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I am copying each line of a file to separate files, depending on the content. Each line begins with "foo" or "bar", and I want to read the first few characters of each line and dynamically change the file name variable.

readfile = File.open("myfile.txt", 'r')
file_foo = File.open("file1.txt", 'w')
file_bar = File.open("file2.txt", 'w')

for line in readfile
  writefile = 'file_' + line[0..2]
  writefile.write(line)
end
file_foo.close
file_bar.close

This throws an error, as the variable writefile refers to the string "file_foo" or "file_bar".

Suggestions for an elegant Rubyist solution? I couldn't see from the documentation how send method could be applied here if that is indeed the way to go.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make a hash of files:

readfile = File.open("myfile.txt", 'r')

files = {
  'foo' => File.open("file1.txt", 'w'),
  'bar' => File.open("file2.txt", 'w')
}

for line in readfile
  files[line[0..2]].write(line)
end
files.each {|k, v| v.close}
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elegant and simple –  Jonathan_W Oct 5 '13 at 22:41
    
@Jonathan_W: Thanks. This is a simple problem, and it calls for a simple solution. –  Linuxios Oct 5 '13 at 22:49
    
good solution to the actual problem! –  tihom Oct 5 '13 at 22:54
    
Sorry, I have to be nit-picky here. First, as I mentioned before, Ruby programmers never use for loops. As in, ever. They use methods like each. Second, this program will blow up if a line in the file doesn't start with 'foo' or 'bar' exactly. And third, this doesn't handle the open files properly. If the program fails anywhere, you will have 3 open files that you will need to clean up manually. Even if it doesn't fail, you will still have an open file to clean up (myfile.txt). You need to be aware of these things if you want to learn Ruby. –  rickyrickyrice Oct 5 '13 at 23:25
    
@rickyrickyrice: I know that. It's wanted to fix the main problem in the OP's code, not start a code review. Leave those comments to the OP, not me. –  Linuxios Oct 6 '13 at 3:04

I think you are looking for eval. It will take a string and evaluate it as Ruby code in the current context. So your example becomes:

readfile = File.open("myfile.txt", 'r')

file_foo = File.open("file1.txt", 'w')
file_bar = File.open("file2.txt", 'w')

for line in readfile
  eval('file_' + line[0..2]).write(line)
end

filefoo.close
filebar.close

However, you asked for a "Rubyist" approach. Using eval is certainly NOT a Rubyist approach. Nor is the use of for loops. I'll take a crack at a more Rubyist approach:

infile  = "myfile.txt"
foofile = "file1.txt"
barfile = "file2.txt"

def append_to_file(path, content)
  File.open(path, 'a') { |f| f << content }
end

IO.readlines(readfile).each do |line|
  case line
  when /^foo/
    append_to_file(foofile, line)
  when /^bar/
    append_to_file(barfile, line)
  end
end
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Also, keep in mind that opening a file in write mode ('w') will overwrite the contents of the file on consequent writes. Notice in my example I used append mode ('a') instead. –  rickyrickyrice Oct 5 '13 at 22:28
    
thanks. Why is 'eval' not a Rubyist approach? Your first answer certainly seems more economical. –  Jonathan_W Oct 5 '13 at 22:28
    
There are many perils when using eval. For instance, it can create BIG security vulnerabilities, and it can be nearly impossible to debug in larger systems. –  rickyrickyrice Oct 5 '13 at 22:33
    
Never come across case before... looks v interesting. skorks.com/2009/08/… Why would you use that as opposed to if else statements? –  Jonathan_W Oct 5 '13 at 22:40
    
@Jonathan_W: Not economical at all. eval is probably the most inefficient single method in all of Ruby, a security hole, ugly, and overkill for this type of thing. –  Linuxios Oct 5 '13 at 22:47

You cannot use send because what you are trying to convert a string into is not a method but is a local variable.

From Ruby 2.1, you will be able to use Binding#local_variable_get.

for line in readfile
  writefile = binding.local_variable_get(:"file_#{line[0..2]}")
  writefile.write(line)
end
share|improve this answer
    
That seems like a very useful addition... I see the preview is out now but now the final update –  Jonathan_W Oct 5 '13 at 22:37

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