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Could someone assist me or head me in the right direction to implement the basic FVFs from DirectX in GLSL code? I completely understand how to create a program, apply VBOs and all that, but I'm having great difficulty in the actual creation of the shaders. Namely:

transformed+lit (x,y,color,specular,tu,tv)
lit (x,y,z,color,specular,tu,tv)
unlit (x,y,z,nx,ny,nz,tu,tv) [material/lights]

With this, I'd be given enough to implement far more interesting shaders.

So, I'm not asking for a mechanism to deal with FVFs. I'm simply asking, for the shader code, given the proper streams. I understand that the unlit and lit versions rely on passing in matrices and I completely understand the concept. I am just having trouble finding shader examples showing these concepts.

share|improve this question
    
This concept does not really exist in OpenGL. A long time ago, there were a couple of pretty inflexible interleaved formats but they never approached the level of sophistication of D3D's FVF, with its vertex attributes for things like vertex blending, specular, etc. You would be better off ditching FVF and adopting a true shader-centric vertex buffer system. Even in D3D9, FVF is deprecated in favor of vertex declarations. This is the technique you should be targeting if you want cross-API portability. –  Andon M. Coleman Oct 5 '13 at 0:52
    
As I was saying, glInterleavedArrays (...) is the closest thing OpenGL has ever had to FVF, and that will not even work with vertex shaders in modern OpenGL. –  Andon M. Coleman Oct 5 '13 at 0:54
    
I'm looking specifically for a shader implementation in GLSL of those FVFs. –  PhoenixX_2 Oct 5 '13 at 0:59
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2 Answers 2

Okay. If you have troubles finding working shaders, there is example (Honestly, you can find it at any OpenGL book).

This shader program will use your object's world matrix and camera's matrices to transform vertices, and then map one texture to pixels and lit them with one directional light, (according to material properties and light direction).

Vertex shader:

#version 330

// Vertex input layout
attribute vec3 inPosition;
attribute vec3 inNormal;
attribute vec4 inVertexCol;
attribute vec2 inTexcoord;
attribute vec3 inTangent;
attribute vec3 inBitangent;

// Output
struct PSIn
{
    vec3 normal;
    vec4 vertexColor;
    vec2 texcoord;
    vec3 tangent;
    vec3 bitangent;
};

out PSIn psin;

// Uniform buffers
layout(std140)
uniform CameraBuffer
{
    mat4 mtxView;
    mat4 mtxProj;
    vec3 cameraPosition;
};

layout(std140)
uniform ObjectBuffer
{
    mat4 mtxWorld;
};

void main()
{
    // transform position
    vec4 pos = vec4(inPosition, 1.0f);
    pos = mtxWorld * pos;
    pos = mtxView * pos;
    pos = mtxProj * pos;
    gl_Position = pos;

    // just pass-through other stuff
    psin.normal = inNormal;
    psin.tangent = inTangent;
    psin.bitangent = inBitangent;
    psin.texcoord = inTexcoord;
    psin.vertexColor = inVertexCol;
}

And fragment shader:

#version 330

// Input
in vec3 position;
in vec3 normal;
in vec4 vertexColor;
in vec2 texcoord;
in vec3 tangent;
in vec3 bitangent;

// Output
out vec4 fragColor;

// Uniforms
uniform sampler2D sampler0;

layout(std140)
uniform CameraBuffer
{
    mat4 mtxView;
    mat4 mtxProj;
    vec3 cameraPosition;
};

layout(std140) 
uniform ObjectBuffer
{
    mat4 mtxWorld;
};

layout(std140) 
uniform LightBuffer
{
    vec3 lightDirection;
};

struct Material
{
    float Ka;  // ambient quotient
    float Kd;  // diffuse quotient
    float Ks;  // specular quotient
    float A;   // shininess
};

layout(std140) 
uniform MaterialBuffer
{
    Material material;
};

    // function to calculate pixel lighting
float Lit( Material material, vec3 pos, vec3 nor, vec3 lit, vec3 eye )
{
    vec3 V = normalize( eye - pos );
    vec3 R = reflect( lit, nor);

    float Ia = material.Ka;
    float Id = material.Kd * clamp( dot(nor, -lit), 0.0f, 1.0f );
    float Is = material.Ks * pow( clamp(dot(R,V), 0.0f, 1.0f), material.A );
    return Ia + Id + Is;
}

void main() 
{   
    vec3 nnormal = normalize(normal);
    vec3 ntangent = normalize(tangent);
    vec3 nbitangent = normalize(bitangent);

    vec4 outColor = texture(sampler0, texcoord); // texture mapping

    outColor *=  Lit( material, position, nnormal, lightDirection, cameraPosition ); // lighting

    outColor.w = 1.0f;

    fragColor = outColor;
}

If you don't want texturing, just don't sample texture, but equate outColor to vertexColor.

If you don't need lighting, just comment out Lit() function.

Edit: For 2D objects you can still use same program, but many of functionality will be redundant. You can strip out:

  • camera
  • light
  • material
  • all of vertex attributes, but inPosition and inTexcoord (maybe also inVertexCol, f you need vertices to have color) and all of code related with unneeded attributes
  • inPosition can be vec2
  • you will need to pass orthographic projection matrix instead of perspective one
  • you can even strip out matrices, and pass vertex buffer with positions in pixels. See my answer here about how to transform those pixel positions to screen space positions. You can do it either in C/C++ code or in GLSL/HLSL.

Hope it helps somehow.

share|improve this answer
    
What's the purpose of tint? And what about the case with UI elements where the locations are 2D and relative to the screen? Just pass in appropriately setup matrices? –  PhoenixX_2 Oct 11 '13 at 18:40
    
tint was just a color to tincture certain object (for debug purposes or on mouse over, for example). I've edited answer and removed it, as it was not used in shader program. Also I've added info about 2D. –  Drop Oct 11 '13 at 18:45
    
And this is all OpenGL ES compatible I presume? –  PhoenixX_2 Oct 13 '13 at 13:06
    
@PhoenixX_2, depends on OpenGL ES version. For example, OpenGL ES2 not supports uniform buffers. You will need split them to single uniform variables. –  Drop Oct 13 '13 at 14:30
    
Does that simply mean expanding things out of the uniform blocks into individual variables? –  PhoenixX_2 Oct 13 '13 at 17:44
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Intro

You've not specified OpenGL/GLSL version that you targeting, so I'll assume that it is at least OpenGL 3.

One of the main advantages of programmable pipeline, to be compared with with fixed-function pipeline, is fully customizable vertex input. I'm not quite sure, if it is a good idea to introduce such constraints as fixed vertex format. For what?.. (You will find modern approach in paragraph "Another way" of my post)

But, if you really want to emulate fixed-function...

  1. I think you'll need to have a vertex shader for each vertex format you have, or somehow generate vertex shader on the fly. Or even for all of the shader stages.

    For example, for x, y, color, tu, tv input you will have vertex shader such as:

    attribute vec2 inPosition;
    attribute vec4 inCol;
    attribute vec2 inTexcoord;
    
    void main()
    {
    ...
    }
    
  2. As you don't have transforms, light and materials fixed-functionality in OpenGL 3, you must implement it yourself:

    • You must pass matrices for transformations
    • For lit shader you must pass additional variables, such as light direction
    • For material shader you must have materials in input

    Typically, in shader, you do it with uniforms or uniform blocks:

    layout(std140)
    uniform CameraBuffer
    {
        mat4 mtxView;
        mat4 mtxProj;
        vec3 cameraPosition;
    };
    
    layout(std140) 
    uniform ObjectBuffer
    {
        mat4 mtxWorld;
    };
    
    layout(std140) 
    uniform LightBuffer
    {
        vec3 lightDirection;
    };
    
    struct Material
    {
        float Ka; 
        float Kd; 
        float Ks;
        float A;
    };
    
    layout(std140) 
    uniform MaterialBuffer
    {
        Material material;
    };
    
  3. Probably, you can somehow combine all of shaders with different formats , uniforms, etc. in one big ubershader with branching.

Another way

You can stick to modern approach and just allow user to declare vertex format he wants (format, that he used in his shader). Just implement concept similar to IDirect3DDevice9::CreateVertexDeclaration or ID3D11Device::CreateInputLayout: you will make use of glVertexAttribPointer() and, probably, VAOs. This way you can also abstract out vertex layout, in API-independent way.

The main ideas are:

  • user passes an array of structures that describes format in API-independent way to your function (this struct can be similar to D3DVERTEXELEMENT9 or D3D11_INPUT_ELEMENT_DESC)
  • that function interpret array's elements one by one and builds some kind of internal info that describes format in API-specific way (such as IDirect3DVertexDeclaration9 for D3D9, ID3D11InputLayout for D3D11 or custom struct or VAO for OpenGL)
  • when it's time to set vertex format you just use this info

P.S. If you need ideas on how to properly implement light, materials in GLSL (I mean algorithms here), you'd better pick up some book or online tutorials, than asking here. Or just Google up "GLSL lighting". You can find interesting these links:

Happy coding!

share|improve this answer
    
Honestly, in reference to your #1, I was looking for a complete version of what you started showing for transformed and for lit. I could likely build unlit from there. I just want an example showing it so I can do it the proper way. I've already got a general understanding of how to implement materials by hand using DirectX assembler shaders, so I'm just wanting something OpenGL-specific. –  PhoenixX_2 Oct 5 '13 at 15:48
    
@PhoenixX_2 for lighting, just pick a book or tutoral from links in P.S. If you need lighting shader, why then you asking about FVF? Wait, you've said DirectX assembler? O_O Oh noes, you kidding? –  Drop Oct 5 '13 at 16:00
    
Okay let me rephrase again. Could you show me what a shader would look like that would take screen co-ordinates with color/specular and have it work similar to DirectX 7 so I can move away from my current working implementation of OpenGL without shaders to one with shaders that would be compatible with OpenGL ES 2 :)? –  PhoenixX_2 Oct 5 '13 at 16:04
    
@PhoeniXX_2: You want per-vertex lighting, you probably will not find a whole lot of implementations of this using shaders. It almost defeats the purpose of using shaders in the first place, most tutorials will have you skip per-vertex lighting and skip directly to doing lighting in the fragment shader. Go ahead and stop thinking about trying to reproduce fixed-function behavior and start fresh using modern approaches, you will save yourself a lot of time and frustration in the end. –  Andon M. Coleman Oct 5 '13 at 20:07
    
@AndonM.Coleman I am trying to build that better system. I still need to come up with shaders for UI elements though, which doesn't use per-pixel lighting. –  PhoenixX_2 Oct 5 '13 at 20:49
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