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#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int age;
    printf("Enter Your age: ");
    scanf("%lf", &age);
    printf("Your age is %d\n", age);
    return 0;

}

If we run the program the prompt will be displayed on the terminal screen, even though there is no newline character at the end of the prompt. How can this happen?

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2  
Pipe the output of the program through less (or more, or cat...) and type your number (you won't see the prompt until later). Observe what happens. Redirect to a file will also work. I'm not convinced this counts as advanced Unix programming. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 5 '13 at 18:38
3  
Four close votes for this question with the reason "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding" ?! But this question doesn't ask for code at all... –  us2012 Oct 5 '13 at 18:41
    
Welcome to SO, user2850169. –  Brian Oct 5 '13 at 18:46
    
The C standard (2011) says in §5.2.1.3 Program execution: — The input and output dynamics of interactive devices shall take place as specified in 7.21.3. The intent of these requirements is that unbuffered or line-buffered output appear as soon as possible, to ensure that prompting messages actually appear prior to a program waiting for input. [...] What constitutes an interactive device is implementation-defined. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 5 '13 at 18:48
1  
I think this question should not be closed. –  haccks Oct 5 '13 at 18:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That most likely happens because your C standard library chooses to flush the output buffers in its implementation of scanf. That's a good idea because

  • this is a common problem and you usually want the prompt at the same line as the cursor and
  • it's not a performance problem because waiting for user input is way slower than flushing the buffer anyways
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If it recognises that the output is sent to an interactive device, it has to flush it - stackoverflow.com/a/1490282/650405 –  Karoly Horvath Oct 5 '13 at 18:36
    
@KarolyHorvath Thanks, corrected. –  us2012 Oct 5 '13 at 18:37
    
Thank you very much. –  user2850169 Oct 5 '13 at 18:42

You can run an experiment:

printf("Enter a number: "); /* the prompt */
sleep(10); /* Add this. */
scanf("%lf", &number);

You'll see the prompt popping up after 10 seconds. It's not documented - that I know of - but it appears in this case scanf causes stdout to be flushed.

You shouldn't count on this behavior however and you should fflush(stdout) when printing a prompt string.

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As noted in a comment, the C standard (ISO/IEC 9899:2011) says:

§5.1.2.3 Program execution

¶6 The least requirements on a conforming implementation are:

  • Accesses to volatile objects are evaluated strictly according to the rules of the abstract machine.
  • At program termination, all data written into files shall be identical to the result that execution of the program according to the abstract semantics would have produced.
  • The input and output dynamics of interactive devices shall take place as specified in 7.21.3. The intent of these requirements is that unbuffered or line-buffered output appear as soon as possible, to ensure that prompting messages actually appear prior to a program waiting for input.

This is the observable behavior of the program.

¶7 What constitutes an interactive device is implementation-defined.

¶8 More stringent correspondences between abstract and actual semantics may be defined by each implementation.

And the library section describing the functions in <stdio.h> says:

§7.21.3 Files

¶3 When a stream is unbuffered, characters are intended to appear from the source or at the destination as soon as possible. Otherwise characters may be accumulated and transmitted to or from the host environment as a block. When a stream is fully buffered, characters are intended to be transmitted to or from the host environment as a block when a buffer is filled. When a stream is line buffered, characters are intended to be transmitted to or from the host environment as a block when a new-line character is encountered. Furthermore, characters are intended to be transmitted as a block to the host environment when a buffer is filled, when input is requested on an unbuffered stream, or when input is requested on a line buffered stream that requires the transmission of characters from the host environment. Support for these characteristics is implementation-defined, and may be affected via the setbuf and setvbuf functions.

¶7 At program startup, three text streams are predefined and need not be opened explicitly — standard input (for reading conventional input), standard output (for writing conventional output), and standard error (for writing diagnostic output). As initially opened, the standard error stream is not fully buffered; the standard input and standard output streams are fully buffered if and only if the stream can be determined not to refer to an interactive device.

Note the 'intent' comment in §5.1.2.3 ¶6.

The specification in §7.21.3 ¶7 means that standard error is either unbuffered or line buffered at program startup, and standard input and standard output are either unbuffered or line buffered (usually line buffered) unless the output is not an interactive device. On Unix, disk files, pipes, FIFOs, sockets (amongst others) are not interactive. Usually tty and pty devices are deemed interactive.

So, if you run your program with output going to a pipe (e.g. to cat or less or more), you probably* won't see a prompt, but if you type the number, you'll probably get the prompt followed by the first line of output with a newline all on a single line (and the number you typed won't appear). If you redirect the input from a file, you won't see the entered value at all. If you redirect to cat, you'll likely see your input on one line, then the prompt and the output. If you redirect to more, you may not see your input at all (separately from the response printing). If you redirect to less, you may get all sorts of interesting screen effects, and still not see the input you type.

You also need to fix the revised code. The %lf format is not appropriate for reading an integer (it is a hangover from a previous version of the code).


* Since the behaviour is implementation defined, what actually happens depends on your implementation. An implementation might do the equivalent of fflush(0) before any input, for example; this would send the prompt to the device. But no implementation is required to do that, and most aren't that thorough (partly because such thoroughness has a runtime cost associated with it).

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