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I am looking to create two dictionaries from a list of nested lists:

M = {index of list: list}

N = {index of list: reversed list}

Example:

For starters I have the following list:

L =  [[20, 56], [23, 24], [23, 12], [22, 21], [26, 48], [26, 24]]

so the end result would be:

M = {0: [56, 20], 1: [24, 23], 2: [12, 23], 3: [21, 22], 4: [48, 26], 5: [24, 26]}
N = {0: [20, 56], 1: [23, 24], 2: [23, 12], 3: [22, 21], 4: [26, 48], 5: [26, 24]}

I have tried this out:

M = {}
N = {}
for index, pair in enumerate(L):
    M[index] = pair
    N[index] = pair.reverse()

but the result of this is:

M = {0: [56, 20], 1: [24, 23], 2: [12, 23], 3: [21, 22], 4: [48, 26], 5: [24, 26]}
N = {0: [56, 20], 1: [24, 23], 2: [12, 23], 3: [21, 22], 4: [48, 26], 5: [24, 26]}

I have solved it by doing:

N[index] = pair[::-1]

but could someone please tell me why this is happening?

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3  
I'm not sure I believe your results. .reverse() acts in-place and returns None, so shouldn't you get N == {0: None, 1: None, 2: None, 3: None, 4: None, 5: None}? –  DSM Oct 5 '13 at 16:30

3 Answers 3

list.reverse is an in-place operation, as keys in both dicts point to the same object so all references are affected.

>>> a = [1, 2, 3]
>>> b = a
>>> a.reverse()
>>> a
[3, 2, 1]
>>> b
[3, 2, 1]

To get a new reversed copy of a list you can use a[::-1] or list(reversed(a)).

>>> a = [1, 2, 3]
>>> b = a[::-1]
>>> b is a
False
>>> b = list(reversed(a))
>>> b is a
False

But a[::-1] should be always preferred over list(reversed(a)) if you want a reversed list, if you want an iterator go for reversed(a).

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ok gotcha. I forgot that a name and an object are not the same in python. –  grasshopper Oct 5 '13 at 16:32

As mentioned by @hcwhsa list.reverse will do a in place which will modify the list. If you don't want to do the in place you could do the following:

>>> l[::-1]
[3, 2, 1]
>>> l
[1, 2, 3]
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An alternative way to get a list/string/tuple in reverse order is a[::-1]. That returns the elements of a from last to first, as a copy--without modifying a.

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