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I get a segmentation fault when I alter the location in the function where I call malloc from. This code works fine and prints the "End\n".

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main() {    

    int **pptr;
    if (!( *pptr = malloc(4) ))
        return 1;

    int *ptr;
    if (!( ptr = malloc(4) ))
        return 1;

    ptr[0]= 1;
    printf("Point 1\n");

    free(ptr);

    (*pptr)[0] = 1;

    free(*pptr);
    printf("End\n");
    return 0;
}

However this seemingly equivalent code ends before "Point 1\n" from a segmentation fault.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main() {    

    int *ptr;
    if (!( ptr = malloc(4) ))
        return 1;

    ptr[0]= 1;
    printf("Point 1\n");

    free(ptr);

    int **pptr;
    if (!( *pptr = malloc(4) ))
        return 1;
    (*pptr)[0] = 1;

    free(*pptr);
    printf("End\n");
    return 0;
}

What am I missing? (I'm a bit of a beginner)

Other information: I'm using Netbeans under Ubuntu, using gcc.

share|improve this question
    
First read how to use malloc! – haccks Oct 5 '13 at 17:42
    
I read among other things the reference page of cplusplus.com/reference/cstdlib/malloc. Sorry for the silly errors but I thought I was allocating 4 bytes (the size of an int in my system) and then assigning the pointer to that location to my pointer, and then checking if its null, just in case. Maybe other noobs are having the same confusion. – niic Oct 5 '13 at 17:47
up vote 5 down vote accepted

In both programs, you are invoking undefined behavior here:

int **pptr;
if (!( *pptr = malloc(4) ))
    return 1;

pptr is an uninitialized pointer that is being dereferenced to store the pointer returned by malloc. Due to undefined behavior, the first just happens to look like it is working, but is corrupting memory where ever pptr happens to be pointing.

The second fails because pptr happens to point to a region of memory that can't be written to.

In addition, since in the above code an int* is being allocated, malloc(4) is unsafe. Use malloc(sizeof(int*)). 64-bit systems typically have 8-byte pointers, for example.

share|improve this answer

What is sizeof(int)? If it's > 4 then yes, you are invoking undefined behavior.

When invoking undefined behavior, yes, order can matter. Anything can matter. Whether your system time is even or odd at start of run of program can (but probably won't) matter. That's what undefined means.

In this case, I suspect the two mallocs somehow informed your compiler on what memory to allocate, and you "got lucky" in the first case in that it happened to be overwriting to writeable space. Of course in the larger scheme you got unlucky, since I suspect you failed silently.

Anyway, start by making the program correct, then figure out what your UB is, then figure out what implementation details may have caused it.

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