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DISCLAIMER: Java developer learning C++.

What happens when you return a string held inside an deleted dynamic object?

here's a fairly standard dequeue method and I want to make it work without using a pointer for the templated data, which is a string in my test case.

g++ on Ubuntu 13.04 gives me segfault. On the latest OSX, my data is corrupted.

Is it my code or C++?

// remove an object from the front of the queue.
// the test case instantiate T as string. 
// front->data is assigned an static string.
template<class T>
T & SomeQueue<T>::dequeue() {
    if (empty()) throw runtime_error("kaboom");

    T tmp = front->data;
    Node<T> *n = front;
    front = front->next;
    delete n;

    return tmp;
};
share|improve this question
1  
Define "string". If you mean a char * and are using Node<char*> as the underlying type, then simply don't do that. Use std::string as the formal node type. And in fact, use std::queue<std::string> instead and avoid all the head-slamming on the table. – WhozCraig Oct 5 '13 at 7:56
up vote 4 down vote accepted

As john says, the copy of the deleted object is fine. It crashes because you are returning a reference to a local variable (tmp). When the function returns, this object no longer exists, so you can't use it. Change T & SomeQueue<T>::dequeue into T SomeQueue<T>::dequeue so you return a copy of a T object, rather than a reference.

(And, if you enable warnings when you compile, most compilers will tell you about this sort of thing).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 One little ampersand. I didn't even see it. Nice catch, sir. – WhozCraig Oct 5 '13 at 7:57
    
reference is a wonderful idea. i'm sure i'll master it someday. :) – kel c. Oct 5 '13 at 8:14
    
You can do most things with references, but you should NEVER return a reference to something that will disappear! – Mats Petersson Oct 5 '13 at 8:17

This code is OK, because you copied the string before deleteing the object. The cause of the segfault is something else.

Correction:

The problem is here

template<class T>
T & SomeQueue<T>::dequeue() {

should be

template<class T>
T SomeQueue<T>::dequeue() {

don't return references to local variables. The local variable is destroyed, that's what's giving you a reference to something that has been destroyed.

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That code is just fine, the reason for segfault is that you are returning a reference to a local variable which gets destroyed upon function exit.

T tmp = front->data;
Node<T> *n = front;
front = front->next;
delete n;

return tmp; //tmp is a local variable here. You are returning a reference (T&)
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