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i have a list with duplicate elements:

In python:

 list_a=[1,2,3,5,6,7,5,2]

 tmp=[]

 for i in list_a:
     if tmp.__contains__(i):
         print i
     else:
         tmp.append(i)

i have used the above code to found the duplicate elements in the list_a. i dont want to remove the elements form list.

But i want to use for loop here: Normally C/C++ we use like this i guess:

 for (int i=0;i<=list_a.length;i++)
     for (int j=i+1;j<=list_a.length;j++)
         if (list_a[i]==list_a[j])
             print list_a[i]

how do we use like this in Python ?

for i in list_a:
    for j in list_a[1:]:
    ....

i tried the above code .But it gets solution wrong.i dont know how to increase the value for j.pls help...

share|improve this question

12 Answers 12

Just for information, In python 2.7+, we can use Counter

import collections

x=[1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 5, 2]

>>> x
[1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 5, 2]

>>> y=collections.Counter(x)
>>> y
Counter({2: 2, 5: 2, 1: 1, 3: 1, 6: 1, 7: 1})

Unique List

>>> list(y)
[1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7]

Items found more than 1 time

>>> [i for i in y if y[i]>1]
[2, 5]

Items found only one time

>>> [i for i in y if y[i]==1]
[1, 3, 6, 7]
share|improve this answer
    
+1, definitely pythonic. –  LeMiz Dec 17 '09 at 8:39
1  
[n for n, i in y.iteritems() if i > 1] instead, and i == 1. –  Roger Pate Dec 17 '09 at 8:40
    
...but why the list(y), isn't Counter iterable ? –  LeMiz Dec 17 '09 at 8:41
    
You're right LeMiz, I was a bit rush. Thanks –  YOU Dec 17 '09 at 8:44
    
@Roger Pate, thanks, yours is no need to do dict lookup, it could be better. –  YOU Dec 17 '09 at 8:50

Use the in operator instead of calling __contains__ directly.

What you have almost works (but is O(n**2)):

for i in xrange(len(list_a)):
  for j in xrange(i + 1, len(list_a)):
    if list_a[i] == list_a[j]:
      print "duplicate:", list_a[i]

But it's far easier to use a set (roughly O(n) due to the hash table):

seen = set()
for n in list_a:
  if n in seen:
    print "duplicate:", n
  else:
    seen.add(n)

Or a dict, if you want to track locations of duplicates (also O(n)):

import collections
items = collections.defaultdict(list)
for i, item in enumerate(list_a):
  items[item].append(i)
for item, locs in items.iteritems():
  if len(locs) > 1:
    print "duplicates of", item, "at", locs

Or even just detect a duplicate somewhere (also O(n)):

if len(set(list_a)) != len(list_a):
  print "duplicate"
share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? –  Roger Pate Dec 17 '09 at 8:32

You could always use a list comprehension:

dups = [x for x in list_a if list_a.count(x) > 1]
share|improve this answer
2  
This traverses the list once for each element (Although, OP's code is O(N**2), too). –  Alok Singhal Dec 17 '09 at 8:41
    
+1 for one-liner –  Mizipzor Dec 17 '09 at 9:42
    
Yeah, I understood it's inefficient. If the OP is looking for that, he should go with Roger's answers for sure. –  Evan Fosmark Dec 17 '09 at 10:23
1  
I think this is slightly more efficient: [x for i,x in enumerate(list_a) if list_a[i:].count(x) > 1] –  Dmitry Beransky Aug 12 '11 at 19:50
    
this will return a list with duplicates as well as list_a.count(x) > 1 will return True for each occurence of the element. I'd use set() to get unique duplicates –  dmitko Nov 8 '12 at 14:21

Before Python 2.3, use dict() :

>>> lst = [1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 5, 2]
>>> stats = {}
>>> for x in lst : # count occurrences of each letter:
...     stats[x] = stats.get(x, 0) + 1 
>>> print stats
{1: 1, 2: 2, 3: 1, 5: 2, 6: 1, 7: 1} # filter letters appearing more than once:
>>> duplicates = [dup for (dup, i) in stats.items() if i > 1] 
>>> print duplicates

So a function :

def getDuplicates(iterable):
    """
       Take an iterable and return a generator yielding its duplicate items.
       Items must be hashable.

       e.g :

       >>> sorted(list(getDuplicates([1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 5, 2])))
       [2, 5]
    """
    stats = {}
    for x in iterable : 
        stats[x] = stats.get(x, 0) + 1
    return (dup for (dup, i) in stats.items() if i > 1)

With Python 2.3 comes set(), and it's even a built-in after than :

def getDuplicates(iterable):
    """
       Take an iterable and return a generator yielding its duplicate items.
       Items must be hashable.

       e.g :

       >>> sorted(list(getDuplicates([1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 5, 2])))
       [2, 5]
    """
    try: # try using built-in set
        found = set() 
    except NameError: # fallback on the sets module
        from sets import Set
        found = Set()

    for x in iterable:
        if x in found : # set is a collection that can't contain duplicate
            yield x
        found.add(x) # duplicate won't be added anyway

With Python 2.7 and above, you have the collections module providing the very same function than the dict one, and we can make it shorter (and faster, it's probably C under the hood) than solution 1 :

import collections

def getDuplicates(iterable):
    """
       Take an iterable and return a generator yielding its duplicate items.
       Items must be hashable.

       e.g :

       >>> sorted(list(getDuplicates([1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 5, 2])))
       [2, 5]
    """
    return (dup for (dup, i) in collections.counter(iterable).items() if i > 1)

I'd stick with solution 2.

share|improve this answer
def get_duplicates(arr):
    dup_arr = arr[:]
    for i in set(arr):
        dup_arr.remove(i)       
    return list(set(dup_arr))   


print get_duplicates([1,2,3,5,6,7,5,2])
[2, 5]

print get_duplicates([1,2,1,3,4,5,4,4,6,7,8,2])
[1, 2, 4]
share|improve this answer

If you're looking for one-to-one mapping between your nested loops and Python, this is what you want:

n = len(list_a)
for i in range(n):
    for j in range(i+1, n):
        if list_a[i] == list_a[j]:
            print list_a[i]

The code above is not "Pythonic". I would do it something like this:

seen = set()
for i in list_a:
   if i in seen:
       print i
   else:
       seen.add(i)

Also, don't use __contains__, rather, use in (as above).

share|improve this answer

The following requires the elements of your list to be hashable (not just implementing __eq__ ). I find it more pythonic to use a defaultdict (and you have the number of repetitions for free):

import collections
l = [1, 2, 4, 1, 3, 3]
d = collections.defaultdict(int)
for x in l:
   d[x] += 1
print [k for k, v in d.iteritems() if v > 1]
# prints [1, 3]
share|improve this answer
    
Change to if d[v] > 1 and I'll +1. –  Chris Lutz Dec 17 '09 at 9:20
    
Chris: I think you've misunderstood this answer, it works as it is now and your suggestion would break it. –  Roger Pate Dec 17 '09 at 9:29

You could just "translate" it line by line.

c++

for (int i=0;i<=list_a.length;i++)
    for (int j=i+1;j<=list_a.length;j++)
        if (list_a[i]==list_a[j])
            print list_a[i]

Python

for i in range(0, len(list_a)):
    for j in range(i + 1, len(list_a))
        if list_a[i] == list_a[j]:
            print list_a[i]

c++ for loop:

for(int x = start; x < end; ++x)

Python equivalent:

for x in range(start, end):
share|improve this answer
3  
You should not accept this answer. Yes, it's valid code, but it's not the way you should code in Python. Don't code Python like C/C++, or Java. They are not the same languages, and are not meant to be used the same way. –  e-satis Dec 17 '09 at 9:27
    
I agree with e-satis, although the the question specifically tries to compare the routine to C/C++ we should try to nudge it in the right direction. –  Mizipzor Dec 17 '09 at 9:43

Looks like you have a list list_a potentially including duplicates, which you would rather keep as it is, and build a de-duplicated list tmp based on list_a. In Pythin 2.7, you can accomplish this with one line: tmp = list(set(list_a))

Comparing the lengths of tmp and list_a at this point should clarify if there were indeed duplicate items in list_a. This may help simplify things if you want to go into the loop for additional processing.

share|improve this answer

Just quick and dirty,

list_a=[1,2,3,5,6,7,5,2] 
holding_list=[]

for x in list_a:
    if x in holding_list:
        pass
    else:
        holding_list.append(x)

print holding_list

Output [1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7]

share|improve this answer

Using numpy:

import numpy as np
count,value = np.histogram(list_a,bins=np.hstack((np.unique(list_a),np.inf)))
print 'duplicate value(s) in list_a: ' + ', '.join([str(v) for v in value[count>1]])
share|improve this answer

A little bit more Pythonic implementation (not the most, of course), but in the spirit of your C code could be:

for i, elem in enumerate(seq):
    if elem in seq[i+1:]:
        print elem

Edit: yes, it prints the elements more than once if there're more than 2 repetitions, but that's what the op's C pseudo code does too.

share|improve this answer
    
You must sort before doing that. Use sorted. What's more, you will print the same duplicate several times if there is more than one of the same. –  e-satis Dec 17 '09 at 9:03
    
This will print the same element multiple times if it occurs more than 2 times in the list. –  truppo Dec 17 '09 at 9:04
1  
Have you guys bothered to read the op's code? It does the exactly the same. @e-satis There's no need to sort, maybe you meant something like [k for k, it in itertools.groupby(sorted(l)) if len(list(it)) > 1] ? –  fortran Dec 17 '09 at 11:21

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