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I have some classes that don't implement a certain interface but structurally comply to that interface.

interface IFoo {
    void method();
}

class Bar {  // does not implement IFoo
   public void method() {...}
}

Now, I could write a wrapper around those classes that simply delegate to the wrapped class

class BarWrapper : IFoo {
   Bar bar = new Bar();
   public void method()
   {
      bar.method();
   }
}

But that's lots of tedious work. Can those wrapper classes somehow be generated automatically? Something like:

IFoo foo = CreateWrapper<IFoo>(new Bar());

I'm sure you could do this with Reflection.Emit but I've never used that and it doesn't look very easy at first glance.

Is there an easier way or is there perhaps a library that already implements this?

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If you end up having to write it yourself, this might help as a related example: stackoverflow.com/questions/847809/… –  Marc Gravell Dec 17 '09 at 8:38

8 Answers 8

What you're trying to accomplish, is known as duck typing. There are some dedicated libraries that will let you do that, although I haven't used any of them.

With little effort (and some reflection) you can use Castle Dynamic Proxy to do that, using approach outlined here.

If for some reason the interceptor based approach would not be acceptable for you Dynamic Proxy does not support that out of the box (yet), but if you use version 2.2 beta, it would be fairly easy to provide that in a strongly typed manner (without using interceptors), by providing your own proxy type builder (take a look at how mixins are implemented).

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1  
+1 Thanks for joining :) –  Mark Seemann Dec 17 '09 at 19:31

If you want light and simple Duck typing support, you can also check out: Duck Typing project. It works with .Net 2.0 and newer.

Usage example (taken from David Meyer's site):

public interface ICanAdd
{
    int Add(int x, int y);
}

// Note that MyAdder does NOT implement ICanAdd, 
// but it does define an Add method like the one in ICanAdd:
public class MyAdder
{
    public int Add(int x, int y)
    {
        return x + y;
    }
}

public class Program
{
    void Main()
    {
        MyAdder myAdder = new MyAdder();

        // Even though ICanAdd is not implemented by MyAdder, 
        // we can duck cast it because it implements all the members:
        ICanAdd adder = DuckTyping.Cast<ICanAdd>(myAdder);

        // Now we can call adder as you would any ICanAdd object.
        // Transparently, this call is being forwarded to myAdder.
        int sum = adder.Add(2, 2);
    }
}

Using extension methods, you could simplify it into something like this (simlar to Bart De Smet's syntax)

MyAdder myAdder = new MyAdder(); // this doesn't implement the interface
ICanAdd adder = myAdder.AsIf<ICanAdd>(); // but it quacks like a duck
int sum = adder.Add(2, 2);
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You might want to look at Castle Project's DynamicProxy. That's what Rhino.Mocks uses for its type proxying.

I haven't used it myself, so I don't know how much effort it will require on your part, but I suspect it's a good starting point.

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AFAIK, the current version of Dynamic Proxy only works on interfaces and concrete types, and can only intercept virtual methods. It doesn't do mapping. However, it may address this in the future: using.castleproject.org/display/CASTLE/… (scroll down to "Type Wrapping") –  Mark Seemann Dec 17 '09 at 8:46
    
@Mark: The question only mentions working with interfaces, so that doesn't sound like a relevant significant restriction to me. –  Jon Skeet Dec 17 '09 at 9:01
    
@Jon Skeet: Yes, but he wants to wrap/proxy a concrete class that neither implements an interface nor has virtual methods, so I think it is very relevant. –  Mark Seemann Dec 17 '09 at 9:59
    
@Mark: But he only needs to intercept the interface calls - he can make those call the non-virtual methods on the specific instance fairly easily, I'd imagine. It won't be a one-liner, but it's a starting point. Maybe I'm missing the point, but if it works for mocks I can't see how it couldn't work for this... –  Jon Skeet Dec 17 '09 at 10:16
    
@Jon: I managed to draw Krzysztof Koźmic to answer this question as well. I'll let him have the final word here - he knows a lot more about Dynamic Proxy than I do :) –  Mark Seemann Dec 17 '09 at 19:30

You could create a new class

class SubBar : IFoo, Bar {
}

and instantiate that (Assuming Bar truly has the ducktype, i.e., the exact IFoo methods).

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Take a look at Introducing “The C# Ducktaper” – Bridging the dynamic world with the static world as this blog post describes exactly what you need.

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If you are willing to use .NET 4, a solution could be to define the wrapper class as a DynamicObject, and convert the calls to the dynamic methods to calls to the wrapped class by using reflection (I'm not sure if that would actually be less work, anyway; also take in account possible performance concerns associated to the usage of reflection).

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Although I haven't used them myself I think T4 templates in Visual Studio can be used for code generation of dynamic types link text.

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Here's a slightly different approach using generics. This would need a little more work thought. You need to implement a wrapper for each Interface and call all the methods with reflection.

class FooWrapper<T> : IFoo
{
   private T obj;

   public FooWrapper(T obj)
   {
      this.obj = obj;
   }

   public void method()
   {
      // call method with reflection
      // obj.method();
   }
}

IFoo foo = new FooWrapper(new Bar());
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+1: would do the same. Plus adding some reflection cache to minimize the performance penalty added by finding the methods by reflection –  Marc Wittke Dec 17 '09 at 11:10
1  
Nice idea, but if you are using Reflection, then you may as well go for some existing duck typing solutions. At the end, for performance reasons, you would end up Emiting IL code and reinventing the wheel. –  Groo Dec 17 '09 at 11:53

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