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Is there any way to explain how Objects are created and live on the Heap ? and how to calculate how many Objects are there on the heap at Runtime ?

For more clarification ... I have an answer to the first question now, but i need to know a way to calculate the live objects in heap at run time ... Weather a tool or a pattern or an algorithm ... How can i know the count of live objects on the heap at runtime

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Hot Licks, rgettman, Tom, Dirk, Shankar Damodaran Oct 5 '13 at 8:52

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
i have an answer to the first question, but i need an answer to the second one –  EL-conte De-monte TereBentikh Oct 4 '13 at 20:36
    
Uh... did you just create a question specifically to answer yourself? –  sircodesalot Oct 4 '13 at 20:38
    
i have a partial answer, the second question i dont have it's answer –  EL-conte De-monte TereBentikh Oct 4 '13 at 20:43
    
what do you mean by "calculate"? –  Kevin Oct 4 '13 at 20:44
    
@Kevin know how many Objects are there on the heap at Runtime –  EL-conte De-monte TereBentikh Oct 4 '13 at 20:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As an initial statement about this extensive subject can be:

  1. Java objects reside the heap. The heap is created when the JVM starts up and may increase or decrease in size while the application runs
  2. When the heap becomes full, garbage is collected. During the garbage collection objects that are no longer used are cleared, thus making space for new objects.
  3. JVM uses more memory than just the heap. For example Java methods, thread stacks and native handles are allocated in memory separate from the heap, as well as JVM internal data structures.
  4. The heap is sometimes divided into two areas (or generations) called the nursery (or young space) and the old space. The nursery is a part of the heap reserved for allocation of new objects. When the nursery becomes full, garbage is collected by running a special young collection, where all objects that have lived long enough in the nursery are promoted (moved) to the old space, thus freeing up the nursery for more object allocation. When the old space becomes full garbage is collected there, a process called an old collection.

source:http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E13150_01/jrockit_jvm/jrockit/geninfo/diagnos/garbage_collect.html

Regarding your second question

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pretty informative, thanks ... but dont you have an answer to my second question, how can you calculate the objects on the heap ? –  EL-conte De-monte TereBentikh Oct 4 '13 at 20:45
    
Sorry but I cannot understand the term "calculate". Can you please specify it? –  istovatis Oct 4 '13 at 20:47
    
i explained my question more, i mean how many Objects are currently living on the heap (at runtime) –  EL-conte De-monte TereBentikh Oct 4 '13 at 20:49
    
Hint: Constructors do not allocate the objects they represent. –  Hot Licks Oct 4 '13 at 21:57

From my studies for the OCP Java 6 Programmer, credit goes to Kathy Sierra and Bert Bates, and the Study Guide "SCJP 6"

Inheritence, Stack & Heap section (in Chapter 2) :

CONSTRUCTOR :

            1-  IT MUST NOT HAVE A RETURN
            2-  IT MUST MATCH THE CLASS NAME EXACTLY
            3-  THE DEFAULT CONSTRUCTOR HAS THE SAME ACCESS MODIFIER AS THE CLASS 

constructor life chain :

        1-  when calling a constructor throw the "new" keyword, the constructor calls
            (invokes) all the super classes constructors throw the IMPLICIT "super()" till
            the Object class (it's at the top of the inheritence hirarchy of any class in
            Java), unless you have an overloaded constructor in one of the superclasses,
            containing arguements, which should be called from it's sub with the 
            super(arg1, arg2, ...) alike the constructor

        2-  the first constructor up the inheritence tree starts to run in the JVM, 
            at this point you are at the top of the STACK...
            initializing all it's initial variables by giving them there explicit values
            (initialized previosly by the classes creator), then the next constructor,
            till the one calles

        3-  the constructors are all called, given there explicit values (if mentioned in
            there constructors called), then every object finishes it's job, it's caller 
            is removed from the stack, untill all objects created, given values, and
            reachable throw the "main()" stack frame, so all destroyed except the method
            running now which is the "main()" in this case

EXAMPLE FOR CONSTRUCTOR CHAINS IN MEMORY :

suppose we have this Inheritence tree :

public class Object {/*implicitly inherited by any class in Java*/}

public class Zoo {
    private static int animalsInTheZoo;

    public Zoo(){
        super();                                //implicit by the compiler
        getInstancesCreated();
        System.out.println("animals in the zoo now : " + animalsInTheZoo);}

    private int getInstancesCreated(){
        return ++animalsInTheZoo;}

    public int getAnimalsInTheZoo(){
        return this.animalsInTheZoo;}
}      

public class AddAnimal extends Zoo{

    private String animalName;

    public AddAnimal(String name){
        super();                                //implicit by the compiler
        this.animalName = name;
        System.out.println("the new Animal name is : "+ this.animalName);}

    public static void main (String [] arg){
        AddAnimal tom = new AddAnimal("Tom");           //  step 1
        //AddAnimal jerry = new AddAnimal("Jerry");}      //  step 2

}

result :
--------

        animals in the zoo now : 1
        the new Animal name is : Tom

STACK DIAGRAM :

1) the main method loads at the bottom of the thread's stack frame, with it's local variable (tom)

                        THE STACK
            |---------------------------------|
            |                                 |  ------> this is called "Stack Frame"
            |---------------------------------|
            |                                 |
            |---------------------------------|
            |                                 |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   1-main()calls {AddName tom}   |
            |---------------------------------|

2) the variable "tom" refers to the constructor of the Object "AddName" causes 2 things : 1- creating an instance of the object "AddName" on the heap throw the overloaded constructor "AddName(String name);" 2- adding to it's arguments a reference to String object throw litrals holding
the value "tom" (this means a "String" Object is reachable on the heap's permenant Gen by now)

            |---------------------------------|
            |                                 |
            |---------------------------------|
            |                                 |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   2-AddName("Tom") {super()}    |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   1-main()calls {AddName tom}   |
            |---------------------------------|

3) the constructor of "AddName" with it's "super()" calls the Super Class no-arg's constructor which is "Zoo();", which creates a new instance of the object "Zoo" on the Heap

            |---------------------------------|
            |                                 |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   3-Zoo(){super();}             |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   2-AddName("Tom") {super();}   |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   1-main()calls {String tom;}   |
            |---------------------------------|

4) the constructor of "Zoo" with it's "super()" calls the Super Class no-arg's constructor which is "Object();", which is implicit by any class inheriting no other classes, so it implicitly inherits the "Object" class, creating an instance of the "Object" class on the heap

            |---------------------------------|
            |   4-Object(){}                  |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   3-Zoo(){super();}             |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   2-AddName("Tom") {super();}   |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   1-main()calls {String tom;}   |
            |---------------------------------|

5) Object() completes it's work and removed from the stack

            |---------------------------------|
            |                                 |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   3-Zoo(){super();}             |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   2-AddName("Tom") {super();}   |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   1-main()calls {String tom;}   |
            |---------------------------------|

6) Zoo completes it's work and now the static int "animalsInTheZoo" increased by "1"(*),and the console printed "animals in the zoo now : 1", and as the Zoo constructor reached it's curly brace "}", it is removed from the stack;

            |---------------------------------|
            |                                 |
            |---------------------------------|
            |                                 |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   2-AddName("Tom") {super();}   |
            |---------------------------------|
            |   1-main()calls {String tom;}   |
            |---------------------------------|

7) now as the super classes completed there work, back to our called constructor with it's new and ACTUALLY REQUIRED values, it starts doing it's work, giving the variable "animalName" the value "Tom", and printing out "the new Animal name is : Tom", then stack finds no methods or constructors to invoke, so the programme flow stops

**HINT : important to know that any method is invoked, a new stack frame is created for this method until it finishes then the stack frame is destroyed, this happened in step (6), when we called the constructor of "Zoo()", a method inside it is called for invokation, so the stack created a stack frame with this method, and completed it, then destroyed the method's stack frame, then destroyed the Zoo() stack frame, remember that "super();" call is alike a "method();" call but with slight differences, and the stack creates a new stack frame for both


HEAP DIAGRAM :

  • for the JVM, when you create an instance of an object (AddAnimal for example), it makes space for this object and all it's super classes till you reach the MEGA-SUPER class which is "Object", for our example, think about it on the heap like this :

     ___________________________       ______________________________________
    |      THREAD / STACK      |      | GARBAGE COLLECTABLE AREA ON THE HEAP |
    |_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\|      |_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\__|
    |                          |      |        ______________________        |
    |--------------------------|      |       |      AddAnimal       |       |
    |                          |      |       |   ________________   |       |
    |--------------------------|      |       |  |      Zoo       |  |       |    
    | Object(){}               |      |       |  |     ______     |  |       |
    |--------------------------|      |       |  |    |      |    |  |       |
    | Zoo(){super();}          |      |       |  |    |Object|    |  |       |  
    |--------------------------|      |       |  |    |______|    |  |       |    
    | AddAnimal(){super();}    |      |       |  |                |  |       |    
    |--------------------------|      |       |  |________________|  |       |    
    | main(){new AddAnimal();} |      |       |______________________|       |
    |__________________________|      |______________________________________|
    

    for the stack, each stack fram finishes it's call, it is emptied but for the heap, any "reachable object" throw the stack or throw created objects on it, it stays alive, and that's why the stack will destroy the stack frames calling the "super()" or the super class constructor, while the objects will stay alive on the heap similar to what's shown on the diagram, and the reason is

    the "AddAnimal" class can access any method of it's super classes any time it wants, so they are reachable, even if the current method call (on the stack) is not using them

RULES FOR CONSTRUCTOR (STUDY BY HEART) :

1- uses any access modifier

2- match the class name

3- must not have a return type

4- legal but STUPID to make a method with the same name of the class...but must have a return type.

5- default NO-ARG constructor is made automatically even if you dont see it

6- typing a NO-ARG constructor by your self will cancel the default un-seen one

7- the first statement of the constructor MUST be either a call to an overloaded constructor "this()" OR a call for a super class constructor "super()", and this one can be inserted implicitly by the compiler -if a constructor started with the statment "this()" pointing to another constructor, the compiler will know that this is not the final constructor in this class and the next (if the final constructor) must hold a "super()" keyword, if not, the compiler will implicitly put a NO-ARG "super()"

8- the "super()" can be a NO-ARG call, or can pass arguements to it according to the super class constructors holding parameters

9- you cannot make a call to an instance of ANY THING before the super constructor runs

10- only static variables or methods can be passed as arguments to this(x) or super(x)..like: super(superClassStaticVariable) or this(subClassStaticVariable)

11- ABSTRACT classes constructors are called when there concrete subclasses are instantiated

12- INTERFACES DONT HAVE constructors since they are not in the Object inheritence tree

13- the only way to invoke a constructor is within another constructor (alike this() and super())

14- you can create several overloaded constructors, and each constructor can be the final one if instantiated, in other words, you can have 7 overloaded constructors, all of them has there first line code is "super();", you dont have to make constructors call each other before going to the super class constructor, you can make the constructors final (throw "super();" call), or you can make them call each other (throw "this();" call) before reaching the final constructor which holds the "super();" call .. it's up to your design

NOTE : if 2 constructors in the same class are calling each other (starting with "this()"), the compiler wont find a problem, but when it passes it to the JVM, a STACK OVERFLOW exception will happen

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You would have us believe that doing new AddAnimal() will create an Object instance, a Zoo instance, and an AddAnimal instance as separate objects?? That's totally incorrect. –  Hot Licks Oct 4 '13 at 21:58
    
where is the separation here !!! This heap diagram is bassed upon SCJP 60and Orielly head first java. –  EL-conte De-monte TereBentikh Oct 5 '13 at 13:04

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