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Following situation:

type
  TRec = record
    Member : Integer;
  end; 

  TMyClass = class
  private
    FRec : TRec;
  public
    property Rec : TRec read FRec write FRec;
  end;

The following doesn't work (left side cannot be assigned to), which is okay since TRec is a value type:

MyClass.Rec.Member := 0;

In D2007 though the following DOES work:

with MyClass.Rec do
  Member := 0;

Unfortunately, it doesn't work in D2010 (and I assume that it doesn't work in D2009 either). First question: why is that? Has it been changed intentionally? Or is it just a side effect of some other change? Was the D2007 workaround just a "bug"?

Second question: what do you think of the following workaround? Is it safe to use?

with PRec (@MyClass.Rec)^ do
  Member := 0;

I'm talking about existing code here, so the changes that have to be made to make it work should be minimal.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
MyClass.Rec.Member := 0; is not accepted because Rec is a property, not because it is a value type. Try with the Field directly, also a value type and it works: MyClass.FRec.Member := 0; –  François Dec 17 '09 at 8:26
    
Well, if TRec were a class it would work. So, both facts are important here (the fact that it's a value type and the fact that it's accessed through a property) –  jpfollenius Dec 17 '09 at 8:30
5  
The workaround is not safe to use. Consider a future change to the Rec property, which so that it reads from a getter rather than a field: your hack would mean it would be modifying a temporary and would have no effect on the underlying field. That's why properties don't allow modifying returned value types. –  Barry Kelly Dec 17 '09 at 8:44
    
Besides the question but: there is not need for the with statement, this should work the same way: PRec(@t.Rec).Member := 0; –  Remko Dec 17 '09 at 11:48
    
@Remko: I know. The original code use with and I want to keep code changes to a minimum. –  jpfollenius Dec 17 '09 at 12:24

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

That

MyClass.Rec.Member := 0;

doesn't compile is by design. The fact that the both "with"-constructs ever compiled was (AFAICT) a mere oversight. So both are not "safe to use".

Two safe solution are:

  1. Assign MyClass.Rec to a temporary record which you manipulate and assign back to MyClass.Rec.
  2. Expose TMyClass.Rec.Member as a property on its own right.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That's what I was afraid of... your second solution means a lot of work and basically eliminates the advantages of using a record here. The first solution would work of course. I'll have to think about this. –  jpfollenius Dec 17 '09 at 8:15
    
Another question: why does the workaround in my question even work? I would expect the property to return a copy of the record here... –  jpfollenius Dec 17 '09 at 8:18
2  
The reason the workaround works is because you're hacking the type system. The type system is trying to prevent you from writing to the property, because a future change may mean the property returns a copy (such as the return value of a getter), rather than the underlying field. –  Barry Kelly Dec 17 '09 at 8:42
    
The type system tries to prevent it from compiling, but once that check has been by-passed, the code generator does the obvious implementation and simply replaces references to the Ref property with the underlying FRef field. Your new workaround isn't really supposed to work, either; I'm pretty sure you're not supposed to be able to take a pointer to a property. –  Rob Kennedy Dec 17 '09 at 14:37

In some situtations like this where a record of a class needs 'direct manipulation' I've often resorted to the following:

PMyRec = ^TMyRec;
TMyRec = record
  MyNum : integer
end;

TMyObject = class( TObject )
PRIVATE
  FMyRec : TMyRec;
  function GetMyRec : PMyRec;
PUBLIC
  property MyRec : PMyRec << note the 'P'
    read GetMyRec;
end;

function TMyObject.GetMyRec : PMyRec; << note the 'P'
begin
  Result := @FMyRec;
end;

The benefit of this is that you can leverage the Delphi automatic dereferencing to make readable code access to each record element viz:

MyObject.MyRec.MyNum := 123;

I cant remember, but maybe WITH works with this method - I try not to use it! Brian

share|improve this answer
    
With does not work with pointer types. –  jpfollenius Dec 17 '09 at 9:41
    
To avoid confusing if MyRec is a pointer or a var (which is not obvious from the name) I would strongly suggest to write MyObject.MyRec^.MyNum if using this... –  Remko Dec 17 '09 at 11:46
1  
Once we get beyond the fact that with is being used at all, I have no problem with this code. It has a few nice things: 1. All direct field accesses (MyRec.MyNum) still work throughout the program without any changes. 2. Changes to existing with statements is minimal: add a ^ on the end. 3. The compiler will tell you exactly where every with statement is because they won't compile without adding the ^ on the end. Thus, there's no danger of making the change and then having identifiers in a with statement silently start referring to some other variable instead of the record field. –  Rob Kennedy Dec 17 '09 at 14:49
    
Ken: What's atrocious about it? –  Gerry Coll Dec 17 '09 at 20:27
    
@Remko - there is no need to worry about "confusion". Delphi automatically de-references record pointers in exactly the same way that object references are automatically de-referenced. Remember that obj: TObject is a reference type (i.e. pointer) but you presumably never get confused by the lack of ^ in those cases. Delphi/Pascal is strongly typed - the declaration of the property identifies it as a pointer. And if it were changed in the future (imagine it becomes a read-only value type, due to usage), you won't then have to go through your code removing all the ^'s. –  Deltics Dec 17 '09 at 21:16

The reason why it can't be directly assigned is here.
As for the WITH, it still works in D2009 and I would have expected it to work also in D2010 (which I can't test right now).
The safer approach is exposing the record property directly as Allen suggesed in the above SO post:

property RecField: Integer read FRec.A write FRec.A;
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately this pollutes the main class. We could just completely drop the record then. AND it means a lot of work to create these properties. –  jpfollenius Dec 17 '09 at 8:27
    
There can still be advantages to using records. They are useful in TPersistent.AssignTo. Also, if you have a memory intensive app, tou can used packed records to reduce memory usage (a a performance cost) –  Gerry Coll Dec 17 '09 at 20:20

Records are values, they aren't meant to be entities.

They even have assignment-by-copy semantics! Which is why you can't change the property value in-place. Because it would violate the value type semantics of FRec and break code that relied on it being immutable or at least a safe copy.

They question here is, why do you need a value (your TRec) to behave like an object/entity?

Wouldn't it be much more appropriate for "TRec" to be a class if that is what you are using it for, anyways?

My point is, when you start using a language feature beyond its intent, you can easily find yourself in a situation where you have to fight your tools every meter on the way.

share|improve this answer
    
You're probably right. As I said, I'm talking about existing code here. And when something works (and by that I mean compiles) in D2007 I don't like it to be broken in the next version. –  jpfollenius Dec 17 '09 at 11:24
1  
Well, you were relying on a bug that was asked to be fixed for quite a long time. Seems like it has finally been fixed. ;-) –  Robert Giesecke Dec 17 '09 at 11:34
    
@Smasher: Just because something compiles doesn't mean it works. In this case, it was a long-standing bug in the compiler that was finally fixed. The fact that it used to compile was the bug, and the fact that it works was because of that bug. –  Ken White Dec 17 '09 at 13:45
    
@Ken: I agree although not everyone knows that this is a bug. And since it's quite comfortable to use, there's a lot of this in our legacy code. –  jpfollenius Dec 17 '09 at 15:37
    
@Smasher. Then your legacy code would be broken once someone put a getter method on the class. It would compile, but NOT WORK. –  Gerry Coll Dec 17 '09 at 20:32

The reason it has been changed is that it was a compiler bug. The fact that it compiled didn't guarantee that it would work. It would fail as soon as a Getter was added to the property

unit Unit2;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
  Dialogs, StdCtrls;

type
  TForm2 = class(TForm)
    Button1: TButton;
    procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
  private
    FPoint: TPoint;
    function GetPoint: TPoint;
    procedure SetPoint(const Value: TPoint);
    { Private declarations }
  public
    { Public declarations }
    property Point : TPoint read GetPoint write SetPoint;
  end;

var
  Form2: TForm2;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm2.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  with Point do
  begin
    X := 10;
    showmessage(IntToStr(x)); // 10
  end;

  with Point do
    showmessage(IntToStr(x)); // 0

  showmessage(IntToStr(point.x)); // 0
end;

function TForm2.GetPoint: TPoint;
begin
  Result := FPoint;
end;

procedure TForm2.SetPoint(const Value: TPoint);
begin
  FPoint := Value;
end;

end.

You code would suddenly break, and you'd blame Delphi/Borland for allowing it in the first place.

If you can't directly assign a property, don't use a hack to assign it - it will bite back someday.

Use Brian's suggestion to return a pointer, but drop the With - you can eaisly do Point.X := 10;

share|improve this answer
    
The use of with is then just a matter of taste. No reason to drop it just as a general rule. –  jpfollenius Dec 17 '09 at 21:47
    
Actually, Smasher, there are several reasons to drop with. It's not just a matter of taste. stackoverflow.com/questions/71419/whats-wrong-with-delphis-with –  Rob Kennedy Dec 18 '09 at 5:31

Another solution is to use a helper function:

procedure SetValue(i: Integer; const Value: Integer);
begin
  i := Value;
end;
SetValue(MyClass.Rec.Member, 10);

It's still not safe though (see Barry Kelly's comment about Getter/Setter)

/Edit: Below follows the most ugly hack (and probably the most unsafe as well) but it was so funny I had to post it:

type
  TRec = record
    Member : Integer;
    Member2 : Integer;
  end;

  TMyClass = class
  private
    FRec : TRec;
    function GetRecByPointer(Index: Integer): Integer;
    procedure SetRecByPointer(Index: Integer; const Value: Integer);
  public
    property Rec : TRec read FRec write FRec;
    property RecByPointer[Index: Integer] : Integer read GetRecByPointer write SetRecByPointer;
  end;

function TMyClass.GetRecByPointer(Index: Integer): Integer;
begin
  Result := PInteger(Integer(@FRec) + Index * sizeof(PInteger))^;
end;

procedure TMyClass.SetRecByPointer(Index: Integer; const Value: Integer);
begin
  PInteger(Integer(@FRec) + Index * sizeof(PInteger))^ := Value;
end;

It assumes that every member of the record is (P)Integer sized and will crash of AV if not.

  MyClass.RecByPointer[0] := 10;  // Set Member
  MyClass.RecByPointer[1] := 11;  // Set Member2

You could even hardcode the offsets as constants and access directly by offset

const
  Member = 0;
  Member2 = Member + sizeof(Integer);  // use type of previous member

  MyClass.RecByPointer[Member] := 10;

    function TMyClass.GetRecByPointer(Index: Integer): Integer;
    begin
      Result := PInteger(Integer(@FRec) + Index)^;
    end;

    procedure TMyClass.SetRecByPointer(Index: Integer; const Value: Integer);
    begin
      PInteger(Integer(@FRec) + Index)^ := Value;
    end;

MyClass.RecByPointer[Member1] := 20;
share|improve this answer
    
That CERTAINLY does not work. The assignment will just change the local variable and nothing in the record. –  jpfollenius Dec 17 '09 at 12:23
    
Ooops, you're right! So the only way is to use: procedure SetValue(const i: PInteger; const Value: Integer); begin i^ := Value; end; which is really the same as your workaround, you could also use a Class Helper: TMyClassHelper = class helper for TMyClass public procedure SetInteger(const i: PInteger; const Value: Integer); end; procedure TMyClassHelper.SetInteger(const i: PInteger; const Value: Integer); begin i^ := Value; end; MyClass.SetInteger(@t.Rec.Member, 10); –  Remko Dec 17 '09 at 13:08
    
Which is the same as would happen once someone put a Getter on the class! –  Gerry Coll Dec 17 '09 at 20:34
    
@Gerry: Yes, I already said that –  Remko Dec 17 '09 at 21:12

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