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How do I prevent a particular class from being subclassed? I am not aware of such functionality (say final keyword for example) in the language. However Apple says it has done so for all classes in AddressBookUI.framework (in iOS)

For educational purposes, how can I achieve the same functionality, or how would they have done such thing?

From iOS7 Release Notes(Requires login) :

enter image description here

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1  
possible duplicate of Preventing subclasses overriding methods – trojanfoe Oct 5 '13 at 8:03
    
I think this question is not the same as that because I wanted to prevent subclassing not just preventing overriding a single method. – nacho4d Dec 30 '15 at 14:56

Here's one way: override allocWithZone: from within your "final" class (substituting MyFinalClassName for your actual class name) like this:

+ (id)allocWithZone:(struct _NSZone *)zone
{
    if (self != [MyFinalClassName class]) {
        NSAssert(nil, @"Subclassing MyFinalClassName not allowed.");
        return nil;
    }

    return [super allocWithZone:zone];
}

This will prevent a subclass that is not a member of MyFinalClassName from being alloc'ed (and therefore init'ed as well), since NSObject's allocWithZone: must be called eventually, and by refusing to call super from your "final" class, you will prevent this.

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I thought kind of the same... but couldn't I override class method in the subclass to return the original class Class? If so then I could pass above check... – nacho4d Oct 5 '13 at 6:57
    
Good question, possibly. But that would almost certainly cause other nasty side effects even if it worked to bypass this check. A more likely workaround I can think of would be using method swizzling to provide a normal implementation of allocWithZone:. I guess the question is, what would be the use case of needing such bulletproof subclassing prevention? – smileyborg Oct 5 '13 at 6:59
    
It is still unclear to me how they are doing so... swizzling would allow me to be able to subclass it ( i think), but I cannot think of a way it would help me to prevent subclassing. Now I have no purpose other than educational ones. But in case of ABAddressBookUI.framework security should be a matter, We (regular users) don't want third party applications to get more data/info that we are willing to give them. – nacho4d Oct 5 '13 at 7:10
    
I don't think Apple is solving security/data access by preventing subclassing. According to the Notes you copied in your question, if you're linking to one of the pre-iOS 7 SDKs, you're still allowed to subclass (just get a console warning about it). If somehow you could gain access to things you shouldn't be able to using a subclass of AddressBookUI, I'm sure Apple would have immediately prevented this. I'm not sure exactly why they don't want you to subclass in this case, but it's probably to encourage better design/architecture, or for optimizations, or something along those lines. – smileyborg Oct 5 '13 at 7:15
    
Using objc_getClass() would work regardless of the implementation of +class. The Apple notes, though, suggest the check is in the -init... method(s). You could try to swizzle your way past it, but you would probably break the instances or be forced to largely reimplement them. – Ken Thomases Oct 5 '13 at 12:55

There's a simpler way to prevent subclassing in Xcode 6 as a result of Swift interop. To prevent Swift classes from being subclassed in Objective-C the objc_subclassing_restricted is added to all class definitions in the {ProjectName}-Swift.h file.

You can use this in your projects:

#if defined(__has_attribute) && __has_attribute(objc_subclassing_restricted)
# define FOO_FINAL __attribute__((objc_subclassing_restricted))
#else
# define FOO_FINAL
#endif

FOO_FINAL
@interface Foo : NSObject
@end

@interface Bar : Foo
@end

The compiler will halt on the definition of Bar with Cannot subclass a class with objc_subclassing_restricted attribute

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May I ask why is not a good idea to subclass swift classes in objc-c? I have not used swift yet :) – nacho4d Dec 11 '14 at 7:41
1  
I cannot find any explicit reason in the documentation, just that you can't. One reason alluded to in "Using Swift with Cocoa and Objective-C" is that your subclass would have to use the "{PRODUCT}-Swift.h" header and referencing it form Swift would require the "{PRODUCT}-Bridging.h" header creating a cyclical dependency. It's also possible that you would lose some Swift class integrity safeguards in the subclass. That's just a guess though. – Brian Nickel Dec 11 '14 at 17:13
    
From the Swift documentation: "You cannot subclass a Swift class in Objective-C" developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/Swift/Conceptual/… – ThomasW Sep 17 '15 at 6:15
    
Of course, this solution only restricts Objective-C subclassing. You can still subclass using Swift. – ThomasW Sep 17 '15 at 6:19

Here is possible solution:

@interface FinalClass : NSObject

@end

@implementation FinalClass

- (id)init
{
    if (self.class != [FinalClass class]) {
        return nil;
    }
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        // instance initialization
    }
    return self;
}

@end

@interface InvalidSubclass : FinalClass

@end

@implementation InvalidSubclass

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {

    }
    return self;
}

@end

I'm not sure this is 100% guaranteed because it's runtime-checking anyway, but it should be enough to block and warn people that they should not subclass this. Subclass might skip superclass's init, but then the instance will not be usable because it's not fully initialised by superclass.

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Something like the following will ensure that every time an "impossible subclass" calls +alloc, an object will be allocated that is an instance of FinalClass, and not the subclass. This is essentially what NSObject's +alloc method does, but here we specify an explicit class to create. This is how NSObject allocates instances (in Obj-C 2), but there is no guarantee this will always be the case, so you may want to add an appropriate -dealloc which calls object_dispose. This method also means you don't get a nil object back if you try to instantiate a subclass - you do get an instance of FinalClass.

@interface FinalClass: NSObject
//...
+ (id)alloc; // Optional
@end

// ...

#import <objc/runtime.h>
@implementation FinalClass

+ (id)alloc {

    if (![self isMemberOfClass:[FinalClass class]]) {
        // Emit warning about invalid subclass being ignored.
    }

    self = class_createInstance([FinalClass class], 0);
    if (self == nil) {
        // Error handling
    }
    return self;
}

@end

@interface InvalidSubclass : FinalClass
// Anything not in FinalClass will not work as +alloc will
// create a FinalClass instance.
@end

Note: I'm not sure I'd use this myself - specifying that a class shouldn't be subclassed is more in the nature of a design-contract with the programmer rather than an enforced rule at compile- or runtime.

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You actually would need to override allocWithZone: as I've shown in my answer to this question, because alloc just calls allocWithZone: (and therefore would be trivial to bypass with your approach above). – smileyborg Oct 5 '13 at 18:36

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