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Suppose in R I have the following vector :

[1 2 3 10 20 30]

How do I perform an operation whereby at each index 3 consecutive elements are summed, resulting in the following vector :

[6 15 33 60]

where the first element = 1+2+3, the second element = 2+3+10 etc...? Thanks

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Can we assume by "array" you mean "vector"? –  Thomas Oct 5 '13 at 17:49
    
@Thomas : yes I meant vector. Thanks –  user2834313 Oct 5 '13 at 17:54
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you have is a vector, not an array. You can use rollapply function from zoo package to get what you need.

> x <- c(1, 2, 3, 10, 20, 30)
> #library(zoo)
> rollapply(x, 3, sum)
[1]  6 15 33 60

Take a look at ?rollapply for further details on what rollapply does and how to use it.

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1  
thanks this is just what I wanted. I will mark as an answer (cannot do right now because of a time limit). Is this the fastest way to do this? Thanks –  user2834313 Oct 5 '13 at 17:58
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I put together a package for handling these kinds of 'roll'ing functions that offers functionality similar to zoo's rollapply, but with Rcpp on the backend. Check out RcppRoll on CRAN.

library(microbenchmark)
library(zoo)
library(RcppRoll)

x <- rnorm(1E5)

all.equal( m1 <- rollapply(x, 3, mean), m2 <- roll_mean(x, 3) )

## from flodel
rsum.cumsum <- function(x, n = 3L) {
  tail(cumsum(x) - cumsum(c(rep(0, n), head(x, -n))), -n + 1)
}

microbenchmark(
  unit="ms",
  times=10,
  rollapply(x, 3, sum),
  roll_sum(x, 3),
  rsum.cumsum(x, 3)
)

gives me

Unit: milliseconds
                 expr         min          lq      median         uq         max neval
 rollapply(x, 3, sum) 1056.646058 1068.867550 1076.550463 1113.71012 1131.230825    10
       roll_sum(x, 3)    0.405992    0.442928    0.457642    0.51770    0.574455    10
    rsum.cumsum(x, 3)    2.610119    2.821823    6.469593   11.33624   53.798711    10

You might find it useful if speed is a concern.

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1  
nice, +1. It makes me wonder: would a Rcpp based cumsum be much faster than R's? Are your functions handling NA's properly? –  flodel Oct 5 '13 at 18:57
    
For cumsum, probably not -- that's already a primitive, and hence probably just a C loop. On the NA issue: that's a good point. They're handled inconsistently right now. Most operations return NA if one of the elements in a window is NA, although sd returns NaN. min and max ignore NAs, in contrast to R. And I guess na.option would be a useful parameter. –  Kevin Ushey Oct 5 '13 at 19:03
    
@KevinUshey : Excellent thanks. That is really fast. –  user2834313 Oct 5 '13 at 19:14
    
+1 I didnt know about RcppRoll. :D –  Jilber Oct 6 '13 at 23:36
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If speed is a concern, you could use a convolution filter and chop off the ends:

rsum.filter <- function(x, n = 3L) filter(x, rep(1, n))[-c(1, length(x))]

Or even faster, write it as the difference between two cumulative sums:

rsum.cumsum <- function(x, n = 3L) tail(cumsum(x) - cumsum(c(rep(0, n), head(x, -n))), -n + 1)

Both use base functions only. Some benchmarks:

x <- sample(1:1000)

rsum.rollapply <- function(x, n = 3L) rollapply(x, n, sum)
rsum.sapply    <- function(x, n = 3L) sapply(1:(length(x)-n+1),function(i){
                                       sum(x[i:(i+n-1)])})

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(
  rsum.rollapply(x),
  rsum.sapply(x),
  rsum.filter(x),
  rsum.cumsum(x)
)

# Unit: microseconds
#               expr       min        lq    median         uq       max neval
#  rsum.rollapply(x) 12891.315 13267.103 14635.002 17081.5860 28059.998   100
#     rsum.sapply(x)  4287.533  4433.180  4547.126  5148.0205 12967.866   100
#     rsum.filter(x)   170.165   208.661   269.648   290.2465   427.250   100
#     rsum.cumsum(x)    97.539   130.289   142.889   159.3055   449.237   100

Also I imagine all methods will be faster if x and all applied weights were integers instead of numerics.

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very nice thanks!:) –  user2834313 Oct 5 '13 at 18:43
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Using just the base R you could do:

v <- c(1, 2, 3, 10, 20, 30)
grp <- 3

res <- sapply(1:(length(v)-grp+1),function(x){sum(v[x:(x+grp-1)])})

> res
[1]  6 15 33 60

Another way, faster than sapply (comparable to @flodel's rsum.cumsum), is the following:

res <- rowSums(outer(1:(length(v)-grp+1),1:grp,FUN=function(i,j){v[(j - 1) + i]}))

Here's flodel's benchmark updated:

x <- sample(1:1000)

rsum.rollapply <- function(x, n = 3L) rollapply(x, n, sum)
rsum.sapply    <- function(x, n = 3L) sapply(1:(length(x)-n+1),function(i){sum(x[i:(i+n-1)])})
rsum.filter <- function(x, n = 3L) filter(x, rep(1, n))[-c(1, length(x))]
rsum.cumsum <- function(x, n = 3L) tail(cumsum(x) - cumsum(c(rep(0, n), head(x, -n))), -n + 1)
rsum.outer <- function(x, n = 3L) rowSums(outer(1:(length(x)-n+1),1:n,FUN=function(i,j){x[(j - 1) + i]}))


library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(
  rsum.rollapply(x),
  rsum.sapply(x),
  rsum.filter(x),
  rsum.cumsum(x),
  rsum.outer(x)
)


# Unit: microseconds
#              expr      min        lq     median         uq       max neval
# rsum.rollapply(x) 9464.495 9929.4480 10223.2040 10752.7960 11808.779   100
#    rsum.sapply(x) 3013.394 3251.1510  3466.9875  4031.6195  7029.333   100
#    rsum.filter(x)  161.278  178.7185   229.7575   242.2375   359.676   100
#    rsum.cumsum(x)   65.280   70.0800    88.1600    95.1995   181.758   100
#     rsum.outer(x)   66.880   73.7600    82.8795    87.0400   131.519   100
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Awesome! thanks. Unfortunately I cannot vote up because I dont have enough points. –  user2834313 Oct 5 '13 at 18:03
    
@user2834313: no problem ;) –  digEmAll Oct 5 '13 at 18:05
1  
Added a new possible way ;) –  digEmAll Oct 6 '13 at 10:00
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