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I'm trying to append a space to the end of my char, this is the code I'm just testing with and it throws back a Bus Error;

int main() {
    char* test = "Test";
    printf("%s\n", test);
    strcat(test, "a");
    printf("%s\n", test);
    return 0;
}
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Enable your compiler warnings maybe? –  Kerrek SB Oct 5 '13 at 18:47
    
The program compiles fine, it's a run time error. –  user2593573 Oct 5 '13 at 18:48
2  
No, it's a code error. You should get a compiler that's smart enough to tell you that. –  Kerrek SB Oct 5 '13 at 18:49
    
The moral is that C is not a nice enough language to guarantee that "it compiles fine" means "the program is well formed". It requires a considerable amount of discipline on part of the programmer. There exist languages that are less treacherous, which may be more gratifying to use. –  Kerrek SB Oct 5 '13 at 18:50
    
I can't get gcc to warn about this, at least, with -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra. strcat() isn't going to have any idea that test points to a string literal. –  Paul Griffiths Oct 5 '13 at 18:51
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The main problem here is that test points to a literal string, and literal strings are constant and therefore read-only. Attempting to change a literal string is undefined behavior.

If you want to append characters to a string, you have to allocate it first. Either on the heap (with e.g. malloc) on on the stack as an array. The allocated memory must also be big enough to be able to hold the extra character, in your case it has to be at least six characters: Four for the string "Test", one for the character 'a' and one for the special character that terminates all strings.

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Thanks for the explanation, I compiled it both with gcc and clang with -Wall and it never threw an warning or error at me. –  user2593573 Oct 5 '13 at 18:54
    
Do you have a citation for string literals being type const char *? C11 6.7.9.32 says that "char * p = "abc"; defines p with type 'pointer to char' and initializes it to point to an object with type 'array of char'". –  Paul Griffiths Oct 5 '13 at 18:59
    
@PaulGriffiths From section 6.4.5/7: "If the program attempts to modify such an array, the behavior is undefined." While it doesn't specifically state that string literals are const char * (or rather const char[]), since they can't be modified they are that type in all practicality. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 5 '13 at 19:07
    
@JoachimPileborg: No argument at all that attempting to modify string literals is undefined behavior, but the type matters when you talk of things like "partial illegal type conversion", and compiler warnings. As far as I can see, assigning a string literal to a plain char * is perfectly fine and should not result in any warnings, even though attempting to modify through it is not allowed. I believe string literals are (or maybe decay to) type const char * in C++, however, although I haven't checked that out. –  Paul Griffiths Oct 5 '13 at 19:10
    
@PaulGriffiths Ah yes, you are probably right. I may be mixing my C and my C++. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 5 '13 at 19:11
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"Test" is a string literal, you're not allowed to modify it. If you change:

char * test = "Test";

to:

char test[10] = "Test";

it'll work as you expect it to.

EDIT: There's been some talk of whether this should have resulted in a compiler warning, in the comments. In C, char * test = "Test"; is perfectly well-formed and should not result in any warnings. On any sane implementation, strcat() will have been compiled a long time beforehand, so it can't give you any warnings, and since it expects a char * as its first argument, and that's what you pass it, that shouldn't result in warnings, either. It's possible that you could have a really smart compiler which both remembers that you pointed test to a string literal and haven't pointed it at anything else since, and knows that strcat() is going to change it, but this seems pretty unlikely, so I doubt you'd ever get any warnings here. It's one of those things you just have to know and avoid.

I believe the situation is different in C++. Compiling this with g++ -std=c++11 gives me a deprecated conversion from string constant to 'char *' warning, which you can eliminate by changing to const char * test = "Test"; This will then give you a new error when you try to pass a const char * to strcat(), which expects a plain char *. C++ type checking is more strict than with C.

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int main() {
    char* test = malloc(NUMBER_OF_BYTES);
    strcpy(test,"Test");
    printf("%s\n", test);
    strcat(test, "a");
    printf("%s\n", test);
    return 0;
 }
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