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My friend gave me a riddle. I run it. but not getting expected output. Code is:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
int main()
{
       while(1)
       {
              fprintf(stdout,"hello-out");
              fprintf(stderr,"hello-err");
              sleep(1);
       }
       return 0;
}

the output doesn't printing hello-out. Instead it's printing like this infinitely:

hello-errhello-errhello-errhello-errhello-errhello-errhello-errhello-errhello-errhello-err

Then I tried like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
int main() 
{
     int i = 0;

     while(i <= 5)
     {
          fprintf(stdout,"hello-out");
          fprintf(stderr,"hello-err");
          sleep(1);
          i++;
     }
     return 0;
}

the optput is:

hello-errhello-errhello-errhello-errhello-errhello-errhello-outhello-outhello-outhello-outhello-outhello-out

In C language instructions execute line by line. But why it is not following here?

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1  
A C program has two output streams. It is up to your platform how it presents those. Unless you make an effort to record the two streams separately, it won't be terribly illuminating to worry about this. –  Kerrek SB Oct 5 '13 at 10:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

File IO behavior is determined by the system and if you want to keep that order you must explicitly fflush. See this program below:

     while(i <= 5)
     {
          fprintf(stdout,"hello-out");
          fflush(stdout);
          fprintf(stderr,"hello-err");
          fflush(stderr);
          sleep(1);
          i++;
     }
share|improve this answer

The reason is output buffering.

By default, stdout is buffered: if it's connected to a terminal it's line-buffered, otherwise it's fully-buffered. When it's line-buffered, that means that nothing is printed until you print a newline, the buffer fills up, or the buffer is flushed explicitly. Since you're not printing newlines, the output doesn't show up until the program exits, because all stdio buffers are flushed at that time.

stderr, on the other hand, is not buffered by default. So anything written to it appears immediately.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the buffering of stdout info. Makes it much clear. –  Manoj Awasthi Oct 5 '13 at 10:24

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