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During my spare time (as a learning exercise) I've been working on creating some templated containers and allocators in C++, similar to the ones provided as part of the Standard Template Library.

So far the containers I've made are Singly Linked List, Doubly Linked List, Stack, and Queue. The Stack and Queue both use the Singly Linked List as their internal structure, since I store both the head and tail pointers.

Now comes my first allocator class, the Pool Allocator. Internally it uses one of my Stack objects to Acquire and Release the pre-allocated objects. I would now like to use this Pool Allocator in conjuction with my Singly Linked List and Doubly Linked List in order to pre-allocate the internal Node objects which store the data. It seems to me like this now creates a circular dependency issue in my project.

My normal method of solving dependency issues like this on non-templated classes usually involves forward declarations, pointers, and splitting implementation into a cpp file. The problem seems to arise because I can't split template code declarations and implementations into their respective .h and .cpp files.

Some code for further reference:

SinglyLinkedList.h:

#include "PoolAllocator.h" //Adding this line creates a compile error

template<typename T> class SinglyLinkedList
{
private:
     Node<T> *_Head, *_Tail;
public:
     void PushFront( T *obj )
     {
          //Allocate new node object and set it as _Head
     }

     void PushBack( T *obj )
     {
          //Allocate new node object and set it as _Tail
     }

     T *PopFront()
     {
          //Remove _Head and return node data
     }
};

Stack.h:

#include "SinglyLinkedList.h"

template<typename T> class Stack
{
private:
     SinglyLinkedList<T> _List;
public:
     void Push( T *obj )
     {
          _List.PushFront( obj );
     }

     T *Pop ()
     {
          return _List.PopFront();
     }
};

PoolAllocator.h:

#include "Stack.h"

template<typename T> class PoolAllocator
{
private:
     Stack<T> _Pool;
public:
     void Initialize( unsigned int capacity )
     {
          //Dynamically allocate a bunch of T and push them onto _Pool
     }

     T *Acquire()
     {
          //Remove an item from _Pool and return it
     }

     void Release( T *obj )
     {
          //Push the object back onto the _Pool
     }

     void Dispose()
     {
          //Free all memory from _Pool
     }
};

I am a bit unsure on the best way to solve this issue. The only way I can think of would be to make the Pool Allocator not use any of my container classes. I suppose I could make an internal linked list class that is exclusive to the allocator class, but that seems like unnecessary code duplication.

If anyone has any insight on this I would be very glad to hear it. I hope I covered everything thoroughly enough and provided an acceptable code example. If there is any missing information please let me know. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
possible duplicate of Resolving a Circular Dependency between Template Classes –  Yochai Timmer Oct 4 '13 at 22:21
    
I forgot to put header guards in my example but they are there. I also tried that link with no luck :( –  Jimmy Roberts Oct 4 '13 at 22:29
    
Even if you could get this to compile, I don't see how it would work - in order to populate the Stack inside PoolAllocator, you push things onto it, which calls List.PushBack(), which would have to go to an uninitialized PoolAllocator to get the memory, right? –  Ben S. Oct 5 '13 at 0:15
    
@Ben - The PoolAllocator object makes sure it is auto initialized if the Acquire or Release methods are called before Initialize –  Jimmy Roberts Oct 5 '13 at 1:30

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