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I need help in optimizing this query.

  SELECT messages.*
   FROM messages
   INNER JOIN subscription ON subscription.entity_id = messages.entity_id
   WHERE subscription.user_id = 1
   ORDER BY messages.timestamp DESC 
   LIMIT 50

Without the limit, this query returns 200K rows and takes about 1.3 - 2 seconds to run. The problem seems to be in the order by clause. Without it, the query takes .0005 seconds .

Indexes:
    ( subscription.user_id, subscription.entity_id )
    ( subscription.entity_id )
    ( messages.timestamp )
    ( messages.entity_id, messages.timestamp )

I was able to improve the performance by changing the query to this:

SELECT messages.* FROM messages
INNER JOIN subscription ON subscription.entity_id = messages.entity_id 
INNER JOIN ( 
   SELECT message_id FROM messages ORDER BY timestamp DESC
) as temp on temp.messsage_id = messages.message_id
WHERE subscription.user_id = 1 LIMIT 50

This runs in .12 seconds. A very nice improvement but i'd like to know if it could be better. It seems If I could somehow filter the 2nd inner join then things will be faster.

Thanks.

SCHEMA:

   messages 
      message_id, entity_id, message, timestamp

   subscription
      user_id, entity_id

UPDATE

Raymond Nijland's Answer solves my initial problem, but another just cropped up

 SELECT messages.*
   FROM messages
   STRAIGHT_JOIN subscription ON subscription.entity_id = messages.entity_id
   WHERE subscription.user_id = 1
   ORDER BY messages.timestamp DESC 
   LIMIT 50

The straight join is inefficient in two cases:

  1. there is no user_id entry in the subscription table

  2. there are few relevant entries in the messages table

Any suggestions on how to fix this? if not from a query perspective, an application one?

UPDATE

EXPLAIN INFO

LIMIT 50

| id | select_type | table             | type   | possible_keys                           | key           | key_len | ref                                    | rows | Extra       |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | messages          | index  | idx_timestamp                           | idx_timestamp | 4       | NULL                                   |   50 |             |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | subscription      | eq_ref | PRIMARY,entity_id,user_id               | PRIMARY       | 16      | const, messages.entity_id              |    1 | Using index |

Without Limit

| id | select_type | table             | type   | possible_keys                           | key           | key_len | ref                                    |   rows   | Extra         |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | messages          | ALL    | entity_id_2,entity_id                   | NULL          | NULL    | NUL                                    |   255069 | Using filesort|
|  1 | SIMPLE      | subscription      | eq_ref | PRIMARY,entity_id,user_id               | PRIMARY       | 16      | const, messages.entity_id              |        1 | Using index   |

CREATE TABLE STATEMENTS:

With ~5000 rows

subscription | CREATE TABLE `subscription` (
  `user_id`   bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `entity_id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`user_id`,`entity_id`),
  KEY `entity_id` (`entity_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8

with ~255,000 rows

messages | CREATE TABLE `messages` (
  `message_id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `entity_id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `message` varchar(255) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `timestamp` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`message_id`),
  KEY `entity_id` (`entity_id`,`timestamp`),
  KEY `idx_timestamp` (`timestamp`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 
share|improve this question
1  
Can you post the show create table statements? –  Raymond Nijland Oct 5 '13 at 17:39
    
200 thousand rows for a single user? Are you sure about that? –  Dan Bracuk Oct 5 '13 at 20:50
    
@DanBracuk yes I am sure –  Jason M Oct 5 '13 at 23:05
    
Can you run an EXPLAIN on no user_id case and few relevant entries in the messages case and post the results here? –  Raymond Nijland Oct 6 '13 at 16:06
1  
If you want us to help optimize a query, you need to show us the table and index definitions, as well as row counts for each of the tables. Maybe your tables are defined poorly. Maybe the indexes aren't created correctly. Maybe you don't have an index on that column you thought you did. Without seeing the table and index definitions, we can't tell. We also need row counts because that can affect query optimization greatly. If you know how to do an EXPLAIN or get an execution plan, put the results in the question as well. –  Andy Lester Oct 6 '13 at 17:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Drop the index messages.entity_id this one is Redundant and try an straight_join i think the mysql optimizer is accesing your tables in the wrong order. MySQL need to access table messages first so it can use the index on messages(entity_id, timestamp) and remove the need for an "Using temporary; Using filesort" (what is slow if MySQL needs to create an MyISAM disk based table and needed to sort (quicksort algoritm) this with disk I/O reads and I/O writes).

 SELECT STRAIGHT_JOIN messages.*
   FROM messages
   INNER JOIN subscription ON subscription.entity_id = messages.entity_id
   WHERE subscription.user_id = 1
   ORDER BY messages.timestamp DESC 
   LIMIT 50

OR

 SELECT messages.*
   FROM messages
   STRAIGHT_JOIN subscription ON subscription.entity_id = messages.entity_id
   WHERE subscription.user_id = 1
   ORDER BY messages.timestamp DESC 
   LIMIT 50

I've also had this problem and i fixed it like this http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/b34870/1 but then with Country / City tables

Edit because off Jason M reaction on the STRAIGHT_JOIN

The straight join is inefficient in two cases:

there is no user_id entry in the subscription table

Indeed the MySQL optimizer with INNER JOIN would trigger an "Impossible WHERE noticed after reading const tables" and never executes the query. But an STRAIGHT_JOIN doens't trigger an "Impossible WHERE noticed after reading const tables" so an (maybe full) index scan needs to be done to find it's user_id value that could slow down query execution. Easy fix would be: use existing user_id's with the STRAIGHT_JOIN

there are few relevant entries in the messages table

Possible same problem here MySQL thinks it should do an (maybe full) index scan to find results. but i need to see an EXPLAIN statement to know for sure

You may also want to try this query first

SELECT 
 *
FROM (

 SELECT
  entity_id

 FROM
  subscriptions

 WHERE
  subscription.user_id = 1 
)
 subscriptions

INNER JOIN 
 messages

ON
 subscriptions.entity_id = messages.entity_id

ORDER BY
 messages.timestamp DESC

LIMIT 50  
share|improve this answer
1  
Filesort is not necessarily slow. And is a misnomer, it does not mean that is performed through a disk file! –  ypercube Oct 5 '13 at 17:53
    
i know... I mean the combination "Using temporary; Using filesort" what could result in sorting an MyISAM disk based temporary table with quicksort algorithm and lot of disk IO –  Raymond Nijland Oct 5 '13 at 17:56
    
Thanks Raymond, this absolutely solved my problem. Query now runs in .000x seconds –  Jason M Oct 5 '13 at 17:57
    
@ypercube and i'am not complety sure filesort will NOT trigger disk based IO because off this line IO_CACHE tempfile, buffpek_pointers, *outfile; in sql/filesort.cc this means that an filesort could trigger some disk bases IO writes and reads but i've not completly analysed this part off the source code –  Raymond Nijland Oct 5 '13 at 18:00
    
@ypercube but thanks i've updated the answer about the filesort.. –  Raymond Nijland Oct 5 '13 at 18:02

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