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How can I know if a certain port is open/closed on linux ubuntu, not a remote system, using python? How can I list these open ports in python?

  • Netstat: Is there a way to integrate netstat output with python?
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You can using the socket module to simply check if a port is open or not.

It would look something like this.

import socket;
sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
result = sock.connect_ex(('127.0.0.1',80))
if result == 0:
   print "Port is open"
else:
   print "Port is not open"
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5  
This has obvious drawbacks that shall be noted: simply attempt to check connection could 1) fail due to firewall or temporary overflow, 2) trigger an unwanted reaction to connect attempt in case of any active protection, 3) simply spoil logs and statistics... Checking using specially dedicated tools as netstat is commonly preferred. – Netch Dec 22 '13 at 7:56
    
@Netch -- this is really handy when you are on a box you don't want to install extra tools on and need to check if a remote port is open . . . – Wyatt Barnett Dec 15 '14 at 20:13
    
@WyattBarnett netstat is not an extra tool (at least on *nix) :) – Pitto Sep 17 '15 at 9:46
    
I published another answer with a quick jot of how I'd handle the temporary overflow issue, @Netch :) – Pitto Dec 17 '15 at 14:45
    
Works on Windows, too. – maciek May 6 at 9:04

If you only care about the local machine, you can rely on the psutil package. You can either:

  1. Check all ports used by a specific pid:

    proc = psutil.Process(pid)
    print proc.connections()
    
  2. Check all ports used on the local machine:

    print psutil.net_connections()
    

It works on Windows too.

http://pythonhosted.org/psutil/

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1  
I usually avoid non-stdlib solutions, but gdi, psutil should just be in the stdlib, its too dang essential. – ThorSummoner Mar 13 at 20:55

If you want to use this in a more general context, you should make sure, that the socket that you open also gets closed. So the check should be more like this:

import socket
from contextlib import closing

def check_socket(host, port):
    with closing(socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)) as sock:
        if sock.connect_ex((host, port)) == 0:
            print "Port is open"
        else:
            print "Port is not open"
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Netstat tool simply parses some /proc files like /proc/net/tcp and combines it with other files contents. Yep, it's highly platform specific, but for Linux-only solution you can stick with it. Linux kernel documentation describes these files in details so you can find there how to read them.

Please also notice your question is too ambiguous because "port" could also mean serial port (/dev/ttyS* and analogs), parallel port, etc.; I've reused understanding from another answer this is network port but I'd ask you to formulate your questions more accurately.

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Just added to mrjandro's solution a quick hack to get rid of simple connection errors / timeouts.

You can adjust the threshold changing max_error_count variable value and add notifications of any sort.

import socket

max_error_count = 10

def increase_error_count():
    # Quick hack to handle false Port not open errors 
    with open('ErrorCount.log') as f:
        for line in f:
            error_count = line
    error_count = int(error_count)
    print "Error counter: " + str(error_count)
    file = open('ErrorCount.log', 'w')
    file.write(str(error_count + 1))
    file.close()
    if error_count == max_error_count:
        # Send email, pushover, slack or do any other fancy stuff
        print "Sending out notification"
        # Reset error counter so it won't flood you with notifications
        file = open('ErrorCount.log', 'w')
        file.write('0')
        file.close()

sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
result = sock.connect_ex(('127.0.0.1',80))
if result == 0:
        print "Port is open"
else:
        print "Port is not open"
        increase_error_count()

And here you find a Python 3 compatible version (just fixed print syntax):

import socket

max_error_count = 10

def increase_error_count():
    # Quick hack to handle false Port not open errors
    with open('ErrorCount.log') as f:
        for line in f:
            error_count = line
    error_count = int(error_count)
    print ("Error counter: " + str(error_count))
    file = open('ErrorCount.log', 'w')
    file.write(str(error_count + 1))
    file.close()
    if error_count == max_error_count:
        # Send email, pushover, slack or do any other fancy stuff
        print ("Sending out notification")
        # Reset error counter so it won't flood you with notifications
        file = open('ErrorCount.log', 'w')
        file.write('0')
        file.close()

sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
result = sock.connect_ex(('127.0.0.1',80))
if result == 0:
        print ("Port is open")
else:
        print ("Port is not open")
        increase_error_count()
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// , NIIIIIICE. Does this work on Python 3? – Nathan Basanese Jan 11 at 21:17
    
Hi there! You just need some minor changes to the print functions in there... Check the new version I pasted :) You can easily change it to not save data to a log file, for example. – Pitto Jan 12 at 2:01

For me the examples above would hang if the port wasn't open. Line 4 shows use of settimeout to prevent hanging

import socket

sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
sock.settimeout(2)                                      #2 Second Timeout
result = sock.connect_ex(('127.0.0.1',80))
if result == 0:
  print 'port OPEN'
else:
  print 'port CLOSED, connect_ex returned: '+str(result)
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