at 21:26
    
Not familiar with the API but I noticed one thing about your code. There's no need to explicitly cast these values like this. Floating point numbers in Java are double by default. (double)2452555.13 is exactly the same as 2452555.13. It's also possible to append the number with the letter d if you want to avoid confusion 2452555.13d. –  Tom Oct 4 '13 at 21:32
    
I explicitly cast the numbers because the values comes out of an external array of numbers that have no decimals at times; they are implicitly regarded as integers. –  picmate Oct 4 '13 at 21:40
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm not sure, but everything seems to point to the precision of a floating point number. You can use the overloaded constructor for JulianDateStamp that accepts a BigDecimal.

BigDecimal julianDateDouble = new BigDecimal("2452555.13");
JDateTime jdt = new JDateTime(); 
JulianDateStamp jdstamp = new JulianDateStamp(julianDateDouble);
jdt.setJulianDate(jdstamp);
System.out.println(jdt);

prints

2002-10-07 15:07:12.000

which is validated by this Julian Date Converter.

If your input is coming in the form of a double, use

Double dob = (double)2452555.13;
System.out.println(dob);
BigDecimal julianDateDouble = new BigDecimal(dob.toString());
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Thank you very much for the answer. Now the values get converted correctly. –  picmate Oct 4 '13 at 22:08
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