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I'm migrating a project to c++ because I hit a performance ceiling while developing it in c#. It's my first time using c++, however, and I'm finding myself doing something a lot that doesn't seem quite right...

Consider the following abstracted example:

class ClassC
{
    ClassC::ClassC(int option)
    {
        //do something
    }
}

class ClassB
{
    ClassC* objC

    ClassB::ClassB(ClassC* objC)
    {
        this->objC = new ClassC(*objC);
    }
}

class ClassA
{
    void functionA(void)
    {
        ClassB objB (&ClassC(2));
    }
}

ClassA has a function which creates a ClassB. ClassB's constructor accepts a ClassC, objC. objC is passed by reference because ClassC is not a primitive type, but its stored by reference because ClassC has no default constructor. However, because objC is created in static memory and will be destructed when functionA completes, ClassB needs to copy to the value pointed by objC into dynamic memory, then store a pointer to that copy.

This seems very round-a-bout to me, and makes me feel like im approaching something incorrectly. Is this a standard thing to do in c++?

EDIT: Everyone seems to be saying that the line ClassB objB (&ClassC(2)); is incorrect because the value of the ClassC object will be lost before ClassB can make a copy of it. But I have compiled my example and this is not the case. Here is revised, working code:

class ClassC
{
    int option;

public:
    ClassC::ClassC(int option)
    {
        this->option = option;
    }

    int ClassC::getOption(void)
    {
        return option;
    }
};

class ClassB
{
    ClassC* objC;

public:
    ClassB::ClassB(ClassC* objC)
    {
        this->objC = new ClassC(*objC);
    }

    int ClassB::getOption(void)
    {
        return objC->getOption();
    }
};

class ClassA
{
public:
    static ClassB functionA(void)
    {
        return ClassB (&ClassC(2));
    }
};

int main(void)
{
    ClassB objB = ClassA::functionA();

    int test = objB.getOption(); //test = 2, therefore objC was copied successfully.

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Are you getting any errors? What are they? –  0x499602D2 Oct 6 '13 at 3:59
1  
ClassB objB (&ClassC(2)); this here is taking the address of a temporary. Not such a good thing. –  Troy Oct 6 '13 at 4:00
    
You need to learn about object lifetime and ownership semantics. These things you have to worry about far less in c#. –  Troy Oct 6 '13 at 4:02
1  
1. don't use pointer if it's avoidable. 2. pass by const ref instead of pointer –  billz Oct 6 '13 at 4:02
    
Other than vague suggestions it's hard to suggest what to do with the example code as your intentions aren't really clear. –  Troy Oct 6 '13 at 4:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Not sure what's your real question, but your code seems fragile. I'd like to rewrite your code as you have shown to this way:

class ClassC
{
    explicit ClassC(int option)
//  ^^^^^^^^ stop implicit conversion, if constructor takes one parameter
    {
        //do something
    }
};

class ClassB
{
    ClassC objC;                         // store by value instead of pointer. 
                                         // Even smart pointer will be better option than raw pointer

    explicit ClassB(const ClassC& objC)  // pass by const reference instead
    : objC(objC)                         // use member initializer list to initialize members
    {
    }
};

class ClassA
{
    void functionA(void)
    {
        ClassB objB(ClassC(2));
    }
};
share|improve this answer
1  
In this code, you are creating a temporary ClassC, then passing a reference to a temporary, then copying it again into objC. I would change the constructor to explicit ClassB(ClassC c) : objC(std::move(c)) {}, which would result in no copies since the temporary will be moved into the classB constructor parameter (since its an rvalue), and will then used to move construct objC. –  Muhammad Faizan Oct 6 '13 at 4:26
    
@MuhammadFaizan I see your point. however, there isn't much value to add move semantics to OP atm. –  billz Oct 6 '13 at 4:32
    
@MuhammadFaizan The temporary will still be in scope, and he isn't storing the reference, so there is nothing wrong with using it that way. Additionally, ClassB will invoke ClassC's copy constructor, again avoiding the reference to a temporary problem. The move semantics would only help to improve performance (avoiding making all those copies). –  Zac Howland Oct 6 '13 at 4:33
    
Given what I think the OP is looking for, I up-voted this as well (and think it should be the accepted answer). I concur that move-semantics are the ideal way to go as well. The answer I posted was to cover the possibility that the OP was looking for shared-semantics, but I think this is likely more inline with what they're going for. –  WhozCraig Oct 6 '13 at 4:46
    
As a side note, this answer is basically the same thing the OP had posted (just without dynamic memory): Passing a reference of a temporary, which is okay because it is being copied (in the OP, via dynamic memory allocation, here by static memory). –  Zac Howland Oct 6 '13 at 4:56

Taking the address of a temporary and saving it off for later use is a big no-no.

ClassB objB (&ClassC(2));  // taking address of temporary

Further, even passing a const-reference of a temporary across a function parameter list will not extend the lifetime further than the function invoke. I.e. once the constructor is done firing the reference is toast, so this:

class ClassB
{
    const ClassC& objC;

public:
    ClassB(const ClassC& objC) : objC(objC)
    {
    }
};

won't work either. More info can be read here about the details for why.

It would work if you did this:

ClassC objC;
ClassB objB(objC);

but then again, so would your original sample.

One way to have the lifetime of an external object guaranteed is to dynamically allocate the object through smart-pointer ownership. Consider this:

class ClassB
{
    std::shared_ptr<ClassC> ptrC;

public:

    ClassB(std::shared_ptr<ClassC> ptrC)
        : ptrC(ptrC)
    {
        // access the instance with ptrC->member()
    }
};

Now you can do this:

ClassB objB(std::make_shared<ClassC>(2));

and even if objB is value-copied (like in a sort-operation on a container, etc) the shared instance is still intact. The last man out the door turns off the lights (in this case, deletes the shared ClassC object).

Obviously its rather pointless for a single instance that will only be held by a single parent. In that case, I totally concur with other answers that strongly suggest you use move-semantics. If, however, you have a true need for a shared resource this is one way to consider doing it.


EDIT Adding pass-through constructor to ClassB as a trivial example.

I just realized everyone was so harped on assisting you in constructing your ClassC object, that maybe all you need is a way to provide parameters to objC for construction. I.e. Perhaps you fully intend on objB to outright own its own private instance of objC and all you need is a way to get parameters to it for initialization.

This is what a constructor initializer list is made for. See the code below, which (based on your comments, will probably work for you and is much simpler to understand.

class ClassB
{
    ClassC objC;

public:
    // default constructor. initializes objC with default value
    ClassB() : objC(0)
    {
    }

    // explicit pass-through of params to `objC` construction
    explicit ClassB(int option) : objC(option)
    {
    }
};

This makes your code in ClassA simply this:

ClassB objB(2);

This will invoke ClassB::ClassB(int), passing the provided parameter to construction of the internal objC object instance of type ClassC.

share|improve this answer
    
Random observation: I'm just learning C++ for the first time, and it's amazing that the best solutions to something that requires pretty little thought in C# or Java are either move semantics or shared pointers, both of which are C++11 concepts. I wonder how everyone survived before the new standard :) –  Muhammad Faizan Oct 6 '13 at 4:51
1  
@MuhammadFaizan With careful coding. Move semantics primarily provide an optimization (as before it would involve making copies of objects). Smart pointers have been around for quite a while, though. Prior to those templates, it was a lot of debugging and making sure you properly managed your memory. –  Zac Howland Oct 6 '13 at 4:54
2  
@MuhammadFaizan I came from C, and C++ since Bjarne first invented the thing, and without-doubt C++11 was a long time relief for many of the problems we experienced in C++'s-past. Perfect forwarding seriously changed the world, for example. –  WhozCraig Oct 6 '13 at 4:54
    
@WhozCraig "once the constructor is done firing the reference is toast" see my edit... i have tried compiling it and this is not the case. the way i'm currently doing it does actually produce the expected result, semantically incorrect as it may be. –  Madison Brown Oct 6 '13 at 17:03
    
@WhozCraig "The last man out the door turns off the lights" I have to admit I dont fully understand smart pointers (as i'm sure you can tell), but from your description, it seems that this is not necessarily what I am looking for. In my actual program, it really should be ClassB's responsibility to delete objC: that's why ClassA creates it in static memory, then ClassB copies it to dynamic memory and takes responsibility for deleting it. Any thoughts on this? –  Madison Brown Oct 6 '13 at 17:06

Your constructor for ClassC is irrelevant as what will be called is the copy-constructor

class ClassC
{
    ClassC(int option) // defines a constructor that takes an int
    {
        //do something
    }
}

class ClassB
{
    ClassC* objC

    ClassB(ClassC* objC)
    {
        this->objC = new ClassC(*objC); // dereferences objC calling ClassC::ClassC(const Class& obj) - the default copy constructor.
    }
}

class ClassA
{
    void functionA(void)
    {
        ClassB objB (&ClassC(2)); // passing a reference to a temporary ... bad idea, but since it is copied in ClassB (the object, not the pointer), it will appear okay - if your compiler lets this compile (newer ones should/will likely throw an error "cannot take address of rvalue temporary")
    }
}

All in all, this code would be better off with many of the suggestions already mentioned, but it was worth noting that the copy-constructor for ClassC is what was called in ClassB.

share|improve this answer
ClassB objB (&ClassC(2));

This is a bad thing to do. You are getting the address of a temporary object, which will vanish after this line. As already stated, try to use references instead of pointers. Most of the time, you can replace a pointer with a reference, which is a very safe approach (it will never be "NULL").

You could write

class ClassB
{
    ClassC& objC;

    ClassB::ClassB(const ClassC& objC) :
        objC(objC)
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
How would we ensure that objC has a longer lifetime than the ClassB instance? –  Muhammad Faizan Oct 6 '13 at 4:07
2  
And how do we initialize a reference from a const-reference? –  WhozCraig Oct 6 '13 at 4:08
    
I disagree with this answer. I think in most cases storing a reference is as bad as storing a pointer (or even worse, perhaps). Also, like @WhozCraig pointed out this code would not compile. –  Kevin Cadieux Oct 6 '13 at 4:24
    
Yeah, sorry about that. I wanted to make the member objC not a reference, but a simple member of ClassB, since it seems to me he wants to make a copy of the argument objC. –  kamshi Oct 6 '13 at 4:36

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