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I'm trying to use the WinForms Tooltip class on a (WinForms) UserControl that is custom drawn (with GDI+). It's legacy code, but I need to maintain it a few more years. I want Tooltips to show up when the cursor is paused at various places. I don't want to do the calculation to know if I should show the tooltip until the cursor has been paused, which lends itself to determining that information in the Popup event. In the non-working sample code below, I expect that I can move the cursor to any corner on the form and see a tool tip. It seems that if I click to remove a tooltip, I don't see one ever after. And the first tool tip to show is not as immediate as I would expect. How do I make this work?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace TestToolTip
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        private readonly ToolTip _tooltip = new ToolTip();
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            _tooltip.AutoPopDelay = 10000;
            _tooltip.InitialDelay = 1000;
            _tooltip.ReshowDelay = 200;

            _tooltip.Popup += OnTooltipPopup;
            _tooltip.SetToolTip(this, "you should never see this"); // we need something or it won't ever trigger Popup
        }

        private Point _lp;
        protected override void OnMouseMove(MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            _lp = e.Location;
            base.OnMouseMove(e);
        }

        void OnTooltipPopup(object sender, PopupEventArgs e)
        {
            string text = null;
            if (_lp.X < 100 && _lp.Y < 100)
                text = "Top Left";
            else if (_lp.X < 100 && _lp.Y > Height - 100)
                text = "Bottom Left";
            else if (_lp.X > Width - 100 && _lp.Y < 100)
                text = "Top Right";
            else if (_lp.X > Width - 100 && _lp.Y > Height - 100)
                text = "Bottom Right";

            var existing = _tooltip.GetToolTip(this);
            if (existing == text) 
                return;

            if (text != null)
                _tooltip.SetToolTip(this, text); // calls into this method

            e.Cancel = true;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

By canceling the PopUp event you're explicitly preventing the ToolTip from ever being displayed, since PopUp occurs prior to actually showing the ToolTip. e.Cancel = true is getting hit every time your form triggers a ToolTip to be displayed.

I'm not sure of your intentions with e.Cancel, but I imagine you'd only want to set it to true when the text is null or NOT in one of the valid display regions. Add another else to your condition chain and place e.Cancel as the catch-all, which should correspond to all the areas in which you don't want to display a ToolTip:

void OnTooltipPopup(object sender, PopupEventArgs e)
{
    string text = null;
    if (_lp.X < 100 && _lp.Y < 100)
        text = "Top Left";
    else if (_lp.X < 100 && _lp.Y > Height - 100)
        text = "Bottom Left";
    else if (_lp.X > Width - 100 && _lp.Y < 100)
        text = "Top Right";
    else if (_lp.X > Width - 100 && _lp.Y > Height - 100)
        text = "Bottom Right";
    else
        e.Cancel = true;

        var existing = _tooltip.GetToolTip(this);
        if (existing == text)
        {
            return;
        }

        if (text != null)
            _tooltip.SetToolTip(this, text); // calls into this method
}

This should be the simplest and fastest fix.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, your example code doesn't work any better than my original. And you'll notice that mine did not always set the e.Cancel because of the return several lines above it. (The SetToolTip method actually triggers the Popup handler.) –  Brannon Oct 9 '13 at 15:04
    
@Brannon You're right, it doesn't always hit the Cancel; only when the ToolTip text doesn't change. Your code would also load a ToolTip irregardless of position on the form. I loaded your code and verified the behavior. If you hover over a corner, no tooltip is displayed unless you trigger the PopUp event again on the same corner. The SetToolTip does not trigger the PopUp event, it just changes the content of the ToolTip for the control specified. The only way to trigger the PopUp event is by calling Show() or it's tripped implicitly. –  glace Oct 9 '13 at 15:29
    
If you notice, your OnTooltipPopup event is being triggered everytime your mouse comes to a rest on your form. If the solution I posted didn't work, perhaps there's another part of your code that is causing your issues. –  glace Oct 9 '13 at 15:33
    
I don't have any more example code than what I posted above. I want the Popup event to trigger every time the mouse comes to rest. That's perfect. My real computation to show the tooltip is too expensive to run in a mouse-move event. –  Brannon Oct 9 '13 at 15:40

I think than in your method void OnTooltipPopup(object sender, PopupEventArgs e) your missing the following line

_tooltip.Show(text, _lp);

It should force tooltip to show anyhow.

Also to avoid counting position on this method try to test hitting the region from Paint from System.Drawning. Its describbed on MSDN at above link: msdn

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, but replacing the SetToolTip with Show doesn't seem to make any difference in final behavior. –  Brannon Oct 15 '13 at 16:52

Not very elegant, but you can use a Timer to track when the mouse is idle in your control, and update the tooltip in the Elapsed event.

Example:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    private readonly ToolTip _tooltip = new ToolTip();
    private readonly System.Timers.Timer _mouseIdleTimer = new System.Timers.Timer();

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        MouseLeave += Form1_MouseLeave;
        MouseMove += Form1_MouseMove;

        _mouseIdleTimer.AutoReset = false;
        _mouseIdleTimer.Interval = 900;
        _mouseIdleTimer.Elapsed += _mouseIdleTimer_Elapsed;

        _tooltip.AutoPopDelay = 10000;
        _tooltip.InitialDelay = 1000;
        _tooltip.ReshowDelay = 200;
    }

    void Form1_MouseLeave(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        _mouseIdleTimer.Stop();
    }

    private Point _lp;
    void Form1_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        _lp = e.Location;

        // Mouse still moving, restart the countdown
        _mouseIdleTimer.Stop();
        _mouseIdleTimer.Start();
    }

    void _mouseIdleTimer_Elapsed(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        string text = null;
        if (_lp.X < 100 && _lp.Y < 100)
            text = "Top Left";
        else if (_lp.X < 100 && _lp.Y > Height - 100)
            text = "Bottom Left";
        else if (_lp.X > Width - 100 && _lp.Y < 100)
            text = "Top Right";
        else if (_lp.X > Width - 100 && _lp.Y > Height - 100)
            text = "Bottom Right";

        BeginInvoke(
            (Action)(
                () => 
                {
                    string currentText = _tooltip.GetToolTip(this);
                    if (currentText != text)
                    {
                        _tooltip.SetToolTip(this, text);
                    }
                }
            )
        );
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for posting some code that actually works. Well, by works I mean "almost". It actually posts the wrong text if you move between corners quickly. However, it's much closer. –  Brannon Oct 15 '13 at 16:51

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