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I have the following block which allows me to add whole entries with keyword and definition:

class Dictionary

  def initialize
    @d = {}
  end

  def entries
    @d
  end

  def add(entry)
    (entry).each {|k,v=nil| 
      @d[k] = v
    }
  end

  def keywords
    @d.keys
  end

end

I want to be able to add a keyword without a definition (add key, but no value). I tried setting v=nil in the block above, but it still fails. Here is the error I get when running against Rspec:

Dictionary
  is empty when created
  can add whole entries with keyword and definition
  add keywords (without definition) (FAILED - 1)

Failures:

  1) Dictionary add keywords (without definition)
     Failure/Error: @d.add('fish')     
     NoMethodError:
      undefined method `each' for "fish":String
   # ./11_dictionary/dictionary.rb:13:in `add'
   # ./11_dictionary/dictionary_spec.rb:27:in `block (2 levels) in <top (required)>' 

Finally, here is the rspec test it needs to pass:

it 'add keywords (without definition)' do
  @d.add('fish')
  @d.entries.should == {'fish' => nil}
  @d.keywords.should == ['fish']
end
share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Sergio Tulentsev, sawa, knut, typ1232, Soner Gönül Mar 2 '14 at 10:14

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
shouldn't do a def add(entry, val=nil) @d[entry]=val unless @d[entry] end do the trick? or do i not understand the question? –  halfbit Oct 5 '13 at 19:33
    
Thanks, but i got an error when i tried that. I think the add method only takes one argument rather than two. –  user2785673 Oct 5 '13 at 20:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Assuming that entry can be a Hash like 'fish' => 1 or a String like 'fish'

def add(entry)
  if entry.is_a? Hash
     (entry).each {|k,v=nil| 
        @d[k] = v
     }
  elsif entry.is_a? String
    @d[entry] = nil
  else 
    raise "wrong input type in add entry"
  end
end

You can similarly handle different forms of inputs. For e.g. to handle an array of entries check if entry.is_a? Array and then process accordingly.

That said probably a cleaner way of coding this method is to have the key and value as explicit inputs as @steenslag has suggested.

def add_key(k,v=nil)
   @d[k] = v
end

Then you can call the method like add("fish", 1) to add with a value OR add('fish') to add without a value.

To add multiple keys define another method like:

def add_keys(opts={})
  opts.map{|k,v| @d[k] = v}
end

This can be called as add_keys("fish" => 1, "dog" => 2, "mouse" => nil). This notation is along the same lines of update_attribute and update_attributes methods of RoR.

share|improve this answer
    
This worked! Thanks. I'm a newbie so I didn't even know about the .is_a? methods. –  user2785673 Oct 5 '13 at 21:41
1  
You might consider using a case statement here: case entry ... when Hash ... when String ... else ... end. (case uses ===) –  Cary Swoveland Oct 5 '13 at 21:43
    
@user2785673 see the updated answer for some more info. –  tihom Oct 5 '13 at 21:50

What did you mean by that?

def add(entry)
  (entry).each {|k,v=nil|
    @d[k] = v
  }
end

Since you pass a single element, the body can be simply this:

def add(entry)
  @d[entry] = nil
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but when i try this, the test before it doesn't pass (that's the test to accept both keyword and definitions). It looks like I need to be able to accept 1. empty hashes (which works with my original code), 2. keywords and definitions (which also works),but also 3. keywords only (with no definitions)... –  user2785673 Oct 5 '13 at 19:56
def add(key, value=nil)
  @d[key] = value
end

Should do the trick.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi thanks, but similar to the comment above, when I try that, it fails the prior test which is supposed to accept both keys and values. I have to find a way for the add method to accept both key-value entries as well as just keys. –  user2785673 Oct 5 '13 at 21:01
    
try calling the method like this: @d.add("fish, 1) and @d.add("dog"). –  steenslag Oct 5 '13 at 21:11
    
Unfortunately, the method can only accept one argument. It looks like the solution above, using .is_a? method worked. Thanks again though –  user2785673 Oct 5 '13 at 21:43

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