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To avoid another deprecation problem, I want to use a class to connect to my database and have that class return the database handle, for easy use.

To be a bit more specific, I want to have a class in order to:

  • Immediately connect to a database.
  • To connect as admin or read-only access, depending on the situation.
  • Have $db to become $dbh through the use of this class
  • Thus, $db becomes an open PDO connection (database handle) -so that I can do $db->query...etc. Hence 'return $this->dbh;'

I tried this approach, but something is not working:

<?php

class database {
    private $dbh;

    public function __construct($type=null) {
        switch ($type) {
            case 0:
                self::ro();
                break;
            case 1:
                self::admin();
                break;
            default:
                self::ro();
                break;
            }
        return $this->dbh;
}


    private function ro() {
        try {
            # MySQL with PDO_MYSQL (Read-only access)
            $dbhost = 'localhost';
            $dbname = 'dbname';
            $dbuser = 'dbuser';
            $dbpass = 'dbpass';
            $this->dbh = new PDO("mysql:host=$dbhost;dbname=$dbname", $dbuser, $dbpass);
        }
        catch(PDOException $e) {
            echo $e->getMessage();
        }  
    }


    private function admin() {
        try {
            # MySQL with PDO_MYSQL
            $dbhost = 'localhost ';
            $dbname = 'dbname';
            $dbuser = 'dbadminuser';
            $dbpass = 'dbadminpass';
            $this->dbh = new PDO("mysql:host=$dbhost;dbname=$dbname", $dbuser, $dbpass);
        }
        catch(PDOException $e) {
            echo $e->getMessage();
        }  
    }

}

$db = new database();
//test connection
$attributes = array(
    "AUTOCOMMIT", "ERRMODE", "CASE", "CLIENT_VERSION", "CONNECTION_STATUS",
    "ORACLE_NULLS", "PERSISTENT", "PREFETCH", "SERVER_INFO", "SERVER_VERSION",
    "TIMEOUT"
);

foreach ($attributes as $val) {
    echo "PDO::ATTR_$val: ";
    echo $db->getAttribute(constant("PDO::ATTR_$val")) . "<br>\n";
}

I get the following error:

Fatal error: Call to undefined method database::getAttribute() in...

share|improve this question
    
What is $db[1] - why are you assignit it like an array? – u_mulder Oct 5 '13 at 17:49
    
Refresh the page, I corrected the code – Omar Oct 5 '13 at 17:49
    
Given what you've posted, I think you would be better served by the Factory Pattern, where you call a function or method which creates a pdo instance, configures it, and then just returns it. – goat Oct 5 '13 at 18:35
    
@chris a factory what?!!!...??? I am sorry, but I am a PHP/PDO amateur. Could you please explain it to me with "apples and oranges"? – Omar Oct 5 '13 at 19:05
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems like your needs are focused on creating and configuring an object a certain way, not on enhancing its functionality. In this case, a simple function that creates the pdo instance and returns it would suffice. But, its known more formally as the Factory Pattern.

Here's an example using a static class.

class MyDatabaseFactory {


    public static function create($type=null) {
        switch ($type) {
            case 0:
                return self::ro();
                break;
            case 1:
                return self::admin();
                break;
            default:
                return self::ro();
                break;
            }
}


    private static function ro() {
        try {
            # MySQL with PDO_MYSQL (Read-only access)
            $dbhost = 'localhost';
            $dbname = 'dbname';
            $dbuser = 'dbuser';
            $dbpass = 'dbpass';
            return new PDO("mysql:host=$dbhost;dbname=$dbname", $dbuser, $dbpass);
        }
        catch(PDOException $e) {
            echo $e->getMessage();
        }  
    }


    private static function admin() {
        try {
            # MySQL with PDO_MYSQL
            $dbhost = 'localhost ';
            $dbname = 'dbname';
            $dbuser = 'dbadminuser';
            $dbpass = 'dbadminpass';
            return new PDO("mysql:host=$dbhost;dbname=$dbname", $dbuser, $dbpass);
        }
        catch(PDOException $e) {
            echo $e->getMessage();
        }  
    }

}

Then

$db = MyDatabaseFactory::create(0);
$db->getAttribute(...);
share|improve this answer
    
Good call! You nailed it. – Omar Oct 7 '13 at 4:19

The getAttribute function is a method on the PDO class. Your db class doesn't implement it.

You either have to write a getAttribute function that calls the internal PDO class or extend PDO.

function getAttribute( $attribute ) {
    return $this->dbh->getAttribute( $attribute );
}
share|improve this answer
    
I do not want a class to replace the whole PDO and have to code every single PDO function/etc. I just want $db to become $dbh through the use of this class and $db to be an open connection (database handle) so that I can do $db->query...etc. Hence 'return $this->dbh;' – Omar Oct 5 '13 at 19:08
1  
@Omar - You can't return $dbh from a constructor. You can only return an instance of the class the constructor is a part of. – Galen Oct 5 '13 at 19:21
    
How can I accomplish what I am after? – Omar Oct 5 '13 at 21:21
    
@omar constructors don't return a value. The value of the object instantiation is the new object. You could access it like $db->dbh – JAL Oct 5 '13 at 21:30
    
@JAL - he would have to make $dbh public – Galen Oct 6 '13 at 22:19

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